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Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1912)"

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S ° 2007 1210^5 1 R v 

California Stale Library 



Secession No, 



16753$ 



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4 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 0. 1912. 




The General Says: 

COVER YOUR BARNS, STABLES AND SHEDS WITH 

Weatherproof Compo - Rubber Roofing. 

PAY LESS FOR THE BEST. 

Whittier - Goburn Company 



Distributors. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



LOS ANGELES. 



MT. DIABLO CEMENT 

bast for foundations, dairy floors, fruit dryer floors, ate. ate. 

SANTA CRUZ LIME 

baat for bricklaying and plastering. 

MT. DIABLO LIME 

bast for spraying and whitewashing. 
WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICES ON ALL BUILDING MATERIAL. 

HENRY COWELL LIME & CEMENT COMPANY 

9 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



$ 5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



THE 



State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 4 

Foals of Maraa Coverad in 1911 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$ 5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



$2,850 for Trotting Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



$2,150 for Pacing Foals. 



California State Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE FEBRUARY 1, '12. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS I'O I. LOW'S : 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

For Two-Year-Olds to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1914. 

Two-Year-Old Trotters $600 

Two-Year-Old Pacers 400 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started in above and won no money. 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

For Three-Year-Olda to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1915. 

Three-Year-Old Trotters $1400 

Three-Year-Old Pacers 1100 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started In above and won no money. 



Two-Year-Old Trotters 
Two-Year-Old Pacers 



ENTRANCE FREE — < Hherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

$350 Three-Year-Old Trotters 

250 Three-Year-Old Pacers 



$400 
300 



ENTRANCE AM) PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1. 1912. when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1912, 
$5 December 1, 1912; $10 on yearlings February 1, 1913; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1914; $10 on tbree-years-olds February 1. 1915. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace, $25 to start in the two-year-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pace; $50 to start in the 
three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair at which the race is to take place. 

\o additional entrance "ill be charged in the Consolation Stukea. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered Is a Trotter or Pacer. 
Colts that start nt two years old are not barred from starting; HKi'in in the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITIONS. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats 2 in 3, and for three-year-olds, 3 in 5. Distance for two-year-olds, 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 100 yards. 

It a mare prove* barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or If either the in a re or foul dies before February I. 1912$, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; hut there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 
paid in or < traeted for. In entries, the name, eolor anil pedigree of mare must be given; also Hie name of the horse to which she was bred in 1911. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5000. the amount of the 
guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacng divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen yies^ SJakesJu* ease. tl»e cumber of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Co^isalaCK)B > f nd'.wjjli* thft aoV elusion of the third heat. 
Races for Three- Year-Old Stake and /jOtfisoIiJWo«-e\MV wKlj tfoj. ,t-o$(>l«sion of the fifth heat. 

Money divided in each division of tlte Stake "5ft, '25* 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there an- starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat in three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown by the 
summary. • •••• • ••Jf'JJ t **t*t* .*• 

Entries open to the world. ', ■' ■" • ••■ • • '! S ! 

!••?•••* «.t • •* 'Write- for Entry lilnnks to 
A. I,. SCOTT, President. C, ALLISON TELPER, Manager, Sacrameato, Cal. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank, rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 
Breeder and Sportsman 



ADVERTISE IN THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sportinc Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
T. W. KELLCV. Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sta. , San Francisco. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

National Newspaper Bureau Agent. 219 East 23rd St., New York City 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Offlce. 

Terms— One Year. $3; Six Months. $1.75; Three Months. H. 
Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 50c 
per year additional. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447, San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



AS WE enter the new year with its unknown and 
unlimited possibilities awaiting us, it is useless to 
dwell over the trials and disappointments of the 
past. We must begin again that all absorbing and 
fascinating study of planning for the future. We 
are all guided by that great incentive expectancy: 
Hope, which the poet says, "springs eternal in the 
human heart." Without it what would life be? What 
a blessed thing it is that we are endowed with it. 
From prattling childhood until the frosts of time 
whiten our locks it remains with us and every re- 
current holiday time, especially at the dawning of 
the new year, it seems to be more potent and pow- 
erful. It urges us to look forward to better things 
and smoothes our pathway of all doubts and fears. 
As horseowners and breeders we go into the pas- 
ture fields and paddocks and watch the young colts 
and fillies gambol and play and wonder if their 
names will not be enrolled upon the scrolls of equine 
fame. We had all to do with the selection of their 
sires and know just how good their dams were; and 
look upon them as the living results of our study 
and experiments in breeding. We hope they will re- 
flect credit on our judgment and repay us for all we 
have done and will do for them. We pass into the 
paddocks, where the stud matrons heavy with foal, 
are nibbling the new grass, or are standing by the 
stacks of hay, and we wonder if the new-comers will 
be all we pictured they will be. Hope triumphantly 
leads us to believe they will, and we determine 
then and there to give these mares and their foals 
every possible show. We visit the stud barn and 
carefully inspect the lord of the harem there and 
hope he will get a share of mares this year that will 
prove creditable to him, for without getting fairly 
bred ones or those that have gained renown as pro- 
ducers of colts and fillies that, are endowed with 
speed, we realize that it will be a hard struggle for 
that grandly bred young stallion to forge to the 
front as a sire. We determine to advertise him, 
knowing that on his breeding and performances, his 
claims will appeal to many owners of good mares. 
We hope his book will be filled with the names 
of celebrated mares and we trust that when the race 
meetings commence we shall be able to have him re- 
turned to the race track to lowe;- his record. We 
never look for failure, for the sheet anchor of Hope 
prevents us from drifting on the rocks of disappoint- 
ment. We do not look upon our little collection of 
trotters with an eye solely trained to gaze at them 
from a monetary point of view. The true lover of 
a horse is guided by sentiment strongly fortified by 
Hope. It is a natural heritage and has been observ- 
ant long before our days of money earning devel- 
oped. Money is a necessity, but it is not everything. 
Man may be able to supply his physical wants with 
it but the mental and spiritual man, the one who 
loves to have all those who rely upon him happy, 
is not satisfied to accumulate wealth unless he can 
share the enjoyment of it with those dependent 
upon his efforts. He wants it to make every human 
being, besides every horse and animal he owns, enjoy 
all the good things that he can furnish and buy for 
them. Hope is ever present and its fulfillment is 
one of the never failing principles that sustains him 
through life. Hence, with this virtue ever present 
we enter the year of 1912 better prepared to carry 
out our best ideas than ever. We have profited by all 
the lessons of the past. We will now commence a 
new chapter and never let Despair usurp the place so 
long held by the star of Hope. 



MR. SHIRLEY CHRISTY, secretary of the Ari- 
zona Fair Commission, who mailed circular letters 
to the leading horsemen and associations on this 
coast, writes regarding the formation of a contin- 
uous circuit: 

"I have received a great many replies from asso- 
ciations and horsemen in regard to the organiza- 
tion of the proposed circuit, and all are enthus- 
iastic. The time is certainly ripe for the formation 
of such a circuit, and we should strike while the iron 
is hot. In order to obtain results for the 1912 sea- 
son an early start should be made; therefore, I have 
suggested that January 18 be named as the date, and 
the Palace Hotel, San Francisco, as the place where 
the meeting be held for the above purpose." 
o 

ONE of the best of the Futurity stakes in Califor- 
nia is the State Fair Futurity, No. 4, for foals of 
mares covered in 1911, to trot and pace at two and 
three years old. The sum of $2850 is offered for 
trotting foals, and $2150 for pacing foals. These 
stakes are to be decided in 1914 and 1915. There 
is no reason why every owner of a good mare bred 
last year (1911) should not make an entry in this 
stake, the amount required is only ?2, and no better 
way of enhancing the value of a colt or filly can be 
thought of than by making an entry like this. There 
are conditions embodied in the making of these en. 
tries which strongly appeal to owners of stallions 
also, and they should strive to see that all mares bred 
to their horses last year are named in these siaKes, 
entries for which close February 1st. 

o 

On March 2d we will issue a splendid "Breeders" 
Number." In it we shall publish a number of choice 
articles on subjects that will appeal to every horse- 
man and stockman. We shall also endeavor to make 
it one of the best issued from this office, and to that 
end will strive to have every trotting and pacing 
stallion as well as many of the best mares, colts 
and fillies on the Pacific Coast represented. 

o 

HOLIDAY NUMBERS. 



The "Horse Review," Chicago, as usual, publishes 
a number which will always be kept for its fund of 
valuable information and able articles. Every year 
it presents something new, novel and interesting, and 
this Christmas issue is no exception. The amount 
of labor expended in gathering statistics can hardly 
be comprehended by the average reader, and the 
choice articles that always make this publication 
one of the best published demonstrate clearly that 
everyone "on the staff" takes pride in making it the 
best of its kind published. It has the "earmarks of 
prosperity" on every page. 

The "Christmas Horseman," Chicago, this year is 
different from its predecessors and is filled from 
cover to cover with much valuable information, 
statistical and historical, and is very instructive. 
The Horseman is always welcome and this number 
is one of the best ever issued. 

The "Trotter and Pacer" is the representative 
of its class and every page teems with articles of 
merit. Its illustrations are superb and it is not to 
be wondered at that it has cut a path for itself 
into the the best circles in N ew York, and is always 
a welcome messenger for the upliftment of the great 
industry. 

The American Horse Breeder, published in Boston, 
fills in a niche in the temple of equine publications, 
that cannot be excelled. Its Christmas number is 
full of instructive and entertaining articles, besides 
statistical tables of great value. It is a welcome 
visitor to every horseman's library and its issues 
every week are replete with many things which go 
to make it one of the best trotting horse papers 
published. 

The Christmas Horse World, published in Buffalo, 
New York, is one of the best holiday numbers issued, 
and includes special departments on draft horses, 
ponies and livestock on the farm, besides able arti- 
cles on the trotting horse industry. 

The "Rural Spirit," published in Portland, Oregon, 
comes out this year in finer holiday raiment than 
ever and is full of able articles by the most ad- 
vanced of our thoughtful writers of the north. 

"Wheel and Saddle," published in this city, is the 
latest born of turf journals, but its holiday edition 
shows it is a lusty infant and has much to attract 
the attention of the public. It is well illustrated 
and contains many able articles which reflect credit 
on its editor and publisher. 

The Breeders' Gazette, as is its usual custom, ap- 
pears in elegant dress and is certainly the most valu- 
able (as it is the leading) publication in America. 
No stockbreeder should be without a copy of this 
useful publication, and this Christmas edition is 
"a gem" and shows the wide scope and growth of the 
livestock interests of America. 

o 

The fast trotting filly Mabel Claire, by Constructor, 
out of Lady Belle Isle, which is in Patsy Davey's 
string at San .lose, has recovered from the lameness 
which affected her last summer and is trotting nicely. 
Mrs. F. H. Burke, her owner, is well pleased with 
her recovery. 



CONDITIONAL ENTRIES. 

One of the best rules in the book to promote fair 
and honest racing is the rule regarding conditional 
enlries, which is Rule 3, Section 3, and reads as fol- 
lows: 

"All entries not governed by the published condi- 
tions shall be void. Any proposed deviation from sue : 
published conditions shall be punished by a fine of $50 
for each offense, and any nominator who is allowe I 
privileges not in accordance with the published con- 
ditions of the race, or which are in conflict with these 
rules, shall be debarred from winning any portion of 
the purse, and upon sufficient proof of the fact he 
shall refund the amount, if any he awarded him. and it 
shall be awarded the remaining horses entitled there- 
to, and the said nominator and the secretary or other 
persons who allow such privileges shall be deemed 
to have been parties to a fraud, and he punished by a 
fine, suspension or expulsion, according to the judg- 
ment of the Board of Review." 

In view of the above ruling it is surprising how 
often a horseman endeavors to make conditional en- 
tries whenever a secretary can be found that will 
accept them, not only taking a chance of a fine, 
suspension or expulsion, but should his horse win, 
and the fact that he made a conditional entry be 
known to other money winners in the race, his win- 
nings could be taken away from him as well. Un- 
der the rules it is impossible for him to win any 
money in case his entry is in any respect conditional 
and his winnings are protested. 

At the last session of the Board of Review, a sin- 
gle instance, covering a conditional entry, was 
brought out in the case of H. G. Lambert, and R. 
J. Lambert, of Norfolk, Va., vs. Lafayette Race 
Track, Incorporated, Norfolk, Va., and the secretary 
of the association, O. T. Granger. The Lamberts had 
entered the horses Albanner and Eugene Bedworth, 
conditionally, and, failing to start in their classes, 
were suspended along with the horses for non-pay- 
ment of entry fees by the secretary. Refusing to 
pay, the Lamberts made application to the Board of 
Review for release of themselves and horses. The 
case was continued and the secretary of the N. T. A. 
was ordered to bring a case against the men involved. 

The ruling on this matter will probably put a stop 
to the practice indulged in by many drivers and horse 
owners and acquiesed in by unscrupulous secretaries 
who are anxious to pad their entry lists for race 
meetings and go to any limit to secure what they 
think would be star attractions; regardless of the 
fairness to other nominators in the race. Many 
horsemen try to take advantage of secretaries be- 
cause they happen to hpve a big string of horses 
and insist on some special concession or they will 
not enter. These are the horsemen who are un- 
willing to take a chance. They never want to start 
a horse in a race unless the field is to their liking, 
and are confident they can win before they put up 
their entrance money. With such a secret bargain 
between themselves and the secretary the associa- 
tion has no redress, for complaint to the trotting 
authorities would not only implicate the nominator 
but the officer or officers of the association that 
were cognizant of the arrangement. Any associa- 
tion that wants to permit nominators to enter two or 
more horses in one race and be held for only one 
entry, or to enter one horse in several races, but 
only be held for one entry, should advertise such 
inducements in their conditions instead of offering 
them in secret as a bonus to get some particular 
string of horses to their meeting. Secretaries have 
even gone so far as to make an arrangement wilh 
the nominator that if the horse entered is lame or 
ailing that no entrance fee need be paid, while they 
exact from other nominators in the same race full 
entrance fee and require them to live up to the 
advertised conditions of the meeting in every re- 
spect. 

A case was noted in the Philadelphia Record where 
the writer of the article sent to Baltimore to 
obtain entries for a contemplated meeting to be 
held in his locality, and was given strict orders not 
to take a single conditional entry. He struck a 
driver who had six horses eligible to start in the 
classes arranged for the proposed meeting. The 
driver made the proposition to make five straight 
entries, if the other animal would be taken condi- 
tionally. The result was that the driver took all of 
his horses to another city, probably on his own 
terms. 

Another practice that is carried on extensively at 
the present time is the premiums offered by secreta. 
ries and others interested in getting entries for race 
meetings. Some are offered the chance of starting 
in two events, pay for one only, or "if you don't start 
you are not to be held liable for the entrance." One 
favorite driver gets his shipping expenses paid; 
others get free hay, feed and straw, but the ma- 
jority are held strictly to the rules. 

Tricks that the unscrupulous race promoters are 
not up to are beyond the cognizance of the officials 
and if they can correct the evil of making or re- 
ceiving conditional entries it will help the sport far 
more than the average man would think possible. 

Al. Schwartz, of Alameda, is handling that, pure- 
gaited Cupid gelding, Kid Cupid, which the owner, 
Mr. Gifford, or San Francisco, won several races 
with at the Stadium last year. He looks and trots 
like a 2:10 horse and as he has no record will be a 
money-winner this year. There is another good one 
in this trainer's stable; she Is called Miss Helen, 
sired by Greco B., dam by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, 
and belongs to Mr. A. Hardy, of San Francisco. She 
is a very pure.gaited trotter and is heavily engaged 
in the Futurity stakes to be decided this year and 
will, If she keeps impro ing, "bring home some of 
the money." 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



TSaturday, January fi, 1912. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF 
RACING. 

By George Starr. 
There has been felt of late years among managers 
of associations, owners and trainers of the horses 
and natrons of the sport a general need for changes 
in our system of racing, which would add to the in- 
terest of the public and to the earning capacity of 
the horse. It was probably this belief which 
brought about the Buffalo Dash System, and 
Mr. Welch's Handicaps given by the Readville 
Association. But what little has been done in dash 
races and in imitation of the Austrian Handicap 
System has been only half done. For instance, at 
Boston in the American Derby, something like 
thirty-five horses were started— entirely too many 
for one race— and I am informed that every horse 
was rated as being able to do forty-five yards per 
second, whether he was a two-minute horse or a two- 
thirty horse. The horses were asked to go from a 
standing start, which is not the case in Austria, 
though that system was probably in mind. In their 
races the horses are kept turning at their respective 
posts until all are headed the right way of the track, 
and when they get the signal to start all are on the 
move. 

While it is evident that a departure from our ways 
is being agitated, yet I have not seen in print 
any suggestion which gets at the foundation upon 
which to build the changes that would improve the 
present system and increase the earning capacity 
of our horses. 

For we have two classes of horses that have lit- 
tle or no earning capacity; the one that cannot beat 
2:11 or 2:12, and the horse which gets a record 
better than 2:05. The first is not good enough to 
win, and the latter has no earning power because the 
associations do not give many classes for horses 
with fast records. 

This condition will always exist under the record 
system, but cannot under the Russian and Austrian 
systems, where horses are classified by their earn- 
ings. Any horse that can beat 2:15 has an earning 
capacity there as long as he keeps sound, a norse 
is given a record as with us— but is not classified 
by it. 

Therefore, why not drop the record system and 
group or handicap by earnings? Many years ago the 
Russians changed their classification, similar to ours, 
to their present system of grouping by earnings, 
and time has proved its success. Austria changed 
its system some time ago, and Mr. Pajoncek, who 
is the leading trainer in Denmark, and is now in this 
country for a short time, tells me that 1912 will be 
the last year for the American System of classify- 
ing by records, and the Danes will change in 1913 
to a classification by earnings. Their races are all 
dashes and handicaps. 

Under the Russian system there are eleven 
groups and thirteen named races (such as The Em- 
peror's Prize, etc.); to all of these a horse is eli- 
gible at the beginning of his racing career, starting 
in the first group, he remains in it until he wins 
the sum allowed to that group, then advances into 
the second group, remains in it until he wins a cer- 
tain sum there, and so on until he reaches the 
eleventh group, when he has won in the neighbor- 
hood of $30,000 or $40,000. During the time he races 
in the eleven groups he is eligible to start any 
number of times in the thirteen named races until 
he has won each event, and thereby adds $30,000 or 
$40,000 more to his earnings, if he wins them all. 

In Austria the classification is by earnings, and 
a race is based upon the amount that he has won. 
the distance that one horse is given over another in 
For example, a horse that has won $3,000, starts in 
the same race with a horse that has won $5000, and 
is given a certain distance at starting over the 
horse that has won $5000. Where the fields are 
large the entries are divided into two races and the 
purse doubled. Each division gets the same amount 
that was originally offered, the public has two races 
to bet on, and the association gets a commission 
therefrom. 

In foreign countries races are of different dis- 
tances and a horse can be raced at a distance that 
suits him best. Why, with us, is every horse, re- 
gardless of his age, sex or physical ability, required 
to race the same distance and draw the same 
weight? No other association in the world, either 
trotting or running, requires this. We ask a horse 
like Emboy and a horse like Cresceus to go the 
same distance— one is purely a sprinter and the 
other a long distance horse. 

I had often thought, before knowing anything of 
European methods, that a horse should not be pen- 
alized with a record until he had won a purse. Often 
we have seen a horse win a heat in a race, get a 
low record, and in that same race be distanced, or 
drawn, or even staying in the race get no part of 
the money. Yet he is penalized with the record. It 
has happened, too, that a horse entered in all the 
important stakes wins a heat, or a race and is on 
account of lameness or sickness withdrawn from rac- 
ing at the beginning of the season, and his owner, in 
addition to the expense of training, has the entrance 
to pay on the stakes and his horse has a record 
which may outclass him for all time. 

The entrance fee in foreign countries is usually 1 
to 1% per cent of the purse raced for, and in Rus- 
sia the purse is divided into three parts; 10 per cent 
to the third horse, and the division of the remain- 
ing 90 per cent depends upon how close the second 
horse is to the first. This insures a contest. With 
us it often happens that a driver having second 



money won makes no effort, as there is nothing fur- 
ther to be gained. 

A fault with our system is the opportunity for a 
horse to go through all of the stakes in the Grand 
Circuit and outclass every horse he races against 
without being penalized. Of course, this gives the 
others no chance of winning, neither does it give 
the public a contest. 

Why do we not have racing in June, the finest 
month of the year? In the days of Wiliiam Doble, 
Turner and Mace, and even as late as Rudd Doble's 
time, meetings were held in May and June, in New 
York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington. 
Managers will reply "we can't get entries for June 
racing — trainers can't get their horses ready." Yet, 
we hear of horses being worked better than 2:10 in 
June. 

The remedy, therefore, might be brought about 
by these three things: the dash system, classification 
by earnings and over-night entries for the majority 
of the events, only the fixed events requiring an en- 
trance fee in advance. Horses can race oftener and 
do not require as much work to go dash races as 
to go heat races, and can be gotten ready to race 
earlier. Also, it is possible to race an unsound horse 
occasionally, for when he pulls up, the race is fin- 
ished, and he is not required to come back and go 
another heat to save what he has won. 

Dash racing eliminates the distance flag. (A 
distance flag is very humiliating to some unfortun- 
ate people). 

Abroad two-year-olds are not raced; three-year- 
olds go only about three-quarters to seven-eighths 
of a mile; four-year-olds and over from one and a 
quarter to two and one-half miles witn an occa- 
sional race of greater distance, or a race of two one- 
mile beats, the horse standing best at the end of the 
second heat is the winner. If both stand equal at 
end of two heats, the horse having won the fastest 
heat is the winner. 

Much reference to European racing has been made 
in these notes and if any suggestions are worm con- 
sidering the Russian and Austrian rules and con- 
ditions could be sent for and the Grand Circuit 
Stewards, who would be the initiators, could con- 
sult with Mr. Keyes and Mr. Pennock, who are 
familiar with every point of racing in Russia and 
Austria. 

A pleasing feature of the Lexington Trots is the 
annual presentation of the Walnut Hall Cup. Many 
owners would rather win this cup race than almost 
any other race in this country. 

There should be given with any special event, 
or race to the value of $5,000 or more, a piece of 
valuable plate to commemorate the victory. 

It might be good policy to have many repre- 
sentative people of the community as shareholders 
in the racing plant; each would have an influence 
toward increasing the attendance. 

Make the grounds more attractive by planting 
hedges, rows of trees, and permanent shrubs — this 
sort of planting does not require an annual florist 
bill. 

Toward increasing the attendance two or three 
prices of admission might be tried; this custom pre- 
vails abroad and is practical at other sports in this 
country, and at all theaters. At the recent Inter- 
national Polo Match where admission at fifty cents 
entitled one to stand at the fence, and $2.50 and 
$5.00 to seats, many took advantage of the fifty- 
cent privilege. 

It would be an improvement to lay the dust the 
entire length of the track two or three tunes during 
the afternoon's racing for the benefit of the drivers, 
as is now done in front of the stand for the benefit 
of the spectators. In a race it is sometimes im- 
possible for the drivers to see ten feet ahead; this 
condition is not only disagreeable, but dangerous. 

Eliminate announcements. The bulletin board is 
sufficient. 

Place the officials in the grand stand and do 
without the small stands which obstruct the view. 

Try open booking instead of the associations' sell- 
ing the privilege which permits a combination book. 

The foregoing suggestion are offered with due con- 
sideration to the managers of the association, to the 
owner and to the trainer, and the proposed ciianges 
in our system are not visionary, but have been 
proved by two countries and are about to be adopted 
by the third. 

o 

PERIOD OF GESTATION 



The time usually counted for the period of gesta- 
tion in mares in this country is 340 days. This fig- 
ure was derived from the records of 1071 foals from 
trotting mares. In these records there was a varia- 
tion from 319 days, the shortest period, to 373 days, 
the longest. 

It is the general observation that variations in 
our mares are great and perplexing. An interest- 
ing investigation that may help to explain this mat- 
ter for American as well as European conditions has 
just been made by O. Wellman, of Germany. 

He found that with brood mares the average length 
of the gestation period in the case of 5,437 births was 
335 days. The periods were shortest in the births 
which occurred in July, the average length for that 
month being 322 days. Prom July there was a con- 
stant increase from month to month until May, when 
it reached 346 days. With working mares the aver- 
age length in 171 oases was 326 days, with a seasonal 
variatu n as in the case of idle brood mares. The 
average gestation period of 228 Hungarian cows was 
2S5 days, and of 291 Simmental cows 291 days. Ap- 
parently there was also a seasonal variation in cows, 
but much less in amount than in the case of horses 



DISTEMPER IN HORSES CONTAGIOUS. 

Distemper is a disease peculiar to the horse, and 
it is likely that it will be affected with it some time. 
It is contagious and can be carried on the clothes 
of a person from one horse to another. It may 
break out in a stable and no other cases in the 
neighborhood. The contagion may have been 
brought in some unknown way. * 

There are signs of catarrh; the animal is dull, has 
a cough, and when it swallows makes a peculiar 
sound in its throat; there is soreness in the throat 
and some of the w r ater it may be drinking will come 
back through its nose; the head is poked out, a lit- 
tle frothy saliva from its mouth, sooner or later a 
swelling will appear at the back of the jaw; when 
this takes place the animal has great difficulty in 
swallowing water and food, especially the former. 
In some cases there is very little fever and the appe- 
tite remains good; in others there may be consid- 
erable fever, pulse from 60 to 70. In the course of 
a few days the inflammation in the lumps relieves 
itseli in the formation of matter, which will soon 
come to the surface and the lumps break of their 
own accord if not opened. After this takes place 
the animal is much relieved. Cases may be met 
with where a small abscess may form and the ani- 
mal may show no other symptoms; this soon 
breaks, discharges and heals; in others, although 
not very sick, the condition of ill health may con- 
tinue for several weeks and finally an" abscess ap- 
pears, matures and the animal soon recovers. Again, 
others may swell on the inside of the throat and 
suffer great distress and may suffocate. 

Irregular strangles is where abscesses form in 
other parts of the body, such as on the shoulders, 
hips, flanks, side of the neck or back of the elbow; 
also in the liver, between the lungs or in other parts. 
So long as the abscess forms on the outside it is not 
dangerous to life, but those on the internal organs 
usually cause death. 

The sequel of distemper most frequently occurring 
is a thickening of the lining of the throat, which 
interferes with the animal's breathing, causing what 
is called roaring or whistling. The more serious 
sequel is blood poisoning from the absorption of mat- 
ter from the abscesses forming on the internal or- 
gans. About the ninth or tenth day the animal ought • 
to begin to improve. On the other hand, if at that 
time the fever is increased, appetite lost, breathing 
fast and somewhat labored and the temperature 
from 105 to 106 there is occasion for alarm, as it in- 
dicates that something is going wrong inwardly. 

Theatment. — In the early stages of distemper put 
the animal in a warm, well ventilated stable; clothe 
the body and bandage the legs. If the throat is sore 
put a piece of camphor gum into a pail of boiling 
water and put it under the animal's head (but not 
near enough to scald), and throw a blanket loosely 
over it to keep jn the steam; continue this for fif- 
teen or twenty minutes and repeat it three times a 
day. Dissolve two drains chlorate of potassium in 
half a pint of cold water and put in one teaspoon- 
ful of the fluid extract of belladonna. Shake up and gar- 
gle the throat. This is best done by holding the head 
above the level and pouring a little into the mouth, 
rubbing the tongue to make the animal move it. If 
the animal coughs let the head down at once, and 
after it ceases coughing hold the head up and pour 
in a little more, and so on until it is all used; do 
this three times a day. If there is any fever give 
half an ounce of nitrate of potassium in its drink- 
ing water once a day. Physic should not be given. 
If the bowels are confined give injection of soap 
and warm water; if an abscess forms poultice, chang- 
ing the poultice once a day. When the abscess be- 
comes soft open it and inject a little lotion made of 
carbolic acid, half an ounce, and water one pint. 
Poultice for a few days after it breaks, to soften 
the surrounding part so that there will be no bunch 
left after it breaks. After the acute stage has passed 
mix and divide into twenty-four deses four ounces 
sulphate of iron, four ounces nitrate of potassium 
and two ounces nux vomica, one to be given twice 
a day in bran mash mixed with a little oats. If 
there should be a great discharge of matter from 
the nose after the animal is convalescent put one 
ounce of oil of turpentine into a pail of boiling water 
and put in under the head as above, not near 
enough to scald; do this several times a day. If the 
abscess is tardy in forming mix two drams canthar- 
ides and one and one-half ounces of vaseline and 
rub a little once a week. If the glands of the neck 
should remain enlarged after the animal has recov- 
ered rub on a little of the following: Mix one dram 
binicdide of mercury with one and one-half ounces 
of lard; repeat every second week. If abscesses form 
on other parts of the body they should be treated 
as above. 

If the animal's appetite is poor give one ounce 
each of tincture of ginger, gentian and chloride of 
iron in a quart of oatmeal gruel three times a day. 
Give half this quantity to colts a year old. Give the 
animal small quantities of food at a time and often, 
as it will eat a little fresh hay or oats when it would 
refuse to eat that which was in its manger. 

The three-vear-old Mahomet Watts 2:17% by Gen- 
eral Watts (3) 2:06% is out of Alia 2:21% by Palo 
Alto 2:08%: grandam Lola Wilkes by George Wilkes, 
and Rubv Watts, a yearling colt, by the same sire, 
is out of Cupid Belle by Dan Cupid 2:09%; grandam 
Vesper Bells 2:15%. by Advertiser 2:15%, he was 
also, out of Lula Wilkes by George Wilkes. It's 
strange how these youngsters hark back to some 
good mare. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



SOME SUGGESTIONS AS TO RACING. 



(By Wm. I. Higgins.) 

1 notice communications from a number of horse- 
men, outlining various plans for the improvement of 
racing conditions throughout the United States. 
Since so many are writing upon this subject, it would 
seem that conditions must be bad, and so they are, 
but there will be no departure from the old methods 
for some time to come, as, while the horsemen 
would very generally like to see many changes in the 
present mode of racing, the associations upon whom 
devolves the work of carrying out any reforms are 
loth to do it for fear of a possible deficit. No radi- 
cal changes can come except through the horsemen 
themselves, and then only through an organization 
composed of owners and drivers. 

The attempt to organize horsemen into a working 
body has been a failure in the past. It is certainly 
not due to a lack cf intelligence upon their part, as 
beyond question, they will compare favorably with 
the same number of men in any other branch of 
sports. Yet, it is possible in all other sports to have 
a strong working organization for its promotion, 
advancement and protection. Then, what is the rea- 
son horsemen cannot do this? Is it selfishness? Or, 
is it fear of what the association might do to them 
by refusing their entries, and in other ways annoying 
them, if they discovered they were banded together 
for their own protection and incidentally to compel 
the associations to right the wrongs too frequently 
practiced on them? 

As the game is run today it is every fellow for 
himself, and the devil take the hindmost; and, the 
devil does quite a business each year. 

No, it is not selfishness, for the majority of horse- 
men are liberal to a degree. Anyone in trouble or 
distress is rarely turned away empty handed from 
them, although the giver may need the money he is 
handing out as much as he who is receiving it. 

Then, according to my deduction it must be fear, 
and that it what I think it is. Fear of the wrath 
of the associations. Whether I am right or whether 
I am wrong matters little, the fact remains that the 
horsemen have never been able to get together, as one 
harmonious, thinking, acting body, and until they 
do, conditions will continue about as they are. 

There are a few things that appear to me that, if 
carried out, would in my opinion help the horsemen, 
and anything that helps them would of course help 
the associations. 

1st. Give the big money to the fast classes. When 
this is done the associations will have no cause for 
complaint about the lack of entries, as horsemen will 
always enter where the big money is, whether their 
horses have records or not. It is my firm belief if 
this is done that the rule for laying up of heats and 
the pulling of horses can be abolished, for horsemen 
will not be afraid of marking their horses as they 
will be fully as able to earn money then with a 
fast record as they are now without a record or 
with a slow one. Patrol judges can be stationed 
around a track every sixteenth of a mile, and still a 
driver can lay up a heat and not be detected; can 
pull a race and not get caught. No rule that can be 
made will make people honest, the only thing to 
do is to remove the incentive for dishonesty, and 
pay them well to be honest, and then the problem 
of good clean racing has been solved. 

The associations, and the patrons of a race meet 
all clamor for fast time, and the horse that can go 
the fastest is widely advertised in order to bring 
the crowd. But, it is expected that he will go out 
and trot fast and get the same pay as a two-fifteen 
or two-twenty trotter. This is unfair, because it costs 
a great deal more money to make a two-five trotter 
than a two-fifteen or two-twenty trorter. There are 
great numbers cf young sound horses, with fast re- 
cords that should be racing and furnishing the best 
of sport for the grand stand, (as it has been my 
experience that the average person would rather 
see a field of fast horses turn for the word than a 
field composed of slower ones), that are idle or are 
being used for matinee purposes. 

The purpose of mating with great care a sire and 
dam of speed producing lines, is, I have always 
thought, to get more speed. 

But when you have delivered the goods, shown the 
speed and got a fast record, the associations say, 
(by not giving decent purses to race for) "Back 
to the woods, we are through with you." The faster 
a horse's record the greater should be his earning 
power. 

2d. Divide your purses twenty per cent to each 
horse. Let each heat be a race, and when one horse 
takes a heat he is sent to the barn and at the end 
of the jourth heat the race is finished, the horse fin- 
ishing second to the fourth heat winner getting 
fourth money by virtue of his position. 

Take for example a thousand dollar purse, under 
the old way, first horse gets $500, second horse gets 
$250, -third horse gets $150, and fourth horse gets 
$100; first horse makes four hundred dollars, second 
horse makes one hundred and fifty dollars, third 
horse makes fifty dollars and the fourth horse makes 
nothing. Under my plan the first and second horses 
would lose one hundred and fifty dollars, but the third 
and fourth horses would gain this, and all of the 
four horses would quit winners on the race. What 
is needed is to keep the horse that can't get up in 
front coming along from meeting to meeting and 
the way to do that is to let them have some of the 
money. It is not necessary to worry about the first 



and second horses as they will go to the next town 
anyhow. 

For example, a $1000 purse: 

1st wins two heats $400.00 

2nd wins one heat 200.00 

3rd wins one heat 200.00 

4th is second to fourth heat win- 
ner 200.00 $1000 

3d. Reclassify your horses every third week and 
the horses that have been finishing way back of the 
money will go to the next meeting and the next 
and the next, knowing that when the reclassification 
takes place that they will be in the money. As the 
game is today there are so many horses on the track 
at the first meeting and the fields are so big that they 
are unwieldly, but they begin dropping out when 
they have not got a chance to get money enough to 
even buy oats and hay, and the consequence is, that 
about the third meeting there is a dirth of starters. 

Now what the assocoations want is starters, and I 
believe by adopting the big money for the fast 
classes, a more equitable division of the money, and 
a reclassification of the horses every three meet- 
ings, that they will get all the starters that they 
desire. 

Now, what the horsemen want is a guarantee from 
the associations that they are going to carry out 
their programmes as advertised. The guarantee that 
horsemen should have is a statement from some bank 
in the town where the meeting is being held, that 
thirty-five per cent of the total amount of the purses 
advertised is on deposit in their bank. Then, the 
temptation to start a meeting on a shoe string and 
take chances on the horsemen and the gate pulling 
them out, will be removed. If the game is going to 
succeed it must be recognized that there are two 
sides to it, the horsemen and the association. As it 
is now, there is only one and that is not the horse- 
men. 

I want to say in conclusion however, that the great 
majority of the association are all right, but there 
should be a rule such as the above to make them all 
be right. 

Deer Lodge, Montana. 

o 

LOS ANGELES MATINEE RACING. 



This is the report of the race meeting held over 
the new mile track at Los Angeles on Christmas 
Dry as written by Harry A. Williams of the Tribune: 
it is, to say the least, a new way to describe light 
harness horse racing. The pedigrees are omitted for 
some reason, nevertheless, the meeting was a most 
enjoyable one: 

The Christmas matinee of the Los Angeles Driving 
Club at Exposition Park yesterday afternoon served 
a dual purpose. 

It provided an excellent card cf light harness 
events, and reminded something like 4000 persons 
that the horse, while not as important a part of the 
scheme of civilization as formerly, is not yet an 
extinct species. 

The automobile may be slowly but surely crowding 
the horse off the earth, but that the latter still is pop- 
ular as a play thing was evidenced by the big 
crowd which gathered at the course despite limited 
seating facilities and the manner in which it lin- 
gered along into the gloaming or until the last heat 
of the day had resulted in Bessie L., Charley Chick's 
bay mare, being crowned winner in the 2:25 trot. 

The equine may be forced to run second when it 
comes to the utilitarian side of life, but it lacks 
considerable of being wholly and entirely consigned 
to the soap factory. 

It seems that nearly every light-hoofed nag in the 
entry list was out to disprove all assertions to the 
effect that the horse is a dead one, with the result 
that in a majority of the events they stepped above 
their class. While the track was in fine shape, the 
weather was a bit too cool for the best work, and the 
good time made in some of the events came as some- 
thing of a surprise. 

There were a number of green horses in the lot 
and Starter Ed Smith had his troubles. But Smith 
proved himself a persistent sort of person and in 
nearly every instance succeeded in getting the field 
away to a satisfactory start. 

With eight events on the card, some difficulty was 
experienced in cramming it into the allotted time. 
This was accomplished by chopping the 2:30 trot 
down to one heat, but even with this amputation the 
program was as long as originally outlined, as the 
yearling event, which had been scheduled as a half 
mile dash, was trotted in heats. 

Will Durfee sent Carlokin a mile against time in 
an effort to do better than 2:10. The handsome son 
of McKinney, paced by a runner, turned the trick 
without trouble, trotting the mile in 2:09%. Zulu 
Belle, driven by Durfee, did an un paced mile in 
almost as good time, circling the course in 2:10. 
Zulu Belle won the Futurity as a three-year-old, 
while trotting and recently worked a mile in 2:07 at 
Woodland. She paced in yesterday's exhibition. 

Carlokin's time was almost equalled in the free- 
for-all pace, which was the feature race of the day. 
Steve Bailey, owned and driven by I. C. Mosher, won 
this in straight heats. Steve stepped the first mile 
in 2:10 and the second in 2:10%. The second heat 
was a be-iuty, the horses racing nose and nose until 
they entered the home stretch. Fred E. Ward's 
brown horse, Nordwell, was a good second in each 
heat and each time pressed Mosher's gelding down 
to the wire in a way to provide a thrilling finish. W. 
A. Clark .Ir.'s handsome black gelding .lean Val- 
jean, was off form and forced to take third place. 

It iequired three heats to decide the half-mile trot 



for yearlings which Henry Berry, who was acting as 
chauffeur of one of the timepieces, characterized as 
a race for "bushers." This brought into competi- 
tion three promising youngsters, Zomboyage, owned 
and driven by Ted Hayes; Castro, owned and driven 
by W. N. Tiffany, and Dr. Hagan, owned by Clarence 
Berry, and driven by Durfee. Hayes' colt took the 
first heat in 1:15, and Castro, who was sired by Car» 
lokin, took the second and third in 1:14 and 1:16. 
"Doc" Hagan looked just as fast as either of his 
sprightly young rivals, but was ill-behaved in that 
he preferred galloping to trotting at times, all of which 
caused considerable chagrin in the Berry household. 

The 2:30 pacing event was a good race to watch. 
S. Watkins sent Joe W. under the wire a winner 
in straight heats. Billy N., who until recently has 
acted as the motive power for a buggy, acquitted 
himself creditably under the direction of C. S. Willis, 
taking second in both heats and losing the last one 
by a scant neck. 

Lady Love made the best time in the 2:25 trot, 
which was cut down to two heats on account of dark- 
ness. She stepped the second mile in 2:18, but as 
she could do no better than take third in the second 
haat, the race went to Bessie L., who took the first 
heat in 2:19 and placed in the second. 

Luna M., owned by WMlliam Morgan and driven 
by Frank Williams, took the 2:40 trot in straight 
heats from a field of eight starters. Smith got *l,e 
bunch away to a beautiful start in the seconu heat. 
R. B. Moorehead halted Bobby Boy before the field 
had rounded into the first turn and after tinkering 
around Bobby's head for a few precious seconds, re- 
sumed the race, but not in time to finish in sight oi 
the other nags. L. J. Christopher declared Moore- 
head stopped in order to slip Bobby a chew of fine- 
cut and recommended a fine, but he failed to make 
the charge stick. 

Two heats were lopped off the 2:30 trot, which was 
a waltz for L. E. McClelland's livestock, his Rattler 
breezing home in 2:39. The results- 

Half mile trot, yearling class — Won by Castro, c. c. 

First heat — Zomboyage. Ted Hayes, owner and 
driver, first; Dr. Hagan, Clarence Berry, owner, Will 
Durfee, driver, second; Castro, W. N. Tiffany, owner 
and driver, third. Time. 1:15. 

Second heat — Castro, first; Zomboyage. second; Dr. 
Hagan, third. Time. 1:14. 

Third heat — Castro, first; Zomboyage, second; Dr. 
Hagan, third. Time. 1:16. 

Mile pace 2:25 class — Won by Auto Zombro, b. g. 

First heat — Auto Zombro, Charles Branscom, owner 
and driver, first; Stella, .1. S. Nickerson. owner and 
driver, second; Ma Julia, L E. McClelland, owner and 
driver, third. Time, 2:17%. 

Second heat — Auto Zombro. first; Stella, second, 
Alacker. L. J. Christopher, owner. W. A. Glascock, 
driver, third. Time, 2:19. 

Mile trot, 2:40- class — Won by Luna M.. blk. m. 

First heat — Luna M., William Morgan, owner. Frank 
Williams, driver, first; .lot. Dr. William Dodge, owner, 
and driver, second; Billy Edgewood, H. R. Holland, 
owner and driver, third. Time, 2:31. 

Second heat — Luna M., first; Joe, second; W. C third. 
Time. 2:28. 

Mile trot — Exhibition by Carlokin to beat 2:10, 
paced by runner — Quarter, :32; half, 1:05; three-quarter, 
1:37; mile, 2:09%. 

Mile pace, 2:30 class — Won by .loe W.. s. g. 

First heat — Joe W., owned and driven by S. Watkins, 
first; Billy N., owned and driven by C. S. Willis, sec- 
ond; Burney, owned and driven by W. G. McGaughv, 
third. Time, 2:28%. 

Second heat — Joe W., first N., second; Burney, third. 
Time. 2:26. 

Mile pace, free-for-all — Won by Steve Bailey, ch. g. 

First heat — Steve Bailey. I. C. Mosher, owner and 
driver, first; Nordwell, Fred E. Ward, owner and 
driver, second; Jean Valjean, W. A. Clark Jr., owner. 
Teddy Hayes, driver, third. Time, 2:10. 

Second heat — Steve Bailey, first: Nordwell, second: 
Jean Valjean, third. Time 2:10%. 

Mile trot, 2:25 class — Won by Bessie L., br. m. 

First heat — Bessie L.. Charles Chick, owner and 
driver, first; Leccona, John O'Keefe, owner and driver, 
second; Lady Love, A. L Love, owner and driver, 
third. Time. 2:19. 

Mile pace — Exhibition by Zulu Belle without pace- 
maker — Quarter, :32; half, 1:05; three-quarter, 1:37%; 
mile. 2:10. 

Mile trot. 2:30 class — Rattler, owned and driven by 
L E. McClelland, first; Alhambra, owned and driven 
hv Charles Winter, second: Prince, owned and driven 
by Sam Farrell, third. Time, 2:39. 

Officers and directors of the club and the officials 
of the meet follow: 

L. .1. Christopher, president' Clarence Berry vice- 
president; E. Diffebach, treasurer; E. .1. Delorey, sec- 
retary; J. W. Nickerson, C. C. Colyear, C. A. Can- 
field, C. G. Willis, R. B. Moorehead, Dr. William 
Dodge, William A. Clark Jr., directors. 

Si>eed Committee — Dr. William Dodge, R. B. Moore- 
head, J. W. Nickerson, Chr. Willis. 

Judges — Henry Berry, W. A. Glasscock, C. C. Col- 
year. 

Timers— Dr. A. D. Hubbell, A. J. Feild, J. Thomas. 
Starter— Ed Smith. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



What is the pedigree of MacKie? 

Ans. — He was foaled in 1903, and was sired by 
McKinney 2:11V4, dam by Baywood (son of Nut- 
wood 2:18%); second dam Lily by Geo. M. Patchen 
Jr. 2:27; third dam Nellie by Pieta, son of William- 
son's Belmont ; fourth dam Nellie, a mare that came 
across the plains from Illinois and claimed to be 
by the great four-miler, Gray Eagle. 

Can anyone give us the breeding of a mare called 
Carrie L., that was trained at San Jose about twelve 
years ago by B. O. Van Bokkelen? A subscriber is 
anxious to know. 

K. T. — Can you give me the breeding of San Juan 
2:22%. Ans.— San Juan 2:22% is a bay stallion 
foaled 1901, was sired by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, out 
of Rowena McKinney by McKinney 2:11%; second 
dam Judy Fee by Pilot Prince 20439. He was bred 
by Prof. E. P. Heald, of this city. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6, 1912. 



1 NOTES AND NEWS | 

Lady Suffolk, the first 2:30 performer, trotted in 
1845. 

Ninety and nine pacers entered the standard list 
in 1911. 



Not a single new 2:10 pacer or trotter o£ 1911 was 
bred in Pennsylvania. 



Start the New Year right by subscribing for the 
"Breeder and Sportsman." 

T. E. Pollock, Flagstaff, Ariz., is the owner of the 
pacing mare Blanche 2:06%. 



There are not forty thoroughbred stallions left in 
Kentucky, where there were hundreds in 1907. 



Remember, entries for the State Fair Futurity 
Stakes will close February 1st. Don't overlook this! 



McKinney 2:11% is the sire of 13 trotters and 10 
pacers with records below 2:10; also sire of the 
dams of six pacers in the "charmed circle." 



VVm. Land, one of the oldest members of the State 
Agricultural Society, passed away last week at his 
home in Sacramento. The deceased was a noted 
hotel man and universally liked. 



Will G. Durfee has a full brother to that great pac- 
ing mare Blanche 2:06%, which he calls Aviator. 
There is another called The Aviator, with a mark 
of 2:18%, it is a pacer, also, by Milton S. 2:08%. 



Carlokin trotted a mile in 2:09% over the new track 
at Los Angeles, while Zulu Belle, the Pettigru mare 
that Will Durfee drove, paced a mile the same day 
(Christmas) in 2:10. She has no marks as a pacer 
but will get one this year. 



Contrary to report, the racing days of R. Ambush 
2:09% are not at end, despite the purchase of the 
trotter by Tangner & Brosius for stud purposes. 
After his stud season he will be trained and raced 
over the mile tracks. 



There are one hundred and thirty foals at the Wal- 
nut Hall Farm. They are the get of Walnut Hall 
2:08%, Moko, San Francisco 2:07% and Ozono. 
Everyone looks like a winner. 



It was semi-officially announced a few days ago 
that the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Asso- 
ciation has decided to change the Kentucky Futurity 
for three-year-old trotters from a three in five heat 
race to a two in three heat event. 



Sister Florentine 2:08%, pacer, by Consternaro, 
that was at Pleasanton last fall, has been purchased 
for breeding purposes by Walnut Hall Stock Farm, 
She will be bred to Moko. 



It is claimed that the mile paced by Saladin 2:09% 
over the Wilmington, Del., track in 1893, was the 
first mile ever recorded better than 2:10 over a two- 
lap ring. 



The meeting of horsemen and delegates from the 
trotting associations on this coast that have been 
notified by Mr. Shirley Christy of Phoenix, Arizona, 
will take place at the Palace Hotel in this city, 
Thursday, January 18th. 

The Midwinter auction sale to be held by Fasig- 
Tipton Company at Madison Square Garden, New- 
York City, takes place February 6th, 7th, 8th and 
9th. As it is the last to be held at this historic 
place it promises to be one of the best. 



Harry Hersey, for eight years trainer of Dan Patch 
1:55%, and other members of the campaigning sta- 
ble of M. W. Savage's International Stock Farm, 
Savage, Minn., has resigned, to take effect January 
1. Ned McCarr, who developed Dazzle Patch the past 
season, takes Hersey's place. 

John Toy, of West Philadelphia, owner of the stal- 
lion, Owyho 2:07%, by Owyhee, dam Bertha, the 
greatest of brood mares, by Alcantara, and a number 
of other speed prospects, has decided to send the stal- 
lion to H. R. Tyson, at Newark, Del., to winter and 
race next season. 



A. L. Blackwell, trainer at the Sierra Vista Stock 
Farm, Chino, writes that his horses are rounding 
to in fine shai>e for this time of the year and that 
he will take at least twelve trotters and pacers to 
the Los Angeles track this spring and hopes to make 
a showing with taem. 



Just prior to leaving for New York City to sell his 
horse Kinney Lou 2:07%, Mr. Budd Doble was mar- 
ried in San Jose to a most estimable lady (Mrs. 
R ticker), and on their return from their honeymoon 
they stopped at Los Angeles to see Mr. Doble's 
(laughter, and from there journeyed to Hemet where 
they occupy a very pretty home and are as happy as 
every true friend of the genial little gentleman and 
1 is bride can wish them. 



Royal McKinney's record should be 2:29%, in- 
stead of 2:15%. That makes this good stallion eli- 
gible to the 2:30 class, but it does not prevent him 
from getting a mark of 2:15 or better which he will 
obtain if no illness or accident prevents. 



Of the new- 2:10 pacers of 1911, twenty-seven were 
bred west of the Missouri river, sixteen in California, 
three each in Colorado and Kansas, two in Ne- 
braska, and one each in Montana, Oklahoma, and 
Texas. Dick V. 2:08%, by Silkwood p. 2:07, believed 
by many to have been bred in Kansas, was bred in 
California. 



The trotting horse industry is not languishing— on 
the contrary it is growing in importance with each 
season's racing and why? Futurities! That explains 
it briefly and to the point. This being true then, why 
not adopt Bascomb's slogan of "going while the going 
is good," and prepare to patroniz i the futurities 
of 1912? 



The Pacific district of the National Trotting Asso- 
ciation, comprises the States of California, Oregon, 
Nevada, Washington, Montana, Colorado, Idaho, 
Utah, and the provinces of British Columbia, Ath- 
abaska, Alberta, and Saskatchewan in the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 



F. D. Meyers, former owner of Belle Medium 2:20, 
and a number of other good ones, recently brought 
two fine Kentucky bred saddle horses from Los An- 
gesles to Hemet where he has several others and will 
undoubtedly make his home there. Mr. Meyers and 
Hudd Doble will often compare notes of their ex- 
periences with trotters. 



The Spring Valley Water Company recently pur- 
chased nearly the entire valley adjacent to the city 
of Pleasanton and will divide it into small farms 
just as soon as the leases expire. This assures a 
bright future for Pleasanton. The company has also 
declared it will not purchase any more property 
there, so the Pleasanton race track will remain 
as it is, one of the best in America. 



The "Horse Review" is advocating the publishing 
of a supplemental chapter in the Year Book which 
would contain a list of all full and corrected pedi- 
grees that have heretofore been given as unknown 
or are erroneous. The idea is a most excellent one 
and will receive the aid and unqualified endorsement 
of every turf writer in the United States. We trust 
the Registry Association will adopt the idea. 



Dennie Neyland has sold to Far Western parties, 
through Jlmmie McQuillan, of Bozeman, Mont., the 
three-year-old colt, Benboe, by Bingen 2:06%, out 
of Nonita 2:17%. Benboe is a first-class individual 
and something of a trotter, as Dennie worked him 
better than 2:30 as a two-year-old and quarters in 33 
seconds. McQuillan, who is a Boston reared young 
trainer, will have Benboe and will winter with the 
balance of his stable in California. — American Sports- 
man. 



A starter should not be a judge. In the event of a 
close finish, or any change being made, the entire 
blame falls on his head, and why? Everyone knows 
who the starter is, and nine out of every ten attend- 
ing races, thinks he runs the entire outfit, so heap all 
blame on his head. Its unpleasant to hear adverse 
criticism when one's friends be the starters, and also 
places the starting judge in a place where the public 
never exactly appreciate him. 



A splendid opportunity is afforded horsemen to pur- 
chase or lease the perfectly proportioned standard 
bred stallion Unimak (full brother to Sterling Mc- 
Kinney 2:06%). His pedigree and description is 
published in our business columns. There is a mire 
by him at Woodland that can trot in 2:16 and several 
colts like her are marvels of symmetry and perfect 
gaited trotters. As Unimak has breeding, color, size, 
l>erfect trotting action and a splendid disposition, he 
will be a valuable acquisition to anyone and will pay 
for himself the first season. 

A New York dispatch says: "As a result of the 
statement of Gen. Leonard Wood to congress, that 
legislation hostile to horse racing in this department 
of the United States army by causing the removal of 
important studs to European countries, another at- 
tempt will be made to have the New York legislature 
repeal laws which killed horse racing." Any port 
in a storm. General Wood may be long on military- 
matters, but he is very short in horse affairs. The 
trotting horse breeders can furnish the government 
with the best of cavalry horses, if Uncle Sam is will- 
ing to pay living prices. 



Mr. Chris Smith, of Menlo Park, former owner of 
the beautiful stallion Abbottsford 2:19, She 2:12%, 
and a number of other good trotters, recently pur- 
chased the brown gelding Charley T. 2:10% by Zom- 
bro 2:11, dam Sarah Benton (dam of Ella Madison 
2:12%) by Albion 5514, grandam Bessie by Inca 557, 
and those who remember this horse while he was on 
the circuit would hardly recognize him. He has filled 
out and weighs at least 100 pounds more, and, as a 
show horse, will compare favorably with anyone ever 
sired by Zombro. Mr. Smith says he never saw a 
more intelligent or pleasant roadster and he would 
sooner drive him than handle the best automobile 
ever made. He intends to take him to this 
ci*y in a few months and use him on the park drives. 



We regret to hear that Mr. VVm. Hendrickson, 
one of our pioneer horsemen, who lives at Pleasanton, 
met with quite a serious accident last Saturday. He 
was driving a fine colt by McKena from Pleasanton 
to the race track when a portion of the harness 
broke, the horse took fright and ran away, throwing 
Mr. Hendrickson out and fracturing one of his ribs. 
At last accounts he was doing nicely, but it will be 
sometime before he will be able to drive. 



The Toomey sulkies and carts, and the Frazier 
track sulkies, which are offered at such ridiculously 
low prices at Studebakers', should "go like hot 
cakes," for bargains like these may never come 
within the reach of horsemen again. Just think of 
it, a Frazier sulky for $80, and a Toomey for the 
same price, while a Toomey low seat pneumatic 
track cart, just the thing for matinees, for $70, and 
a gent's nobby Toomey pneumatic cart for $60. 



There w-ere several sons and daughters of Elmo 
2:27 shipped to Australia and New Zealand, and 
their descendants have figured in many races and 
proven their worth as trotters and pacers, viz: Judge 
Belden, Doncaster, Lady Elmo, Ben hur (brother to 
Alfred S. 2:16%), Bonnie Clara, Mountain Maid, 
Hattie Weir, and Strideaway. One sire, Lord Elmo, 
is very popular in New Zealand, his grandam was 
Lady Elmo by Elmo. 



In a short time the formal announcement will come 
from Lexington that the Kentucky Trowing Horse 
Breeders' Association has given ear to popular 
clamor and changed the racing condition of its 
famous futurity from the best three in five to the best 
two in three heats. This step never would have 
been taken had the affairs of the association re- 
mained in the hands of men who controlled it a year 
or so ago, for they did not breed nor did they race 
colts, hence they knew only the one side of it — 
profit for the race track. 



Jos. H. Neal, of Pleasanton, who was for many 
years superintendent of the Pleasanton Stock Farm, 
and Monroe Salisbury's right hand man, sends the 
following toast for the "Breeder and Sportsman": 
"May the good old times of the past be sc» far over- 
shadowed by the future that they will fall into obli- 
vion and sleep the sleep of the just, and when they 
awaken in 1915 they will say 'we used to think we 
knew what horse raising and horse racing was, but 
in view of the present, the past was an iridescent 
dream.' " 



"I am a great stickler for well-bred trotters or 
pacers," writes a Colorado trainer, "and am through 
with the short-bred ones. It is up-hill business try- 
ing to race horses that are always looking for short 
miles and very hard to convince their owners that 
they won't do to race. When slow miles are in 
order, early in the spring, you may be able to show 
an owner a fast quarter, or even half, and after that 
it is impossible to explain to said owner why the 
horse cannot go and race his miles out like a stout- 
bred one can." 



The Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Associa- 
tion announces that 965 weanlings have been kept 
eligible to the twenty-second renewal of the rich 
Kentucky Futurity for foals of 1911, on second pay- 
ment, which was due December 7. The list shows 
an increase of nearly 100 over the list received last 
December. The nominations come from 36 States and 
Canada, the largest Canadian nominator being Miss 
Katherine L, Wilkes, and her eligibles are mostly 
the get of the coming young sire Kentucky Todd. 
There are 309 breeders represented in the list, only 
38 of whom have as many as five entries, thus show- 
ing that the small breeders are taking an interest 
in racing and nominating their mares. 

Daniel J. Campau, who inaugurated the classic M. 
and M. stake, the feature of the Grand Circuit races 
in Detroit, makes announcement of The Horseman 
and Spirit of the Times Futurity for foals of 1912. 
In addition to the guaranteed value of $20,000 and the 
customary divisions for three-year-old trotters and 
pacers and two-year-old trotters, it makes a place 
for four-year-old trotters and for three-year-old re- 
cords on half-mile tracks. The division of the stake 
is as follows: Three-year-old trotters, $10,000; three- 
year-old pacers, $2000; two-year-old trotters, $3000; 
four-year-old trotters, $3000; three-year-old records on 
half-mile tracks, $2000. The three-year-old trot and 
pace and the four-year-old trot will be on the three- 
heat plan and the two-year-old trot best two in three 
heats. Entries will close on March 15, 1912. 



Mr. Sanford Gordon, who is now a contractor in 
Vancouver, B. C, is a very enthusiastic follower of 
the light harness sport. He is a former resident 
of Buffalo, N. Y., and while there built the grand 
stand for the Buffalo track. He was a close friend 
and associate of the late C. .1. Hamlin during the 
years when the Village Farm was the greatest nur- 
sery of harness race horses in the world. Mr. Gor- 
don is the owner of the handsome little bay mare 
Just It Sure 2:19% by Nearest, dam by Danton Moul- 
trie 17064. She took her record as a three-year-old 
at Sacramento in a. walk-over for a stake; earlier 
in the season she started in a three-year-old stake 
at Santa Rosa, got third money and finished second 
the third heat in 2:14%. Mr. Gordon will matinee 
her next season and breed her to some good stallion 
in British Columbia. That she will be well driven 
is sure, for her owner gave Belle T. 2:10% her re- 
cord in 1895. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



Belwin McKinney 2: 21 %, the fastest and the high- 
est priced yearling of 1911, is at Hamburg Piace. 
John E. Madden made the statement Wednesday 
afternoon that he had that day paid Jacob S. Estill 
$8000 for the colt, for the account of his sons, Edward 
and Joseph Madden. This sum is $500 in advance of 
the $7500 for which the son of McKinney 2:11% 
and Belle Winnie (4) 2:25, by Adbell (1) 2:28, was 
knocked down to him at the Old Glory sale a fort- 
night ago. W. J. Andrews will train Belwin McKin- 
ney, as he will also that other good young trotting 
prospect, the colt by Vice Commodore 2:11, dam 
Fanella 2:13, by Arion (4) 2:07%, which under 
the name of John E. Madden, got a record of 2:27 
here the past fall. Mr. Madden bought this colt 
several days ago and he says his name will be 
changed to Magowan, in appreciation of James R. 
Magowan. who owned and named the colt, and for 
whom he trotted to his record. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Dr. O. J. Osborn, one of the best qualified veter- 
inarians in California, has located at Hemet, where 
he has fitted up a splendidly equipped hospital with 
all the latest paraphernalia; undoubtedly he will soon 
have a fine practice. 



RACING AT RIVERSIDE 



W. F. Whittier returned to San Franciscco last 
Friday for Christmas, after spending only a few days 
in Hemet. He spent most of his time looking after 
improvements at the stock farm while here, which 
are now about all made and places the buildings at 
the farm in the most convenient condition possible. 
The building and painting is now all finished and a 
handsome goldleaf weathervane in the shape of an 
exact replica of Wilbur Lou, the world's chain pion 
yearling trotting stallion, has been erected. This gilt 
adornment flashes from the top of Wilbur Lou's sta- 
ble and can be seen from a long distance. The men's 
club house has been completed and now has a first- 
class bath, lockers for the clothing and a fine sitting 
room. The blacksmith shop is also properly ac- 
ranged and is one of the best of its kind in the 
country. It is made with all the advantages that fit 
it particularly for trotting horse shoeing and every- 
thing is perfected to make this end of the work com- 
plete. — Hemet News. 



When the progressive rule barring hopples was 
adopted by the National and American trotting asso- 
ciations it was made mandatory. Last season the 
rule forbid the use of hopples on three-year-olds, but 
a few of the half-mile track associations advertised 
that hopples would be allowed in their three-year- 
old classes. It happened in a few instances that 
these races were won by hoppled three-year-olds and 
owners of free-legged colts in the race carried the 
case to the National Trotting Association. The lat- 
ter has ruled that the hoppled three-year-olds are 
not entitled to any money and has ordered the win- 
ning redistributed. It is evident from this action 
that the parent associations are in earnest in regard 
to enforcing the rule against hopples, but whether 
they can successfully cope with the situation next 
year when the rule applies to four-year-olds is an- 
other question. It is known that many of the half- 
mile track associations throughout the East are 
very anxious to allow the hopples on four-year-olds 
and it is said that some of the individual associa- 
tions will advertise that fact. Whether there are 
enough associations desiring to allow the use of 
hopples to force the parent associations to rescind 
the rule is an open question. 



Fasig-Tipton Co. have reserved space in the new 
exhibition building to take the place of Madison 
Square Garden. Definite announcement of the 
new building was made last week. It will be near 
or adjoining the New York Central's new stations at 
Forty-seventh street and Lexington avenue.' Accord- 
ing to the early plans the structure will cost $2,000,- 
000, will seat 3000 more persons than the Garden 
and the arena will be 50 per cent larger than the 
present one. Contracts already have been closed 
with nearly twenty associations which give annual 
exhibitions. These shows will cover 200 days, 
which will mean a guaranteed income for the pro- 
moters of $200,000. James T. Hyde, representing 
the Madison Square Garden directors, is actively 
engaged in making the future arrangements for the 
new structure. Fasig-Tipton Co. was among the 
first to register their claim on the new building 
for their annual horse sales. The others were the 
circus representatives, the Poultry, Dog Show, 
Sportsman's Show, Real Estate, Electrical and a 
number of other business associations which give 
annual exhibitions. 



W. A. Shippee's good bay stallion Moses, by Moses 
S. 2:19%, out of a mare by Rajah, son of Sultan 
2:24, is being handled by that well-Known norseman, 
Jas. Thompson, at the Sacramento track and is 
doing remarkably well. Jim likes him and that 
is proof enough that Moses is fast and has the 
"git everything in sight" instinct very strongly 
developed. 



It is currently reported th?t W. E. D. Stokes, owner 
of the Patchen Wilkes Farm, intends to sell every 
horse he owns, with the exception of three fillies, at 
the Fasig-Tipton sale in February. His protracted ill- 
ness will prevent him from paying any attention to 
this beautiful farm. If the news of this sale proves 
true it is a matter of regret, for there has not been 
a more liberal patron of the trotting horse industry 
than he, and several shipments of trotters from Cali- 
fornia made through the late F. J. Kilpatrick, found 
splendid homes on his elegant farm in the Blue 
Grass region. Should the sale take place there should 
be a syndicate of horsemen formed here to attend it 
and Purchase Peter the Great 2:07%, Peter Donna 
(3) 2:14%, J. J. Audubon 2:19, or at least two car- 
loads of the young mares and colts to be offered, for 
they represent the acme of fashionable breeding and 
should find places here on the Pacific Coast where 
representatives of the blood that has made this farm 
famous are very scarce. There is a big consignment 
of yearlings from this farm to be sold at the Mid- 
winter sale, but the addition of their sires and dams 
will make it one of the greatest sales ever held 
in America. 



Mr. R. J. MacKenzie has decided not to ship the 
balance of his horses to Pleasanton this winter, as 
the season is late and he does not care to take 
them from the warm stables where they are, place 
them on the cars and run the risk of losing them in 
transit, as he did with two good ones that recently 
died at Ogden. Next fall he will ship all his horses 
earlier to Pleasanton. They will then avoid the ex- 
treme cold of the high altitudes of the Rocky Moun- 
tains and the Sierra Nevadas. Mr. MacKenzie 
started for Chicago last Tuesday and will be back :n 
California about the 18th of this month. 



Schuyler Walton has Mr. A. S. Kcllogg's good filly 
Verda Ray in his string of good ones at Fresno. 
She is the mare described in last week's issue as 
being in charge of C. E. Clark. Mr. Walton also 
has in his string of fourteen horses a two-year-old 
brother to Athasham 2:09% that is entered in all 
the futurities and gives every promise of adding 
honors to the fame of his remarkable sire, Athadon 
(1) 2:27 and the great broodmare Cora Wickersham. 
This colt belongs to Geo. L. Warlow and it would 
not be surprising if Schuyler does not capture a few 
futurity stakes with him. It is a habit he has. 



It is reported that the estat 
Uhlein has decided to dispose 
lion, The Harvester 2:01. The 
Hall 2:08% is on the market, 
of, it is said, to "the highest 
to the auctions. Last summer 
Billings wanted the horse, 
refused to put a price on him. 
the heirs and executors of Mr. 
decided to dispose of the ch 

o 

IT MUST HAVE BEE 



G 



e of the late August 
of the champion stal- 

great son of Walnut 

but will be disposed 
bidder" and not sent 
it was said that C. K. 

but that Mr. Uhlein 
It is now said that 

Uhlein's estate have 
ampion. 



N A BLUFF. 



The amazing degree of self-abnegation and lofty 
purpose which impelled the editor of a Western 
horse paper published in Chicago, to announce some 
weeks prior to the appearance of his annual Christ- 
mas number that paid write-ups of breeding farms 
and sensational horses would not be solicited, but 
would be featured at the expense of the publisher, 
is not difficult to understand after an inspection o' 
the pages of the special number referred to. So 
far as any elaborate representation of great farms 
or noted horses and horsemen is concerned, the 
case is a good deal like the story of snakes in Ire- 
land — there are none. Doubtless the harrassed and 
tormented owners of the horses which have achieved 
great fame and v on fabulous sums during the year 
are grateful for the immunity accorded them by our 
esteemed contemporary, but its readers may view 
the situation in a different light, and prefer to have 
had the features represented, even at the sacrifice 
of the dignity and moral heroism of the editor. At 
any rate, in the light of the subsequent develop- 
ments the unctuous assumption of superior virtue on 
the part of this horse editor and his supercilious 
rebuke to his less punctilious contemporaries turns 
out to be only a little cheap buffoonery. 

It is a strange and distorted — and in this case 
characteristic — conclusion which conceives any im- 
propriety on the part of a turf paper in asking the 
owners of important breeding farms or stallions 
which have won distinction to pay for the publicity 
accorded to them in its columns. These stallions 
and these farms are beneficiaries of this exploita- 
tion, and the conditions which have enabled them to 
be successful are to a largo degree created by the 
reports of the turf papers in building up and main- 
taining the interest in the sport upon which the 
stability of the breeding pursuit depends. Every 
turf paper devotes columns every year to famous 
stallions and prominent breeding farms Tor which 
no compensation whatever is sought or expected. 
II they should cease to do this, by concerted de- 
termination, the neglected owners would realize 
keenly the loss of the publicity and feel that they 
had a right to protest. There is not a farm, or a 
stallion, or a horse of any consequence anywhere 
in America that has not received from the turf 
papers hundreds of dollars' worth of free adver- 
tising for every cent's worth they have paid for. 
Pnder these circumstances it is asinim- to main- 
tain that the publisher of a turf paper who at great 
labor and large expense issues an annual special 
Dumber devoted to a showing of the resources and 
progress of the light harness sport and the breeding 
Industry, and asks the men who have been most suc- 
cessful and prominent during the year to be repre- 
sented therein and to pav lor their representation, 
is guilty of any impropriety or transgression of 
the ethics of the newspaper profession. No one 
ever suggested that idea except the Western horse 
editor referred to, and, as before stated, his high 
and mighty parade of generosity and magnanimity 
was only a bluff. — Trotter and Pacer. 



"Well, fellers, that was some hoss race, anyhow, 
wa'nt it?" was the phraseology indulged in by one 
enthusiastic old-timer who had just ceased laugh- 
ing over the manner in which the classy little Riv- 
erside horse. Monk, won the free pace from the 
Los Angeles competitors. Also there were several 
hundred others at the racing matinee on New Year's 
day, that were equally enthusiastic at the track. 
The Riverside Military band played during the lulls 
in the sport. 

"There couldn't have been a better combination 
for good racing sport than we had today," said Sec- 
retary W. L. Scott of the Riverside Driving Club 
to a Morning Enterprise man last evening. "The 
day, the track, the animals and the general condi- 
tions all favored good racing, and we had It— with 
close finishes that made 'em lean far out over the 
front of the grandstand to determine which was 
to be the winner." 

Fighting to maintain the record of the track, Monk 
captured the first heat of the free.for.all pace against 
the Los Angeles horse, Nordwell, with a mark of 
2:08%, and the celebrated Hal McKinney, boasting 
of having stepped it in 2:06%. In the second heat 
the plucky little Riverside horse, owned by II. Eigen. 
brod, came in third, but when the third heat was 
on she dug out of the pocket and coming down the 
stretch under a full head of steam and an abund- 
ance of ginger, took first place, while the crowds 
howled their applause, bandmen hammered the 
drums, and hats were thrown up by the admirers 
of the local winner. 

No less exciting was the finish of a number of the 
individual heats of the meeting, the 2:25 pace be- 
ing among the most pleasing to the big gathering. 
After ending in third place in the first heat, Auto 
Zombro took the second by a few feet and captured 
the third heat by a neck-and-neck finish wtih Zella 
Z., driven by Charles June. 

There were three horses here from Los Angeles, 
Nordwell, Auto Zombro and Midnight, and four from 
San Bernardino, Bolock, Mabel Van, Larry K. and 
Copper the Ore. Summaries: 

235 Trot: 

Miss Worth While, by Worth While 1 1 

Dark Streak 2 3 

Loretta 4 2 

Larry K 3 3 

Best Time, 2:33. 
Free-for-all Pace: 

Monk 1 3 1 

Hal McKinney 2 1 3 

Nordwell 3 2 2 

Best time, 2:16. 

2:25 Pace: 

Auto Zombro, by Zombro 3 1 1 

Betty Raymond 1 4 4 

Zella Z 5 2 2 

Harry H 2 5 4 

Lady Halford 4 3 3 

Midnight 6 6 

Best time, 2:22. 

Free-for-all trot: 

Mabel Van 1 1 

Bolock 2 2 

Emma Z 3 3 

Best time, 2:23. 

2:25 Mixed: 

Kid Downey 1 1 

Maud Wilkes 3 2 

Marigold 2 3 

Copper the Ore 4 4 

Best time, 2:31. 
Those who officiated during the matinee were the 
following: 

Judges — H. A. Hammond, Riverside; Theo. Holmes, 
San Bernardino; Budd Doble, Hemet. 

Timers — W. A. Hayt, Riverside; F. Vantress, San 
Bernardino; Dr. W. S. Rogen, Hemet. 

Starter— H. G. Stanley. 

Clerk of course — H. P. Zimmerman. — Morning En- 
terprise. 

o 

GOING TO SAN DIEGO. 

Keefer & Spencer, whose string of trotters have 
made Woodland famous, are preparing to remove 
their training and breeding stables to San Diego. 
They recently returned from a circuit that included 
Oregon, Washington, Illinois, Oklahoma, Texas, New 
Mexico and California, on which they were very suc- 
cessful. They have leased the Sweetwater track 
near San Diego and purchased seventy-five acres 
near the track. Spencer has gone to San Diego to 
construct a residence and to make other arrange- 
ments for removal. He will return for the norces 
and they will be taken south about the 1st of Febru- 
ary. The A. Brown trotting stable will also be taken 
along. Brown, who owns Woodland's track, will keep 
his broodmares, colts and stallions at Woodland, and 
A. B. Kenny will succeed Spencer as manager. Spen- 
cer has been Brown's trainer for eleven years. He 
has developed some great colts by the stallions Nush- 
agak and Prince Ansel. During the season Just 
closed he placed two horses in the 2:10 list, being 
one of four drivers in the United States to accom- 
plish that feat during tne year of 1911 

Attention is called to the advertisement of the 
gT»at green pacing mare Cella K. (trial 2:10%) and 
her full sister, a four-year-old, that is just as prom 
ising. There are no better "prospects" In Califor- 
nia and seekers after first. class racing material will 
do well to inspect these good ones. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[.Saturday, January 6, ]'J12. 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. D© W ITT. 

0^OOCmX)<><m>0<>C8Xm>O^^ 



FISH AND GAME COMMISSION NOTES. 

Frank M. Newbert of Sacramento was elected 
president of the State Fish and Game Commission, 
on motion of II. J. Connell at a meeting of the Com- 
mission held last Tuesday. Mr. Newbert was ap- 
pointed by Governor Johnson as a member or the 
board, vice David Starr Jordan, who resigned sev- 
eral months ago. He is the secretary of the Kiniball- 
Upson Company in Sacramento. 

Mr. Newbert is an ardent devotee of rod and gun, 
a champion trapshot, has a practical knowledge of 
game and fish affairs and is personally known to and 
popular with sportsmen in almost every county of the 
State. 

Carl Westerfeld, appointed by Governor Johnson 
several weeks ago in place of Fred D. Sanborn, re- 
signed, had his initial sitting as an executive mem- 
ber of the Empire Gun Club and the Exposition City 
Gun Club, and is in through rapport with the pro- 
tection and propagation measures tor our fish and 
game. 

M. J. Connell of Los Angeles is one of the leading 
sportsmen of the Angel City and has been prominent 
for several years past, as a staunch advocate and 
supporter of measures for the protection of fish and 
game in this State. 

The main office of the Commission is located in 
this city. A branch office has been recently estab- 
lished in Sacramento. For some time past the Los 
Angeles office has been of great efficiency in the 
administration of matters pertaining to the south- 
ern part of the State. A fourth office branch of the 
Commission is in active operation in Fresno. 

The increasing business of the Commission is thus 
being handled from four different points at the same 
time. Commissioner Newbert at Sacramento, Com- 
missioner Connell at Los Angeles, and Commissioner 
Westerfeld in this city enable executive action and 
dispatch of business to a material extent. Secre- 
tary Ernest Schaeffle is in charge of the San Fran- 
cnsco main office, and Deputy A. D. Ferguson con- 
ducts the Fresno office. 

The business meeting of the board Tuesday was 
adjourned at a late hour in the afternoon and to be 
concluded Wednesday. 

Among other things the finances of the board show 
a balance of $104,899.13 on hand. The expenses for 
November totaled $17,678.37. 

A report of the State Board of Control to the 
Commission showed by the recent expert examina- 
tion that the accounts, vouchers, expenditures, etc., 
were properly made and carried out, and, so to 
speak, showed a clean bill of health for the board. 

The Board of Control's system for accounts, 
vouchers and a detailed routine of documentary 
reference matter, for the mutual expediency of offi- 
cial business, was offered to and accepted by the 
Commissioners for future use in the offices of the 
board. 

Dr. C. H. Gilbert resigned as the Commission's trout 
and salmon expert. Future investigation in these 
lines will be conducted by W. H. Shebley, recently 
appointed superintendent of hatcheries, a piscicul- 
tural expert for 20 years in charge of the Sisson 
hatchery. 

The appointment of a superintendent of the Game 
Department of the commission, or head field deputy, 
it was intimated would come up before the board 
Wednesday. This important office has a number 
of applicants. Among those best posted it was inti- 
mated a "dark horse' may be the appointee. 

The secretary's report showed that for 1911 a total 
of 766 arrests for violations of the law were made — 
271 fish cases and 49a game cases. Of these there 
were convictions in 612 cases, with a total of $13,- 
593.50 in fines collected, together with jail sentences 
embracing 309 days. 

During the session Tuesday afternoon a commit- 
tee composed of President Dr. A. M. Barker of San 
Jose, Secretary E. A. Mocker of Capitola, Henry M. 
Keller of Los Angeles, Fred Foster of Han ford, H. 
Chase Hall of Corte Madera and Frank V. Bell of 
this city, representing the California State Fish and 
Game Protective Association, met the Commisisoners 
in conference over a proposed amalgamation of the 
State association with the newly projected county 
fish and game associations. 

The old-line State association has been in exist- 
ence ten years, has accomplished much good in fish 
and game legislation, and has, it is claimed, a mem- 
bership of 40,000 sportsmen. 

Since the subdivision of the State into six game 
districts, fish and game interests, while no less im- 
portant, were under the nature of the present laws, 
diversified in application and much in need of closer 
local attention. 

This new condition of affairs prompted the or- 
ganization of county fish and game associations — a 
project fathered by Commissioner Newbert and fos- 
tered by the Commission. The county organizations 
claim now a total membership of about 2000, acquired 
within a few months. 

So far as actual joining of forces is concerned, the 
conference brought about nothing definite. The work 
of the new county clubs will receive co-operation 
from the State association — both organizations and 



their aims are acceptable to the Commission in aid- 
ing its work. 

The visiting delegation withdrew and held an exec- 
utive session shortly afterwards in the Palace 
Hotel, at which meeting, among other matters trans- 
acted, it was decided to hold the next annual con- 
vention of the California State Fish and Game Pro- 
tective Association in September at Hanford. 

There will be no change of location this year it was 
decided for the State Game Farm, now in operation at 
Haywards. 

The branch farm of thirty acres at Folsom will 
be used as a propagating and distributing depot, 
from which valley quail will be sent to restock dif- 
ferent localities where the birds have been thinned 

out. 

At the suggestion of Dr. T. S. Palmer of the Bio- 
logical Survey, Washington, D. C, experiments will 
be carried on at both establishments for the purpose 
of domesticating valley quail. That this can be ac- 
complished is sanguinely believed. Results in this 
line, although comparatively few, prove to a great 
degree the tractability and intelligence of the native 
quail to training and kindly treatment. Superintend- 
ent W. N. Dirks of the Haywards farm tamed and 
i rained a bevy of quail ai his Alameda home. It is 
believed that good results in this line can also be 
accomplished with mountain quail and sage hens. 



A statement in the Pleasanton Times regarding the 
State Game Farm is as follows: 

"The State Game Farm, threatened with removal 
to Folsom the past few weeks, is to stay in Alameda 
county. This decision was reached last week at a 
meeting with Governor Johnson and Senators Stet- 
son and Strobridge with Commissioner Newbert. 
The Folsom location will be used as a quail propa- 
gating depot. 

Whether this means that the farm is to remain 
at the Mt. Eden location has not been stated. From 
statements made some months ago it has appeared 
that trouble over the lease would necessitate the 
moving from present quarters about the first of the 
coming year. If this difficulty has been settled it has 
not been made public. In the event that it has not, 
and another location must be selected, it is to be 
hoped that the Sunol location will be thoroughly 
looked into before any other is decided upon. Sunol 
offers the grandest spot for the purpose of game 
propagation in Alameda county, removed from the 
denser populated districts of the bay plain and pro- 
tected from damp and chilling winds by mountains. 
Water of the purest quality, feed, both wild and cul- 
tivated, "cover" for birds and conditions as near to 
nature as can be found within a radius of miles 
and miles of San Francisco are a few of the induce- 
ments Sunol holds forth. 

The Times has asserted time and time again that 
the Commissioners will have a long lock to find a 
better place. It is sincerely to be hoped that the 
entire commission will at least visit Sunol* in the 
event they are compiled to move, ihe Spring Val- 
ley Water Company offers to aid in tne protection of 
any birds escaping from the farm and also will make 
to the State a nominal renting proposition, which 
may be accepted without fear of criticism from any 
source in Alameda county other than that which may 
arise from localities wishing the farm nearer them. 

Sunol does not want the farm unless it is possessed 
of every requirement necessary. These it believes it 
has. The Commissioners are again invited by the 
Times to look the field over.'' 

Game Birds Released. — Three pair of Hungarian 
partridges and two pair of "Bob Whites" arrived 
last week from Pennsylvania, consigned to C. L. 
Crellin and to be used for propagation purposes at 
his farm near Pleasanton. The birds arrived in first 
class condition and seemed glad to be liberated when 
their new owner opened the box and let them loose 
in the seven acre enclosure he has prepared for 
propagation purposes. All of the increase from the 
birds received last week will be allowed to go on 
open ground, the plan Mr. Crellin is adopting with 
the pheasants and other winged creatures he is rais- 
ing. 

Ducks are beginning to "work in" on the west 
side bay shore, and Belmont and San Mateo gunners 
are beginning to have a "look in" on the sport. Ed 
L. Hoag, Commander Reynolds and Bill Hogan were 
the Leslie Gun Club members shooting at the salt 
works preserve that were in the limit class a week 
ago for strings of sprig and wigeon. 

Hunters in the Los Banos country a fortnight Sat- 
urday and Sunday were numerous. The Saturday 
contingent had the best shooting. Plenty of new 
water in the valley flats have induced mallard, teal, 
widgeon and spomeys to tarry long. The sprigtails 
were nearly all gone from that section a week ago. 
This variety of the webfeet were to be seen by 
thousands in the Suisun bay and lower San Fran- 
cisco bay regions, taking comfortable daily siestas 
during the calm weather. 

This week it is reported that the valley section 
was pretty well deserted by the ducks. 



ECHOES FROM THE NORTHWEST. 

[By August Wolf] 

Harry Yarnell, an eastern Washington rancher, re- 
siding on Pine creek between Roosevelt and Bickle- 
ton, is making a highly profitable business out of 
trapping for fur-bearing animals during the winter 
months. A total of 37 prairie wolves and 11 bobcats 
represent the catch of bounty animals take,n from 
his "trap lines" in 27 days during the month of No- 
vember. In addition to the value of the furs, he re- 
ceived a bounty of $1 on coyotes and $5 on the 
bobcats. The estimated net value of the entire catch 
is close to $300. 

Mr. Yarnell does his trapping along the Columbia 
river, Pine creek, Rock creek and Squaw creek. His 
line of traps covers a total distance of 150 miles. He 
makes the rounds on horseback, with a pack horse 
to carry bait and the pelts of the animals ensnared. 
Six days are required to make the trip, and besides 
looking after his traps Mr. Yarnell has to kill jack- 
rabbits, which he uses for bait. 

In addition to animals caught in his traps, Mr. Yar- 
nell shoots many coyotes. He uses 350 traps and 
places them in sets of three, about 20 feet apart, 
around trees and covers them with dirt. He swings 
the carcass of the rabbits used for bait to a limb of 
the tree. He catches many of the bobcats in traps 
buried in trails without bait. Traps for bobcats are 
also placed in trees. 

He has trapped 82 bobcats since he came to 
Klickitat county in 1901, but has only seen'two of the 
animals before he caught them. 

In addition to coyotes and bobcats Yarnell catches 
coons, badgers, skunks, porcupines and eagles. He 
is also a taxidermist, and mounts the best specimens 
of the smaller animals and eagles that he catches. In 
his last catch he found an animal in eacn trap of 
two seets, getting three bobcats and three coyotes 
out of six traps. In 1910 he trapped 100 skunks at 
Grand Dalles in two weeks. These pelts brought him 
95 cents each. 



The annual rabbit hunt started at Wilson Creek, 
Wash., December 27. Two hundred started on the 
chase. A fresh fall of snow during the night made 
the conditions ideal for a successful hunt and it was 
expected that a large number of bunnies would be 
captured. The country was thoroughly covered for 
a radius of 10 miles, and the rabbits driven toward 
the town, where the final roundup was held, late in 
the afternoon. Last year over 400 rabbits were 
killed at the annual hunt. Nearly all of these were 
shipped to Spokane and turned over to the Salvation 
Army for distribution among the poor. A big celebra- 
tion in the form of a dance and supper wound up 
the hunt in the evening. 



Secretary John T. Little of the Inland Empire 
Game Protective Association is planning a big coy- 
ote drive between Sprague and Lamont, Wash., early 
in January, a number of farmers in that vicinity re- 
porting that the pests are particularly numerous 
there. "With a party of from 30 to 50 men, starting 
from four different points and driving toward a cen- 
tral spot, a district of 10 miles can be covered and 
plenty of sport insured the hunters," states Mr. Lit- 
tle. "I have had much experience in this sport in 
Kansas and there is no reason why a drive of this 
kind cannot be pulled off here." 

Fred Hoesly killed a timber wolf near Eastport, 
Idaho, several days ago, bringing down a big 
70 pounder with a shotgun. He took one shot at the 
wolf and finished it with another load when it started 
to attack him. 



That the waters of the lakes and streams in the 
Inland Empire are the best in the United States for 
the propagation and growth of the Eastern brook 
trout, is the opinion of G. Hansen of Osceola, Wis., 
who is the owner of one of the largest trout plants 
in the country. Mr. Hansen is spending the holidays 
in Spokane with his brother. Otto Hansen. He is 
loud in his praise of fishing condtiions in the Inland 
Empire. Hansen has furnished over 5,000,000 East- 
ern brook trout eggs to the Spokane Fish Protec- 
tive association in the last five years. A shipment 
of 50,000 eggs was received by Secretary Wieseman 
from his plant last week. They were sent to the 
Little Spokane hatchery and will be planted in the 
Spokane river next spring. 

A big rabbit hunt has been scheduled by the 
Inland Empire Fish Protective Association to be held 
February 18 and a championship trophy cup will 
be awarded to the hunter making the best bag for 
the day. Every entrant will register with the secre- 
tary before starting on the hunt and alho after the 
day's sort. As the hunters return the game will be 
counted and the winner decided. This will be the 
first shoot under the auspices of the Inland Empire 
Fish Protective Association, and will probably be 
followed by others before the close of the season. 
The winner's cup will be donated by the association. 



Danny McCarter, a baseball player, and Ed. eJss- 
mer, bagged two deer near Priest Lake, Idaho, re- 
cently. The season just ended has been by far the 
most successful in recent Idaho history, only ex- 
ceeded by the enormous "killings" reported in Mon- 
tana. 

Thirty hunters killed 250 rabbits in the Columbia 
Flat Gun Club's second drive on the Smith ranch, 
twelve miles west of Mesa, Wash., a few days ago. 
After the drive L. D. Smith, assisted by the wives 
and daughters of the neighbors, served a dinner. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



Sportsmen in Spokane and other parts of eastern 
Washington have been invited to take part in the 
big "varmint" hunt to take place in Pierce county 
in December, January and February. Twelve cash 
prizes are offered by the Pierce County Game and 
Fish Protective Association, and it is expected that 
the hunt will be the biggest affair of its kind ever 
held in the West. For killing a cougar a hunter will 
be credited with 2500 points, while the lowest pos- 
sible number of points allowed is five for killing an 
English sparrow. The prizes range from $50 to 
$5. 



The Game Protective League of Okanogan, Wash., 
has forwarded letters to the federal authorities upon 
the subject of transporting elk from Wyoming, where 
their numbers are extensive. Officers oi the United 
States Department of Agriculture hrve written that 
elk could be secured for the Okanogan forest, pro- 
viding enclosures were made that would insure the 
safety and feeding of the animals. An endeavor 
will be made to convince the authorities that it is 
unnecessary to keep elk in an enclosure here as 
the Okanogan forest is a natural breeding place 
for elk and deer, the snowfall being light and the 
winters mild in comparison with their present abode 
in Wyoming. 

Scores of wolves and coyotes were killed during 
the drive in the Grand Dalles district of Klickitat 
county, Wash , on December 3. The drive was 
planned by stockmen, headed by Leo F. Burns, 
owner of the Loma Alta ranch, and 25,000 acres were 
covered, the hunters following the quarry on horse- 
back. Besides one hundred local men there were 
hunters from The Dalles, Vancouver, Portland, Walla 
Walla and Spokane. Coyotes, which abound in 
large numbers cn account of the sheepfolds, are 
more plentiful than ever this year, as many as seven 
having been seen in one hand. 

Rabbit driving with the gunment and brush beaters 
in high-power automobiles is a popular sport in 
Franklin county, Wash. B. F. Short, formerly of 
Spokane, now a resident of Pasco, had charge of 
the first drive in December, when hundreds of long 
ears turned somersaults. Short says it jis real 
sport, adding that when a marksman is traveling 
thirty-five miles an hour in a machine and the rabbit 
is doing from seventy to 100, it takes a cracking 
good shot to get his target. Expert trap shooters ac- 
knowledge that the sport is the best they have ever 
experienced. 



Charles Best of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, killed a cou- 
gar weighing 150 pounds near that city on Decem- 
ber 5. The hide measured seven feet from tip to 
tip. He received $15 bounty from the county. 

M. Dickey, a trapper at Colfax, Wash., recently 
killed three timber wolves, on which the bounty is 
$15 each; one bobcat on which the bounty is $5, 
and three coyotes, on which the State paid a bounty 
of $1 each. 



A party of seven Rathdrum Idaho, hunters re- 
turned recently from a two weeks' hunting trip at 
Priest Lake Idaho. They bagged 14 deer and 'one 
black bear They report a good time, though the 
snow wa sfour feet deep, 
snow was four feet deep. 

Since the expiration of the hunting season in Mon- 
tana the deer have been returning to the valleys in 
large numbers and are reported to be causing consid- 
erable damage to orchards and haystacks in various 
localities. 

AMERICAN GAME PROTECTIVE AND PROPA- 
GATION ASSOCIATION. 



Over three thousand dollars, mostly in payment 
of one dollar yearly membership dues, have already 
been received by the American Game Protective and 
Propagation Association, according to figures given 
out last week from its offices at 111 Broadway, New 
York. Although little more than two months have 
elapsed since its incorporation, the Association has 
lent valuable aid to the cause of game protection, 
and sportsmen from all over the country, realizing 
the necessity for prompt and concentrated action if 
our fish and game are to be saved from extinction, 
are hastening to enlist under the National standard. 
Over a dozen life, and a number of club member- 
ships have been secured. 

The New York Fish, Game and Forest League, 
which counts among its members most of the local 
clubs of the State, and which has been very influen- 
tial in securing the enactment of good legislation, 
joined the new Association by the unanimous vote of 
the annual convention held recently in Schenectady. 

Canada, and almost every State in the Union, have 
furnished members, paying from one to one hundred 
dollars a year. Memberships are secured on the fol- 
lowing basis: Associate, one dollar or more an- 
nually; Club, five dollars or more annually; Life, one 
hundred dollars at one time; Patron, one thousand 
dolars; and Benefactor, twenty-five thousand dollars. 

The funds derived in this way, together with an 
income of $25,000 subscribed by manufacturers, is ad- 
ministered by experts trained in the profession of 
game and fish protection and propagation. They 
stand ready to give their support to any good cause 
for the furtherance of these ends 

Among the things already accomplished by the As- 
sociation is a complete re-organization of the pin 
tective forces of one State where a special agent 
spent ten days, during which time more convictions 



were secured against violators than in the preceding 
ten months. The agents work with the local authori- 
ties, in most cases turning over all evidence to them 
so that they may obtain the convictions. 

The president of the Association, John B. Burn- 
ham, who has for years been identified with pro- 
tective work, and who is an authority on game laws, 
has been asked by the State of New York to assist 
in codifying its laws. He is one of a committee of 
three engaged in this work. 

Reports of local conditions, which members have 
sent in, are strikingly similar. Inadequate or con- 
flicting laws, poorly enforced, are the rule almost 
everywhere. Laxity in the enforcement of game laws 
is often due to considerations of local politics from 
which the Association's special agents are immune, 
and are therefore able to obtain evidence against, 
and prosecute violators, where the county or State 
officers would not do so. In other cases the local 
authorities are simply handicapped by lack of funds 
and are too glad of the assistance of the Association's 
trained men. 

Another of the commonest obstacles in the way 
of bringing to justice those who are ruthlessly 
despoiling the country of the game which rightfully 
belongs to all the people, is inertia on the part of a 
public as yet unawakened to the disastrous results 
which are sure to follow this despoilation. If the 
community under his surveillance is not behind him, 
a warden can accomplish little. The Association's 
agents are active in spreading the gospel of game 
protcetion among those who do not realize its ne- 
cessity. 

The interest that, has been manifested from the 
start, and the loyal support which sportsmen and 
others have accorded to the American Game Protect- 
ive and Propagation Association, shows that the peo- 
ple are ready to take the same position in the matter 
of saving our wild life that they have taken towards 
the conservation of some of our natural resources. 
Nothing but united effort can save the fish and game. 
The business of the National Association is to organ- 
ize as well as to exert this effort. 

o 

MILITARY SCHOOL RIFLE SHOOTING LEAGUE 
OF THE UNITED STATES. 



List of schools represented, season of 1912, the 
rifle club secretary and the N. R. A. judge. 

Columbia (Tenn.) Military Academy, R. D. Garner, 
Lieut. W. H. Westmorland, U. S. 4. 

Harvard Military School, Los Angeles, Cal., H. M. 
Fletcher, Mr. H. M. Fletcher. 

Hitchcock Military Academy, San Rafael, Cal., W. 
H. Edmands, Maj. S. J. Halley. 

Marist College, Atlanta, Go., L. Bramen, Maj. E. 
R. Schmidt. 

Miami Military Institute, Germantown, Ohio, F. J. 
Moterman, Lieut. C. R. Street, U. S. A. f retired). 

Mt. Tamalpais Military Academy, San Rafael, Cal., 
Maj. N. F. Vanderbilt, C. N. G. 

N. Y. Military Academy, Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. 
Y., Douglas Leslie, Mr. Geo. S. Clark. 

Northwestern Military Academy, Highland Park, 
111.. W. Thode, Maj. R. P. Davidson, I. N. G. 

St. Johns Military Academy, Delafield, Wis., John 
Saunders, Lieut. C. F. Severson, U. S. A. 

Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Mo., 
Warren E. Dewey, Capt. G. B. Pritchard, Jr., U.S.A. 
Schedule of Matches. 

January 13th — Columbia vs. Harvard, Hitchcock 
vs. St. John's, Marist vs. Northwestern, Miami vs. 
N. Y. Military, Mt. Tamalpais vs. Wentworth. 

January 20th — Columbia vs. Hitchcock, Harvard vs. 
Wentworth, Marist vs. St. John's, Miami vs. North- 
western, Mt. Tamalpais vs. N. Y. Military. 

January 27th — Columbia vs. Marist, Harvard vs. 
Hitchcock, Miami vs. St. John's Mt. Tamalpais vs. 
Narthwestern, Wentworth vS*. N. Y. Military. 

February 3d — Columbia vs. Miami, Harvard vs 
Marist, Hitchcock vs. Wentworth, Mt. Tamalpais 
vs. St. John's, N. Y. Military vs. Northwestern. 

February 10th — Columbia vs. Mt. Tamalpais, Har- 
vard vs. Miami, Hitchcock vs. Marist, N. Y. Military 
vs. St. John's, Northwestern vs. Wentworth. 

February 17th — Columbia vs. N. Y. Military, Har- 
vard vs. Mt. Tamalpais, Hitchcock vs. Miami, North- 
western vs. St. John's, Wentworth vs. Marist. 

February 24th — Columbia vs. Northwestern, Har- 
vard vs. N. Y. Military, Hitchcock vs. Mt. Tamalpais. 
Marist vs. Miami, St. John's vs. Wentworra. 

March 2d— Columbia \ St. John's, Harvard vs. 
Northwestern, Hitchcock vs. N. Y. Military, Marist 
vs, Mt. Tamalpais, Miami vs. Wentworth. 

March 9th — Columbia vs. Wentworth, Harvard vs. 
St. John's, Hitchcock vs. Northwestern, Marist vs. 
N. Y. Military, Miami vs. Mt. Tamalpais. 

Conditions Governing the Competitions. 

Eligibility: Open to teams from rifle clubs rep- 
resenting a military school or a private school hav- 
ing a military department, affiliated with the Na. 
tion.it] Hide Association and in good standing. Any 
number of club members up to ten may shoot on 
the team, the best five scores to count for the team's 
record score. 

Distance: Fifty feet from end of ride to target. 

Number of Shots: Twenty for record. Ten stand- 
ing and ten prone, ten shots on a target, DO sighting 
shots. 

Target: The N. R. A. gallery target. One to ten 
count to be used. Official stamped targets, furnished 
by the N. R. 9., must be used. No other targets will 
be received for record. Used targets will be held 
subject to call by the N. H. A. 

Position: Standing — offhand, body and rifle must, 
be free from all artificial support. Prone — head 
toward target, rifle, forearm and band must be free 



from all artificial support. Use of strap not allowed 
in either position. 

Rifle: Any .22 caliber rifle, weighing not over ten 
pounds. 

Sights: Any, in front of the firing pin, not con- 
taining glass. 

Trigger Pull: Not to be less than three pounds. 

Ammunition: .22 caliber short. 

Time Allowance: Ten minutes will be allowed 
for each string of ten shots. 

Judges: A judge appointed by the N. R. A., or his 
representative, will supervise the shooting of all 
matches and certify to the scores made. He will 
see that all conditions are adhered to, determine 
the score and report same to the N. R. A. by mail 
on the official blank at the completion of each month. 
He will take charge of the official targets, before 
and after the match. 

Matches, When Shot: Harvard School, Hitch, 
cock Military Academy, Mt. Tamalpais Military 
Academy and St. John's Military Academy will shoot 
on Monday of each week or the Saturday preceding 
if preferred; Wentworth Military Academy, Miami 
Military Institute and . .orth western Military Acad- 
emy on Tuesday and Columbia Military Academy, 
Marist College and N. Y. Military Academy on 
Wednesday or before. 

Entrance Fee: Three dollars per team. 

Prize: To the team winning the most number of 
matches a plaque emblematic of the military school 
rifle shooting team championship and five silver 
medals to the individual members of the team. 

Note: The Interscholastic Indoor Championship 
Team Match for the Astor Cup for 1912 will be held 
during the week ending April 20th. 

DOGDOM NOTES. 

A request to give some information as to the origin 
of the pointer and where it came from affords an 
opportunity to attack a whole lot of very errone- 
ous conclusions, which have been passed along by 
writer after writer, apparently for no other reason 
than that no one has ever taken the trouble to make 
any personal investigation, but preferred the easy 
way of all predecessors by saying tne pointer orig- 
inally came from Spain. We got our pointers from 
England, of that there is no question, but to say 
that the English pointer came from Spain is alto, 
gether wrong. Some reached there from Spain; 
that needs no discussion, but all latin Europe had 
pointers, and so had Germany, and so had England, 
writes James Watson in the Philadelphia Enquirer. 
I am pretty well convinced that Italy first negan 
shooting flying and made use of the dog we now call 
pointers. That country was well ahead of any other 
in the development of what the English called the 
fowling piece, and I had a small engraving which 
dated back well towards 1600 by an Italian artist 
representing shooting at flying partridges with point, 
ers in front of the sportsmen. Not only that, but in 
Jacobbo Bassano's painting of Moses striking the 
rock, which is in the Dresden gallery, there is an 
excellent representation of a liver and white pointer, 
a dog quite fit, to put in the ring with dogs of the 
present day. 

Bassano takes us back to 1550, as he was born in 
1510, and died in 1592. It is no fancy picture. I 
mean to say it must have been either a dog he well 
knew or it was a typical dog of the period. In the 
picture there are a white Arabian horse, a mule, a 
donkey, two lambs, a rabbit and a rooster, all so true 
to life that it would take the very best of our pres- 
ent day animal painters to do anything like equal 
work. Then you need only say that a man who 
would so faithfully represent all these animals must 
be credited with faithfully reproducing things he 
knew well. There was no use for the pointer as a 
pointer until the quick-firing gun began to be devel- 
oped up to which time guns were fired from a rest, 
and the process of firing the gun was slow and called 
for several different things to be done to fire the 
powder. Even when the improvement came there 
was nothing like what we have, or even what our 
grandparents had in the flint lock, but it was a de- 
cided step in advance and it did permit of shooting 
from the shoulder, and from this quite naturally fol- 
lowed shooting on the wing. 

Up to this time the setter had been the only dog 
used with partridges, but not to shoot over. He was 
still the setting spaniel used to "set" the covey, and 
over the birds a net was drawn. This sounds rather 
like pot hunting to us, but there were ethics of sport 
in those days, and the right thing to do was to make 
a selection of such as were in the best condition 
for the table and let the rest go. This setter was 
not quite what was wanted for the gun, but there 
had been in use for many years tracking hounds, 
which had developed the pointing instinct and stood 
the game, not birds, but animals of the chase. By 
years of parental education these dogs came natur- 
ally by this, showing by their standing and pointing. 
Perhaps it will be better to give a quotation from a 
print engraved for Blame's book, published in 1640. 
He is speaking of the tracking hound, whose duty 
was to go on a lead in the early morning, pick up 
the slot of the deer or other animal, and trace it to 
where the deer had "harbored" for the day. The 
man with the hound then returned to the head hunts- 
man and reported where the deer was. The hounds 
were taken there in couples, and the deer was "un. 
harbored," driven out for the chase. The quotation 
referred to is as follows: "Some aie of that nature 
that when they have found the game they will stand 
still till the huntsman comes up, to whom in silence, 
by their face, tail and eye, they show the game." 
What is that but pointing. And that was originally 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6, 1912. 



written early in the seventeenth century, and possi- 
bly earlier. 

These tracking hounds were used all over Europe; 
in France they used basse hounds, which I am very 
sure were the real St. Hubert hound, not the legend- 
ary dog usually supposed to have been of that breed. 
Ridinger gives several illustrations of this deer 
tracking In Germany, and at the same time he illus- 
trates the pointers of Germany. I have some half 
dozen of these illustrations, showing several differ- 
ently named pointing dogs, and the question as to 
their work is set at rest by their being shown point- 
ing partridges and pheasants. These French and 
German dogs are much lighter, as shown on almost 
every illustration that I have seen, than the Span- 
ish pointer, as typically illustrated by Stubbs, or as 
usually described in books of that period. Wiiat we 
know about thorn is that they were slow and sluggish, 
but had good noses. Some described them as being 
peculiar from other dogs in having a split nose, but 
1 have come across that feature as being claimed 
specially for German dogs, and within the past week 
read in a good English work of a hundred years aga 
that the split nose was pecliar to the French variety 
of pointer. 

It will be seen from this that published informa- 
tion has not been in the least reliable. The fact is 
that there is hardly a single reiterated assertion re- 
garding pointers which has for the last century 
passed muster as a fact which is absolutely reliable. 
For instance, you will find in every dog book, with 
but few exceptions, the statement that flying shoot- 
ing was introduced into England by an impoverished 
baron, who had brought some Portuguese pointers 
there some little time before Sydenham Edward es 
published this statement originally in 1806. This 
has ever since been accepted as gospel truth by 
bookwriters. Even Rawdon Lee, in "Modern Dogs," 
repeated it within the past decade. To refute that 
it is only necessary to turn to the poems of Guy, 
who in 1711 wrote the poem "Rural Sports," and 
described faithfully the actions of the pointer in the 
field, as well as the sportsman shooting flying. He 
was describing an every day incident in the sport- 
ing field of that time, and one is at liberty to form 
his own estimate as to how long before that period 
there were pointers and wing shooting in England 
for a poet to recognize it as an every day affair. 

I did read some time ago in one of the old sport- 
ing magazines, 1796, if I remember correctly, that the 
flint lock was in operation in the fourteenth cen- 
tury, but that seems to be too far back. However, 
as soon as sportsmen had that contrivance put on 
their "arquebuses" shooting flying at once followed, 
and to accommodate the man who wanted to find 
where the gp.me was, this self-educated tracking dog 
was still further developed. In European countries 
he had several names, and in England alone he was 
named the Pointer. He was just as much an Eng- 
lish dog as any other dog in that country, and bore 
no more affintiy to the Spanish dog than did either 
the French, the German or the Italian dog used for 
the same purpose, each of these having a distinct 
name. 

The best evidence one can get in the way of back 
tracking in the way of breed history is in paintings. 
Poets and descriptive writers used phrases which 
may now be misinterpreted, but when you get a 
painting, such as the Dassano above referred to, or 
anything of a like nature, you get on canvas what 
the artist knew of what, he actually had before him. 
It is by this total absence of any pictures showing 
pug-faced black and tan spaniels we know that King 
Charles never had any of what we now call King 
Charles Spaniels. The spaniels he fancied were 
snippy-faced, small, leggy, liver or black and white 
spaniels, bearing not the slightest resemblance to 
what we see at dog shows as English toy spaniels. 

o 

AIREDALE TERRIER CLUB OF AMERICA SHOW. 



The specialty show of the Airedale Terrier Club of 
America, which was held last Saturday in the Murray 
Hill Lyceum, was well attended and despite the ab- 
sence of such celebrated dogs as Tintern Royalist, 
Prince of York, King Oorang and Soudan Swiveller, 
also a consignment of five which Francis G. Porter, 
of Chicago, was importing from England by the 
steamer Baltic, and which he had hoped to receive 
on Friday, but was detained by fog, was in every 
way high class. 

Chief interest attached to the appearance of the 
famous imported Colne Hockley Oorang, owned by 
.Joseph A. Laurin, of Montreal, Canada. Mr. Laurin 
received the dog only three weeks ago from Eng- 
land and came on with it himself to let New York 
breeders and fanciers see his acquisinon. Unfor- 
tunately, however, the dog, for which Mr. Laurin 
was declared to have paid not less than $2500 and 
which is known as the sire of all the winning young 
dogs in England, as also of four full fledged cham- 
pions, was brought into the ring in poor condition 
and rough of coat and was beaten on all hands. 

Appearing in the limit class he was defeated by 
Red Hackler, the property of Russell H. Johnson, 
Jr., of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, and in the open 
class had to give precedence to G. W. Batson's Sou- 
dan Stamboul and Mr. Johnson's Red Hackler. 

Soudan Stamboul was declared the winner in dogs, 
but later was defeated for the cahmpionship by 
William Prescott Wolcot' s bitch Champion Kenmare 
Sorceress, whose manners and expression carried 
her through the supreme test in spite of a ragged 
coat and somewhat soft condition. Soudan Stam- 
boul seemed to realize that his behavior was likely 
to prove detrimental to his chances of annexing the 
premier honors and sought to disturb his rival's 



mental equilibrium by a display of temper. Through 
all the snarling and snapping, however, Kenmare 
Sorceress comported herself with a quiet dignity. 

Puppies, especially bitches, formed a very promis- 
ing display. Larchmere Kennels, of Hamilton .Mass., 
produced the female blue ribbon winner, Larchmere 
Laurel, fine animal of seven months, that gives 
promise of a bright future in the ring. 

The Awards. 

Puppies (dogs) — Theodore Offerman's York, the 
Past Master, first; A. Albright .Ir.'s, Baughfell 
Comet, second; Thomas Cadwalader's Cleek, third; 
J. F. Stanton's Stanley King, reserve. 

Novice (dogs) — Theodore Offerman's YorK, tne 
Past Master, first; South Mountain Kennels' South 
Mountain Duke, second; J. F. Stanton's Stanley 
King, third; Larchmere Kennels' Larchmere Perform- 
er, reserve. 

American Bred Dogs (champions barred) — Russell 
H. Johnson, Jr.'s, Red Hackler, first; Theoaore Offer- 
man's York, the Past Master, second; South Moun- 
tain Kennels' South Mountain Duke, third; Larch- 
mere Kennels' Larchmere Performer, reserve. 

Limit Dogs — Russell H. Johnson, Jr.'s, Red Hack- 
ler, first; Joseph A. Laurins Colne Rockley Oorang, 
second; Thomas Offerman's York, the Past Master, 
third; South Mountain Kennels South Mountain 
Duke, reserve. 

Open (dogs) — G. W. Batson's Soudan Stamboul, 
first; Russell H. Johnson, Jr.'s, Red Hackler, second; 
Joseph A. Laurin's Colne Rockley Oorang, third; 
Theodore Offerman's York, the Past Master, reserve. 

Winners (dogs) — G. W. Batson's Soudan Stamboul, 
first; Russell H. Johnson, Jr.'s, Red Hackler, reserve. 

Junior Dogs — Over six months and not over eigh- 
teen months — J. F. Stanton's Stanley King, first; 
Silas Wodell's Eden Hill Authority, second; Harold 
Ober's Malvern Brushwood Boy, third; Leicester 
Kennels' Clonmel Beau, reserve. 

Puppies (bitches) — Larchmere Kennels' Larcn- 
mere Laurel, first; Theodore Offerman's York May- 
fly, second; Silas Wodell's Eden Hill Authoress, 
third; Mrs. W. H. Mulford's Hedgeley Flintstone, 
reserve. 

Novice (bitches) — Theodore Offerman's York May- 
fly, first; Larchmere Kennels' Peelsborough Clover, 
second; Mrs. W. H. Mulford's Hedgeley Flintstone, 
third; John McGough's Lady Bolton, reserve. 

American Bred Bitches (champions barred) — A. 
Albright, Jr.'s, Baughfell Sceptre, first; John Mc. 
Gough's Lady Mary, second; Theodore Offerman's 
York Mayfly, third; Larchmere Kennels' Peelsbor- 
ough Clover, reserve. 

Limit (bitches) — Francis G. Porter's Springbank 
Sceptre, first; G. W. Batson's Soudan Sapphire, sec- 
ond; John McGough's Lady Mary, third; Grasmire 
Kennels' Grasmere Dona, reserve. 

Open Bitches — William Prescott Wolcott's Cham- 
pion Kenmare Sorceress, first; Francis G. Porter's 
Springbank Sceptre, second; G. W. Batson's Soudan 
Sapphire, third; John McGough's Lady Mary, reserve. 

Winners (bitches) — William Prescott Wolcott's 
Champion; Malvern Sorceress, first; Francis G. Por- 
ter's Springback Sceptre, reserve. 

Junior Bitches — Over six months and not over 
eighteen months — Silas Wodell's Eden Hill Author- 
ess, first; Mrs. W. H. Mulford's Hedgeley Flintstone. 
second; Malvern Kennels' Malvern Golightly, third; 
Knob Hill Kennels' Knob Hill princess, reserve. 

Selling Class (bitches) — Larchmere Kennels' 
Larchmere Fern, first. 

Brace Class — G. W. Batson's brace, first. 

o 

FIELD TRIAL NOTES. 



After decisively defeating the setter Rena Celle, 
owned and handled by J. M. Girton, of South Leban- 
non, Ohio, in the second series of the Derby of the 
Southern Field Trial Club, which began with twenty 
starters, the pointer Blue Diamond was declared 
the winner. 

Blue Diamond is the property of W. L. Blanken- 
baker, of Louisville, Ky., and was handled by E. D. 
Garr, of La Grange, Ky. This is the third time this 
dog has been played in the last three starts, his work 
here in these trials being the best that he has ever 
done, thus winning the stake easily. 

Second in the race was the pointer Success, owned 
by U. R. Fishel, of Hope, and handled by Herbert 
Fishel, of Washington, Ind. Third place was divided 
between the setters, Summit Chick, owned by Gus- 
tave Pabst, Milwaukee, Wis., and handled by W. H. 
Elliott, Courtland, Miss., and Mocharley, owned and 
handled by J. M. Avent, of Hickory Valley, Tenn. 

The English setter Happy Day owned by U. M. 
Fleischmann, New York, and handled by C. H. Bab- 
cock, New Bedford, Mass., won the all age stake of 
the Georgia Field Trial Club, at Waynesboro, Geor. 
gia, which began Wednesday of last week, with six- 
teen starters. Second to him was the English setter 
Uncle Dave, owned by G. S. Parson, New York, and 
handled by Jake Bishop, Rutherford, Ala., and third 
was awarded to setter Miss Hettie owned by H. R. 
Edwards, Cleveland, Ohio, and handled by G. T. Do. 
zier, Hannon, Ala. 

The race between Happy Day and Uncle Dave was 
a good one, in which neither dog had it on the other, 
but the first heat of Happy Day was unquestionably 
the best of the race, and on the strength of the two 
heats he was entitled to the decision. These two 
dogs were run an hour before a decision was arrived 
at. The winners in this stake are well known on 
the circuit and have been placed on frequent occa- 
sions. The closing of this stake concluded the trials 
in this section. 



EARNING CAPACITY ESTABLISHES VALUE. 



The light harness horse that cannot trot or pace 
fast enough to win in its class, or, at least, cannot 
make a buyer believe it can win, is a hard horse 
to sell at the price usually placed upon the animal 
by the owner. It is the earning capacity that 
establishes the value of the trotting-bred horse, just 
as it fixes the price of the drafter, and the trotter 
or pacer without an earning capacity is worth less 
upon the markets of the world today than an ordi- 
nary farm animal. This is a truth that should be 
brought heme to every breeder and dealer in this 
class of horses. The available speed of the trotter 
or pacer is what sells him and there is no getting 
away from that fact. The trotting-bred horse 
without speed is actually worth less on the market 
than western-bred range horses. This fact was 
plainly demonstrated less than two months since, 
when something like two carloads of trotting-bred 
horses sold at a Western sale for less than $100 per 
head, while, at the same place, and on the same 
day, a carload of Western range horses sold for $100 
per head, or, as they say at the stock yards, "$100 
a round." And why? The range horse could be 
worn out to advantage under the saddle, while the 
trr.tting-bred horses referred to possessed not one 
single desirable quality. 

It is true, nevertheless, that a market exists for 
very many trotting-bred horses, providing breeders, 
or owners fit the animals for that trade. Reference 
is had to combination harness and saddle horses, 
and during the early season of 1911 the demand 
for that class of horse was far greater than the 
supply. The trotter having good looks, substance, 
style, soundness and quality, can easily be shaped 
into a high-class combination horse. In fact, he is 
the ideal horse for that class or type. Over in 
central Missouri a number of trotting-bred horses 
are prepared each winter for this very demand, and 
the prices obtained always bring profits to the 
dealer. Occasknally a farm has done this sort of 
work, one in mind at present having for a number 
of years turned its trotters that could not trot fast 
enough to race into saddle horses, or combination 
horses, and at a good profit. One great trouble 
with too many Western breeders of trotters is that 
they expect, the "other fellow" to do all the fitting 
for market, hence the lack of profit in breeding, 
growing and marketing the product of the farm. 

This thing of the "earning capacity of the horse," 
as regards the price placed upon it by the buying 
public, has never been more forcibly illustrated than 
in the instance of recent sales of thoroughbred 
horses in Kentucky, where stallions, bred in the 
very height of fashion so far as running-bred blood 
lines go, sold at ridiculously lew prices, even as 
low as $50 per head for mature animals. In fact, 
a son of St. Simon brought only $51, and in at least 
one instance, a great brood mare went at the same 
price. Thoroughbred racing has been legislated 
from the map, and the earning capacity of the thor- 
cughbred horse is best given as "thirty cents," 
when the opportunity of betting on his performances 
is done away with. — Horse Review. 

o 

SOME HORSEY TERMS. 

A white spot in the forehead is a star. A white 
place from eye to eye is a bald face. A strip between 
the nostrils is a snip. A white eye is a glass eye. 
A horse has pasterns, not ankles, and there is no 
.such joint as a hind knee or fore shoulder. White 
around the top of the hoof is a white coronet. White 
below the pastern joint is a white pastern or above 
the pastern it is a white leg. A snip cannot be any- 
where but on the nose. Amble is a gait like pacing, 
but slower, in which the two legs on the same side 
are moved together. The croup is that part of the 
horse back of the saddle. The forearm is that part 
of the leg between the elbow and the knee, and the 
elbow is the joint of the foreleg next above the knee 
and not to the side. When the horse forges, it 
strikes the toe of the fore foot with the toe of the 
hind one, and this is sometimes the result of bad 
shoeing. Everyone should know that the hand, a 
term commonly used in describing the height of a 
horse — is one-third of a foot, or four inches. 

o 

While Missouri has recently lost by death Gratt 
2:02%. the fastest horse yet bred in the state and 
Harold, Jr., she gains two of the best that California 
'•ould send. Harry E. Wood of Norhurn brings in 
Lynwood W., sire of Sonoma Girl 2:04*4, and Henry 
G. Tangier of Carthage, Mo., has bought R. Ambush 
2:09%, by Zolock 2:05%, son of McKinney. This 
is a nine-year-old horse and the third 2:10 trotter to 
make a season in Jasper county. The first was 
Early Reaper 2:09-%, owned by E. Krull. The sec- 
ond was the Thomas W. Lawson horse Dare Devil 
2:09%. R. Ambush is sired by the fastest son of 
McKinney, whose dam was by Gossiper, giving us 
there the blood of Pilot Jr. through his fastest son, 
and that is not all, this horse's dam is by Silkwood, 
out of a daughter of McKinney. He was first 
started as a five-year-old and won all his starts. 
In 1908 he was started eleven times and scored his 
present reorrd, trotting several times in 2:10 or 
better. Henry G. Tangier, his present owner, has 
witnin the year completed a farm training track that 
has cost bin; about $1500. He has a well selected 
lot of brood mares, among them Miss Kankakee, 
2: 1 '% — L. E. Clement. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



ATTENTION TO DETAILS. 



When a breeder states that it is too much trouble 
to nominate his colts in the futurities and keep track 
of the payments, and for that reason he nominates 
but a portion of his colts, it looks as though the 
breeder was conducting his operations on too large a 
scale or else he lacks in system and sufficient help. 
Perhaps it would be better for him to curtail his 
operations, sell the mares of doubtful breeding quali- 
ties or those lacking in breeding, and devote all his 
energies to looking after the remainder as they 
should be, says the Western Horseman. 

There is work and lots of work on a stock farm. 
Of course there is. But if the work is attended to as 
it should be the reward is great. When mares noted 
for producing early speed are mated with the right 
stallions the sale of the colts is the reward, and that 
is greater or less according to circumstances. One 
of the latter is whether the colts are eligible to the 
futurities. The breeder loses a great portion of his 
reward if the colts are not entered, for purchasers of 
speed do not care to bother with youngsters unless 
there is a chance to race them in the big stakes. 

Unless there is such an opportunity the owner of a 
campaigning stable will spend his money for aged 
horses, ones he will not have to wait on for several 
years in order to get to the races. The present day 
buyer wants quick action. It is because of this that 
there are now fewer breeding farms in New England 
than formerly. The rich men in that section who 
race horses are too impatient to breed race horses. 
They want them ready made. 

Breeders in the West and Middle West find the 
Eastern market an extremely profitable one for that 
very reason. If they can find the golden "nick" to 
produce speed they find a great reward in the above 
mentioned market. These purchasers will buy colts 
if they can race them just as quickly as they will 
aged race horses. In fact it has become rather a fad 
to purchase a well-engaged colt, but it has got to be 
eligible to all the leading futurities. 

To be too busy to enter colts in the stakes means 
the loss of great prospective profits if the breeder is 
accomplishing what he set out to do — produce high- 
class, early extreme speed colts. Even breeders on 
the Pacific coast can well afford to patronize the 
futurities, as has been proven the past season. One 
colt on the Pacific coast sold for $10,000 because it 
was eligible to the big stakes. Another equally as 
well bred and that trotted faster in its work late in 
the fall sold for a fraction of that sum because the 
purchaser would have to wait until next year or the 
year after before being able to race. 

The difference in the prices of the two colts would 
pay the expense of entering all the colts bred on the 
Pacific coast in the leading futurities. Surely 
breeders who wish to make the greatest financial 
success possible will not find it too much trouble to 
enter their colts. It means work, perhaps "bother," 
but no success in any line of endeavor is attained 
without a great deal of very hard work. Not only 
work, but infinite patience in looking after every 
little detail. It's an old saying and a true one that 
"the big things look after themselves; it's the mul- 
titude of details that need attention." This is espe- 
cially true on the stock farm. The little things too 
often make the difference between success and 
failure. 

o 

That breeding is on the increase on the Pacific 
Coast is evident from the patronage extended the 
futurity recently closed by the Pacific Coast Trotting 
Horse Breeders' Association. This stake has 455 
entries, 39 more than was ever received for this 
event since its inception. This is good news, for the 
Pacific Coast has turned out many of our greatest 
trotters and pacers, and while there was a decrease 
in breeding after several of the large farms which 
had made California famous had passed out of ex- 
istence, owing to the death of their proprietors, yet 
the aggregate of small breeders is more than mak- 
ing up for the loss of these great nurseries of speed. 
The best blood in the Trotting Register is to be 
found on the Pacific Coast and there is no question 
but that among the large number of entries made 
for this latest futurity that a large number of high 
class colt trotters and pacers will appear that will 
add greatly to the fame of the coast as a breeding 
center. There is no question but that there is a 
greater interest in the breeding of the light harness 
horse all over the United States than there has ever 
been, and the prospects for the future are most 
brilliant. — Western Horseman. 



$2,500,000 will be the cost of the new arena that 
will succeed Madison Square Garden as the scene of 
future horse shows and sales to be held in New York 
City. The new building, which will be erected in 
Lexington avenue, between Forty-seventh and Forty- 
eighth streets, adjoining the new Grand Central sta- 
tion, will be completed, barring unlooked-for delays, 
by early fall of next year. At a recent meeting of 
numerous parties interested as prospective tenants 
of the new building, an organization to be Known as 
the Exposition Managers Association was formed, 
and it was announced that already contracts cover- 
ing 212 days a year for five years have been signed. 
E. J. Tranter, representing the Fasig-Tipton Com- 
pany, whose 11812 Old Glory sale is scheduled to take 
place in the new arena, was elected as a member of 
the executive committee. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



ANOTHER ARRIVAL. 



Mr. G. M. McPherson. of Montreal, Canada, has 
engaged ten stalls at the Pleasanton race track and 
sent for his string of trotters so he can winter 
them there, the majority belong to Messrs. McLeod 
& Wilkinson. Among them is the handsome bay 
stallion Belmar 40477, record 2:21%, sired by Moko 
(the great futurity stake sire), dam Chestnut Belle 
(dam of Mobel 2:10%, full brother to Belmar, Dart- 
more 2:11%, Chestnut King 2:12, Chesko (3) 2:19%, 
Slipaway 2:17%, Lady McGregor 2:24, Belmo 2:27, 
Yellow Belle, dam of Native Belle 2:06%, and Na- 
tive Beauty 2:27, and the sire Vanko 2:19%) by Red 
Wilkes 1749; second dam Mary, by Gov. Sprague 
2:20%; third dam Maud, by Gilroy, son of Lexington; 
fourth dam Belle, by Mambrino Chief II. Mr. Mc- 
Pherson believes he will be a whirlwind pacer and 
will convert him to that gait. When it comes to 
bloodlines this stallion is a "top nother" that has 
been "buried" in Nova Scotia for years. He also has 
Rose Lecco by Lecco 2:09%; Blaze Wilkes by Zom- 
bro 2:11; a handsome yearling by Belmar 2:21%, out 
of Dell Bars 2:11%, by Monbars 2:11%; Carlrea by 
Carlokin, out of Lady Rea 2:25; a three-year-old by 
Kinney Lou 2:07%; a three-year-old by C. The Limit 
2:04%; and three colts by Oro Wilkes Jr. 2:12%, he 
by Oro Wilkes 2:11, out of Abby Delmarch by Del- 
march 9787; second dam Abby 2:26 (dam of Abbie 
X. 2:23y 2 , Wilkesview 2:28y 2 , etc.), by Geo. Wilkes 
2:22; third dam Mattie Wilder (dam of 1) by Ameri- 
can Clay 34; fourth dam by Smith's Sir William. 
Mr. McPherson has trained at Jewettville track and 
at Kalamazoo and Terre Haute for three winters, 
and this is his first visit to this coast. He was most 
cordially welcomed by all the horsemen on the his- 
toric course at Pleasanton, and was delighted to find 
Messrs. Havis James, G. Spencer and Chas de Ryder, 
three old friends, there. 

LORD DENMARK, THE CHAMPION SADDLE 
STALLION. 

We herewith present a picture of Lord Denmark, 
the gaited saddle stallion that made such a sensa- 
tional record in Kentucky as a three-year-old during 
the season of 1909. Shown in the saddle ring four- 
teen times, he won thirteen first premiums and one 
second, including first at both the Kentucky State 
Fair, at Louisville, and the Bluegrass Fair at Lexing- 
ton. Shown in the harness ring five times, he won 
one first, three seconds and one third, the latter 
being at the State Fair. 

Immediately after he won the blue in the three- 
year-old gaited stallion class at the State Fair, he 
was purchased from Gay Bros., of Pisgah, Ky., by 
Mr. R. H. Whitten, of Los Angeles, Cal., who has since 
owned him. In the invigorating California climate 
Lord Denmark has developed into one of the hand- 
somest horses in the country, as will be seen from 
his portrait, which is a perfect likeness of him. 

r t is not to be wondered at, though, that sty'e, 
action and finish are so admirably combined in Lord 
Denmark, for he is by the great sire of show horses, 
Highland Denmark, and out of the show mare Lady 
Glascoe, by Glascoe, he by Forrest Denmark; con- 
sequently, his greatness is his by right of royal 
breeding. 

Lord Denmark promises to win even greater fame 
as a sire than he has as a show horse, for all of his 
colts inherit his conformation, style, action, dispo- 
sition, and perfection of manners. They have been 
shown freely on the coast and have won blue 
ribbons everywhere, the colts of no other saddle stal- 
lion ever having won over them. 

Mr. Whitten is an enthusiastic devotee of the sad- 
dle horse game, and it is largely through his efforts 
that California is coming to the front as the home of 
high-class saddle horses. 

— o 

MAN'S BEST FRIEND. 

Of all the brute friends of man, the horse is 
certainly by far the most useful and the most valua- 
ble to him. In these latter days he earns 'the 
living for his master, his master's family and him- 
self; usually works six days a week and hauls the 
family around on the seventh, accepts the poorest 
shelter or none at all, takes what food his master 
allows him uncomplainingly, is always ready to do 
his best at any task to which he is assigned and 
through thick and thin, bad luck or good, weal or 
woe, is the reliable, faithful, efficient and optimistic 
friend of his master, his family and his interests. 

In peace the horse toils for man in many ways; in 
war he suffers and dies for him. In disaster he 
carries his master out of danger; in victory he bears 
him proudly in the triumphal march. He shares his 
sorrows and his poverty in full and gets but little 
share in his prosperity. Though he would enjoy 
rest and recuperation in the green fields, he content- 
edly toils and struggles at his task on the bare roads 
between them. Blows he receives patiently from 
the hands of his taskmaster, nor resents them ex- 
cept when long continued, and sometimes not even 
then. Worn and weary, he drags out his day in 
and out, whether he is mortally ill or weakened from 
loss of rest or lack of food. He coins his life- 
blood for his master, every heart beat is for his mas- 
ter's welfare, and he is truer to man than man is tn 
himself. In war, in peace, in sorrow, in joy, in 
wealth, in poverty, the horse, the nobility of the ani- 
mal race, Is the closest, most valuable, most noble, 
most intelligent friend of man. His name is benevo- 
lence. 



CAPTURING ARIZONA 'A'lLD HORES. 



An attempt to clear the ranges of the Prescott 
National Forest of wild horses is being made by 
the stockmen of Williamson and Skull valleys, and 
the first rodeo resulted in the capture of about thirty 
animals on the Tonto divide, rays the Arizona Re- 
publican. 

Forest Ranger Mercer had a conference with 
George A. Carter, Clarence Stewart, J. V. Dickson, J. 
M. Cook, H. N. Cook and E. Contreras, representa- 
tives of the Burnt Ranch Company, and others, and 
a rodeo was arranged, with J. V. Dickson as captain. 
During that week a stockade corral was built at the 
old chimney in Tochey canyon and wire fences were 
strung along the canyon to inclose the water holes, 
leaving a narrow entrance at ^he south end. 

"Mormon wings" of cheesecloth were stetched 
upon the brush for more than a mile from .the en- 
trance of the fenced lot along the hillsides to the 
open country at Tonto divide. A rodeo camp was 
established at Carter's corral cn the old Toohey 
place and at the beginning of the following week a 
dozen men began the work of gathering broomtails 
and outlaws. 

Lookouts were posted upon high points near the 
soutu end of the canyon, while the larger number of 
riders went in search of wild horses in the open 
country west of Granite mountain. When a band 
was found the riders gave chase and tried to drive 
the horses into the canyon. Sometimes they got a 
band headed toward the canyon and sometimes the 
mustang? had notions of their own and went else- 
where. 

When the broomtails took to the hills there was 
wild riding through scrub oak i nd over rock-strewn 
slope.- and ridges, and the lookouts plunged down 
from their stations and tried to head off the band:, 
or picked out single horses and roped them anions 
the rocks Before the "Mormon wings" were 
stretched it was difficult to keep a band going down 
the canyon. The wild horses seemed to suspect, 
a trap and broke from the hills regardless of the 
rider;; who tried to turn them. 

The chesecloth, however, proved an effective bar- 
rier in most instances, although one small band went 
through it when alarmed by the presence of men 
near the corral. A band of thirteen mares and colts 
was; kept in the straight and narrow way by the 
streaks of white rag fluttering in the brush and ran 
directly into the corral. 

THE SUPPRESSION OF TIME. 



The suppression of the time at different race 
meetings throughout the land, is not, too frequently 
noticed. That it should be stopped no honest man 
will deny. What is more disgusting to a breeder 
of the trotting horse, than to take a seat in the 
grand stand directly opposite to the wire, take out 
his stop watch and carefully time the different heats 
of the trotting and pacing races, and hear the time 
announced from two to three seconds slower than it 
should be given. This discrimination in favor of 
some particular horse who is owned or managed by 
some one that happens to have more than ordinary 
influence with the timers, brings this state of affairs 
about, and when the timers are approached upon 
the irregularity they invariably give as an excuse 
that it was, seems hard to put the horse in question 
out of a certain class when a second or two would 
leave him where he was formerly, also another 
excuse they offer is that they were in the judges' 
stand right over the wire and that you were five 
feet to one side of the same, they forgetting that a 
horse trotting a forty gait moves thirty-three feet 
per second, and when going faster a greater distance 
is covered per second, and the mere fact of the out- 
side timer not being in the stand with the rest of 
the timers simply amounts to nothing as long as he 
starts and stops his watch when the first horse's 
head is even in line with the center of the judges' 
stand. To hang the time back in the manner men- 
tioned above is just as much of a crime as it is to 
ring a horse, you simply assist in robbing some one 
sooner or later. There should be almost as great 
a penalty upon any person for doing this irregular 
timing, who is found guilty of the same as the 
penalty imposed upon the man who is found guilty 
of ringing a horse, one crime in a way, is just as 
great as the other, and tends to make the trotting 
meeting more and more unpopular, with the honest 
horseman, and race-going patronage. Let something 
be done by the law makers that will tend toward the 
stopping of this practice, for the breeding interest 
demands it in the strongest kind of terms. 

o 

ARMY MOUNTS VERY SCARCE. 



In their zeal to suppress racetrack gambling, the 
legislatures of the various states have seriously 
threatened the supply of proper mounts for the army, 
according to Major General Wood, chief of stall, 
who has called the attention of congress to the 
subject. 

General Wood says that thoroughbred studs are 
being shipped out of the country in such numbers 
as to assume the magnitude of a calamity. 

While other countries are spending immense sums 
of money in importing stock, many of America's 
most renowned breeders have sold out entirely, 
shipped abroad, or are gradually reducing their estab- 
lishments. 

o 

Drink Ja:kson's Napa Soda. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6, 1912. 



1 THE FARM 

00«Cr«CeC«^^ 

TREATMENT OF YOUNG CALVES. 



Every new-born calf needs early 
cleansing by the licking of its dam. 

If the cow neglects this, it may be 
induced by sprinkling a little salt on 
the calf's Ijack. If after the navel 
string is severed — which the cow does 
with her teeth — it should bleed, it 
must be tied with a strong cord. 

If there be inflammation at the 
navel, a soothing ointment should be 
used; if a tumor should appear, it 
should be lanced and poulticed. The 
mother's milk is the best nourish- 
ment for the young calf. It alsd| 
furnishes needed correction and reg- 
ulation for the bowels and other or- 
gans. Diarrhoeal affections destroy 
many young calves. Unsuitable food 
may induce it, or overheating of the 
dam. Two ounces of castor oil con- 
taining one teaspoonful of powdered 
ginger is a valuable correction. It 
should be followed by gentian root 
tea mixed with two ounces of lime 
water, a pint being given three or four 
times daily. When this treatment 
and attention to the diet of the mother 
and calf fail, resort may be had to 
strong teas of oak bark or willow bark, 
with ginger added in either case. 
There is a form of colic called 
"shoote," which is very common 
among young calves, often affecting 
many in the herd. The first step in 
the treatment of this is complete iso- 
lation. 

This disease shows itself in loss of 
appetite, listlessness, griping, fre- 
quent water discharges from the bow- 
els, exhaustion and death. The 
prompt administration of a mixture 
of flour, eggs and linseed oil is desir- 
able. One dracm of essence of ginger 
and two drachms of laudanum, mixed 
in gruel, may be given at intervals un- 
til relieved. Young calves, if ex- 
posed to dampness, fogs, etc., are lia- 
ble to croup, or inflammation of the 
upper part of the throat and the for- 
mation of a whitish substance, or false 
membrane on these parts. 

This disorder is shown by a hoarse 
cough, a running at the nose and in 
breathing by a whistling or croaking 
noise. All of these symptoms increase 
as the disease progresses. Mild purges 
must be used at once: small quanti- 
ties of saltpetre should be given in 
drinking water, and the vapor of 
slackening lime may be inhaled to re- 
lieve the throat of the false mem- 
brane. 

Young calves are also troubled with 
lung worms, which are white, thread- 
like, parasitic worms, which are often 
found in the windpipe, the bronchial 
tubes and lungs of calves. Low, 
marshy pasture lands, especially in 
August and September, are conducive 
to this disease. The accumulation 
of these parasites is sometimes so 
great as to choke the afflicted animal 
to death. A hoarse, husky, bronchial 
cough, loss of flesh and difficulty in 
breathing are the more evident symp- 
toms. 

Sometimes the worms may be seen 
in the saliva or mucous which is 
coughed up, but where the disease is 
suspected careful examination of them 
should be made. Separate the afflicted 
animals from the herd; place them in 
a warm, dry stable; burn sulphur so 
they shall inhale its fumes, which are 
destructive to the parasites. A half 
ounce of turpentine should be given 
dally in gruel. Half a pint of lime 
water with a teaspoonful of turpentine 
given once a day is very effective. Re- 
lief from this disease should be fol- 
lowed with a tonic treatment, giving 
twice each day a tablespoonful of the 
following mixture: One-half ounce of 
turpentine, two drachms carbonate of 
lime, four ounces solution of gum 
arabic. 

o 

LEGISLATION WANTED. 



That something in the way of legis- 
lation giving the State power to eradi- 
cate tuberculosis from the cattle herds 
— both dairy and beef stock— and also 
from the swine, is of the greatest im- 
portance to California, is the declara- 
tion of State Veterinarian Keene. Tn 
order to bring this important matter 
to the attention of the Legislature at 



its next regular session, the California 
Livestock Sanitary Association has 
adopted resolutions asking the Gov- 
ernor to name a Commission to make 
a thorough investigation of conditions 
in this State with respect to the dis- 
ease among cattle and report to the 
Governor and the next Legislature. 

"There are 600,000 dairy cattle in 
California," said Dr. Keene, recently, 
"and in a majority of the herds there 
are tuberculosis cattle. This condition 
is dangerous in the extreme because 
of the fact that dairy products con- 
taining tuberculosis germs are con- 
sumed by the people. Beef cattle have 
it and swine, especially those known 
as 'dairy fed,' have it also, to a great 
degree. 

"Reports coming into my office from 
Government Inspectors show that at 
the large abattoirs a large percentage 
of hogs slaughtered for food have tu- 
berculosis. Some of the carcasses are 
condemned, while others are used aft- 
er the affected parts have been re- 
moved. 

'"The fight against tuberculosis in 
the herds of dairy and other cattle has 
been waged thus far in this State un- 
der an agreement between the State 
Veterinarian and the owners. This 
agreement is to the effect that all cat- 
tle which show marked symptoms of 
tuberculosis shall be slaughtered and 
the carcasses disposed of so as not to 
spread infection. 

"In California the laws are inade- 
quate to cope with the disease. We 
have no power now to go into a herd 
of dairy or other cattle and condemn 
and slaughter the ones having tuber- 
culosis. We have not the machinery 
for cleaning out tuberculosis from the 
swine herds. This is getting to be a 
serious subject because the disease is 
so generally distributed throughout 
the State." 

The California Livestock Sanitary 
Association asks Governor Johnson to 
name a Commission for the investiga- 
tion and to make recommendations 
consisting of two veterinarians who 
have had five years' experience, one 
dairyman, one stockman, one physi- 
cian, one hog raiser and a citizen 
who has not been in the cattle or hog 
raising business or has any profes- 
sional knowledge of the subject. — -Sac- 
ramento Bee. 



DIYIDKM) NOTICE. 



Till: ('.HUMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
Si K 'l ] :tv. 
(The Qtrman Bank.) 
• Member of the Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco.) 
526 California Street. 
Mission Branch, 2572 Mission Street, 
near 22d. 

Hielimond District Blanch. 601 Clement 
Street, corner 7th Avenue. 
For the half year ending December 
31. 1911. a dividend lias been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2. 
1912. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn 
dividends from January 1, 1912. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager. 



The Largest Place of Its Kind West of Chicago! 



G. Lindauer 

Proprietor. 

UNION LIVERY and SALE STABLES 

Work Horses to Let. 
Country Horses for Sale. 

Horses and mules bought and sold 

122-124 Clara St.. bet. Fourth and Fifth, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phone Kearny 059. Home J 2643. 

Special attention paid to the. purchase and 
shipment of horses and mules to foreign and 
domestic ports. 



riiRE that 

spaVIN 




Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds Greatest and Surest 

i$ Veterinary Remedy $m 

HAS IMITATORS BUT NO COMPETITORS! 



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Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
ing. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

"WIND PUFFS, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

S1CIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE, 

PINK EYE, 

SHEENY, 

BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS, 
SCRATCHES, 
PCLL EVIL, 
PARASITES. 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
ELEMISHES, 
SPLINTS. 
CAPPED HOCK, 
STRAINED TENDONS. 

SAFE FOR ANYONE TO USE. 



We guarantee that one tahlespoonfnl of Caustic 
Balsam will produce more actual results than a whole 
bottle of any 1 1 : . u ien r i :■ e 1 ■ ■ i n mixture ever made 
Every bottle cold Is warranted to give satisfaction 
Write for testimonials showing what the mo it promt 
nent horsemen say of It. l*rioe, S1.50 per bottle. 
Sold I r druggists, or sent by express, charges paid, 
wiih t aB directions for its use. 

The Accented Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Reliable. 

Sure In Results. 




■Importers &Prcrjrirtors for trie I „, .., 
^U.S.& CANADAS, /HI FVFI AN 



NOTHING TU'T GOOD TTF'Sfl.T'-' 

lave used GOMBAt'LT'S CAfsTIO BAl.s\M for mora 

than ;0 yevrs. It il tho best Mister I h»ve ever trie.l I ha 
use l it in hundreds of case, with be.t : 
feetly safe for the most inf- 
inite 11 
thev 



nits. It,,| 
.need person to use. Tin. 
'st breeding establishment of trotting horses in 
■ „ , »nd lis. your Mister often -W. H. KAVHUND, 

|lrop. II, union l ark Hloek Farm, Belmont F.,«, Hunt 



tJ^KD 10 TK AT?<5 srrc V.KiYVT.T.Y. 

IhnrauMd OOWBluLfS CAUSTIC BALSAM for tea I 

I- : ' lnv e been very successful in curing curb ringbone, I 
cupped hock and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism, and ad. I 
most every cause of lamenet* in horse. Have a.tableof I 
forty hend, in,,stly track and speedway horses, and Mr- I 
tainly can recommend it.-C. C. IKAvim Training I 
Stables. »»0 Jen o, logs Street, New York City. 



Sole Agents for the United States and Canada. 

The Lawrence-Williams Co. 

TORONTO, ONTw CLEVELAND, OHIO. 




DON'T FAIL TO GET SAVE-THE-H0RSE BOOK 



Lameness anil diseases causing lameness are not such dira: 
Our nt-w NA\ K-TIIB-HOB8E BOOK is an enry. 
clnpeili.-i of practical and cnmiili'lc refeieuem It is 
tho luti'st, most reliable and biehcBt authority. It is 
Hcientitic but not technical. Tnki-s in every scope 
and character of diseases causing lameness. 

M \ 1 1 I 1> WIT1IOIT CHARGE. 
Send for copy. 

rise case. We'll advise 
kly anil clearly what to do 
Send lor copy 
ol contract, Savr- 
Tbe-llorse Book, 
aid letters from 
B -eeders, business 
nr-n and bankers 
the world over un 
ri ery kind of ease. 
1U > cars' success . 

ROT • 10SI 111 
WITH THE H9R:e, 



EXPERT ADVICE FREE t 




and 



lilts 



I ab- 



solutely certain and 
p-rnianrut. Note 
how It is imitated, 
how our illustra- 
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nro cooied. 



IH unite 



sliiud Its 



Irons and serious matters since Save-The-Horse was dlscoceref. 

and why we give an ironclad contract to refund money. 
OFFICE OF .Mill \ C. M< 11(11. -. Mm or. 

Jasesvilix. Wis.. Sept. 26. 1911. 
Troy Chemical Co . Bincliainlon. N. Y. : Send on. hottla 
Sav.-Tho-Horso [ used it on mal e that threw two bog spavins 
and it did the work K. Same mare got a bad wire cut OB 
ankle, leaving a thick calloused enlargement. Two-thirds of 
a bottle reduced It over half, one more bottle will reduce th. 
rest. Send by return express. JOHN C NICHOLS. 

Head What a Until i r and Ruslnean Man Old With 
„ Suve-The-llorse. 

" Cleveland. 0— Lastfallat Lexington. Kv . I houghtthe Boost 
saddle and rarnago li-ose it waseur my pleasure to own. Dur- 
ing the winter he threw out ashrge a thoroughpin as lever 
saw. You can imagine my disappointment in having such a fine 
animal disfigured. I heard of you and bought one bottle, with 
result that lump on both sides of hock is entirely gone and has 
been a matter of lOmment on the part of every one who has 
seen it. The hock is to-day absolutely clean. I shall he glad to 
■how horse to the most expert veterinary There is no trace of 
ll.o trouble. W P. MUitBAY. 

Proprietor Murray Stock Farm, West Mentor. Ohio. 
_-£a past .i boltlo, w! Il a Contract to absolutely and pcrmft- 
?f"i.^ neatljeora Coco and Bon Spsvie, Thorotintipia, Rmqbsn. 
*+"-*•(. .... ,,i |,,w), Ciot. Spi.et. Capped Hock. WindpoH. 
S so Boil. Injured Tend -n> Bed all Ian-mess or RTFUN0 THE M0HET. 
No scac or loss id ha r II rse SRirkl as usual 

d Csnsda. 

ai.oe.N.6 



SS at all Drun-rts or Uc.il r-. or Express Paid u 8 
I I II, Hi ll I il. louimi.ei.il Ave., Bingo 



TROY CHEMICAL, CO., BINGHAM TON, If. Y. 
D. B. NEWELL, 

B6 Bnyo Vlsttn Avenue. Onklantl, Cal. 251 Keitr-y Street, San Frnnclsteo, Cal. 



ROSS McMAHON 

Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 



Phone Kearny 2030. 



403 Battery St, San Francisoo, Cal. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



A new crop which is reported to 
be a formidable rival of maize and kaf- 
fir corn has been found in Oklahoma. 
According to the superintendent of 
the State demonstration farms, this 
grain, which is called foetoria, pro- 
duces at least 20 per cent more than 
kaffir or maize. Foetoria is a new 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

train* 
for 
Business 
and place* 
its graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 

425 McAllister st. 

San Francisco. 



Buy the Best Horse 
Clipping Machine 
in the World at your 

Dealer's for Only $ 

O 




50 



With this won- 
derful Stewart 
Ball Bearing 
Enclosed Gear Machine, you 

can clip horses, mules and cows easier 
and quicker than in any other way. 
This machine has all gears cut from solid 
steel bar. They are all enclosed, pro- 
tected and run in oil There is six feet 
of new style high grade flex- 
ible shaft and the celebrated 
Stewart single 



1 



tensiounut 
clipping 
knife Get 
one from 

your dealer or write for our new 
191 1 12 Catalog Send a postal 
today Chicago Flexible Shaft Co 
204 Ontario St.. Chicago 




Get Your Stallion's Picture 



IN THE 



Breeders Special 
Number 

OF THE 

Breeder and Sportsman 

WILL BE PUBLISHED 

Saturday, March 2, 1912 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and he 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this Coast. 

IF YOU OWN A GOOD MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the 
best stallions on the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve aa a work of 



reference. 



AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers, and those who are interested in Field Sports, it will be 
particularly valuable. 



OWNERS OF STALLIONS 



who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. Write for price 
and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco. 




TALLION OWNER 

If ill need of anvthlne In the lino of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks 
Stallion Service Books, Horse Cuts In stock and mado from photos. 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, l'regnators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



sorghum indigenous in India, but 
greatly improved by scientific culture 
under the direction of the Oklahoma 
State Board of Agriculture, which has 
been experimenting with it for two 
years. Besides making excellent fod- 
der, foetoria is saia to make first-rate 
pancake flour. 



SPECIAL ADVERTISING. 



Wanted, For Sale, and Miscellaneous advertis- 
ing under this head will be set In nonpareil 
type (same type below) and will be published at 
the rate of 2 cents per word each insertion, or 6 
cents per word by the month. Count each abbre- 
viation and initial as a word. 



STUD ROOK FOR SAI.K. — Volumes 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Bruce's American Stud 
Book; handsomely bound; good as new. 
Will be sold cheap. Address Breeder 
•Mid Sportsman, San Francisco, Cnl. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE. — Bay mare 
by Chas. Derby, first dam Josie D. by 
Joe Daniel. About 10 years old; very 
handsome; a good driver; gentle; 
afraid of nothing; a good roadster. 
Address <'. H. JOKES, 7 IS 5th Ave, Sun 
Rafael, Oil. 



FOR SALE — The best roadster in tlie 
whole country; can be bought for 
$175; Just Mc 2:24'/ 2 ; five-year- 
old gelding; good size; all sound; 
don't wear straps nor boots; don't pull, 
and a lady can drive him anywhere. A 
snap. Address T. W. BARSTOVV, 1042 
Alameda Ave, San Jose, Cal. 



FOR SALE. — Trotting stallion sired 
by Chas. Derby, dam by Alcona. Color 
pure bay with black points. Weight 
1350 pounds. Height 16 hands. Stand- 
ard and registered. Will sell reason- 
able owing to death of owner. For 
full particulars, address J. B., Dox 112, 
Concord, Cal. 

FOR SALE, CHEAP — One registered 
stallion, sired by McKinney 2:14%; 8 
years old; sound. Also one imported 
draft registered stallion; weight 1800 
pounds; 7 years old. Would consider 
trade on heavy mare or standard-bred 
mares, or fillies. Breeding and pictures 
sent to Interested parties. Address D. 
A. BAKER, Hill P. O., San Diego, Cal. 

FOR SALE. — Standard bred black 
stallion; 15.3 hands; weighs 1100. Can 
trot in 2:15; nice mannered; easy to 
drive or control; good gaited; has 
trotted quarters in 31% seconds. Is 
only 5 years old. A grand stock, race 
or matinee horse; choicely bred; dead 
game, and handsome enough for a show 
ring. Address all communications to 
K. L., Breeder anil Sportsman Office 



FOR SALE — Halley Wilkes, black 
mare by Count Wilkes 2:21; dam by 
Orator, grandson of Electioneer. An 
ideal road mare, trots good road gait; 
paces when at speed, free legged; uses 
no boots. With one month's training 
paced quarter mile in 34V 2 seconds, 
half mile in 1:12 on half-mile track. 
Also three and four-year-old fillies out 
of the same mare by Dictatus 2:17. For 
price and particulars address W. S. 
CLARK, Gustine Stock Farm, Gustine, 
Cal. 



The Finest Winter Training Track in 
America. 

— THK— 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 

There are about 60 box stalls in first- 
class shape, newly roofed, and ready for 
occupancy. Horsemen who intend to 
campaign their horses next season should 
not delay too long if they want to pre- 
pare them on this track, which is uni- 
versally acknowledged to be the safest 
and best in existence. These stalls will 
not be vacant long. For further par- 
ticulars apply to 

H. E. ARMSTRONG, 

Proprietor. 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

J. S. Phippen 

Ts now located on the A. J. Clunie 
farm, adjacent to the celebrated Palo 
Alto Farm, at Maylleld, where he Is 
prepared to keep' a few horses through 
the winter. He has fine box stalls and 
paddOOks and can take the best of 
care of all sent him. He Is also pre- 
pared to break colts either for city 
use or racetrack. His lifelong expe- 
rience In this branch of the business 
has fitted him to do this work care- 
fully and well. He takes pleasure In 
referring to all for whom he has ever 
worked. Address .1. S. PHIPPBN, Mav- 

deld, Cal, 



Sunset Limited 



An entirely new luxuriously furnished, 
vacuin cleaned, steel car train 

From San Francisco (>:00 p. m . Tuesdays 
and Fiidays through Los Angeles and 
El Paso to New Orleans in 70 hours via 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Connecting at New Orleans witli " New 
Orleans-New York Limited" for Atlanta, 
Baltimore, Washington, and New York; 
Illinois Central, Seaboard Air Line, 
Louisville & Nashville and other lines 
for St. Louis, Cincinnati, Chicago and 
Atlantic Coast Cities, as well as New Or- 
leans-New York SS Line for New York 
direct. 

Dinner service unequaled by the finest 
hotels or restaurants. Parlor observa- 
tion car with library, ladies' parlor, buf- 
fet, latest magazines and newspapers. 

Stenographer, barber, valet, shower 
bath, ladies' maid, manicure. Cour- 
teous and attentive employees. Kxcess 
fare $10.00. 

Write or call on our nearest agent fur in- 
formation and reservations. 

TRIANGLE TRIP 

OVER THE 

Northwestern Pacific Railroad 

One of the most delightful scenic 
one-day jaunts in America. 

150 miles of Mountain and Redwood For- 
est Scenery, a Boat Ride on San 
Francisco Bay and by rail along 
the Russian River. 
Leave San Francisco 7:45 A. M. dally 
except Sunday, and 8:45 A. M. Sunday 
only, by boat across the Bay of San 
Francisco, in full view of the Golden 
Gate to Sausalito (the Sorrento of 
America). Thence via picturesque San 
Rafael and thriving Petaluma (home of 
the chicken industry), through Sonoma 
Valley to Santa Rosa and Fulton. From 
Fulton, through magnificent mountain 
scenery and redwood forests and along 
Russian River, to Monte Rio. Return 
is made along the coast, passing To- 
males Bay, Point Reyes, San Anselmo, 
etc., to Sausalito, arriving at San Fran- 
cisco 7:35 P. M. daily the same evening. 

If preferred, trip can be reversed, 
leaving San Francisco at 8:15 A. M. via 
the coast to Monte Rio and returning 
along the river and through the val- 
leys, arriving at San Francisco 7:35 
P. M. daily except Sunday and 7:05 
P. M. Sunday the same evening. 

Round Trip Fare for Triangle Trip. $2.80, 
except on Fridays or Saturdays, it Is $2 50 
and on Sundays only $2.20. 
Tickets on sale at 874 Market Street (Flood Bldg.) 
and Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office. 

PUBLIC TRAINING STABLE. 

DICK WILSON 

Of Pleasanton 

Announces he will train a few good 
"prospects" for outside owners this 
winter and prepare them for next sea- 
son's campaign at very reasonable 
rates. Mr. Wilson has given 15 horses 
race records of 2:10 or better. 61 with 
records of 2:15 or better, besides giv- 
ing the double team Hedgewood Boy 
and Lady Maud C. the world's record 
to pole of 2:02%, besides winning many 
races with them. Address DICK WIL- 
SON, Hnee Track, Pleaaanton, Cal. 



CHAS. WHITEHEAD'S 

Public Training Stable 

Pleasanton Race Track 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

Horses and colts trained at reason- 
able rates for next season's campaign. 
Best of care given. Developed and 
campaigned successfully the Futurity 
stake winners North Star 2:11%, Delia 
Derby 2:11 % and many others. Address 

CHAS. WHITEHEAD, Pleasanton, Cal. 



J. L. McCarthy 

LIVESTOCK 
AUCTIONEER. 

Fifteen years experience at 
Chicago. St. Louis And KansRs 
City stock yards. Thoroughly 
posted on pedigrees of stand, 
ard -bred horses. 
Country Salei a Specialty 
KEY ROUTE HOTEL. Oakland. Cal. 
Thone, Oakland Ml'-' I. 




Address 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



fSaturday, January G, 1912. 



TWO GREAT SIRES. 



The Bondsman 



Reg. No. 37641 



SJRK OF 



Colorado E. (3) 2:04$. ; 




don 8- 
• - old of 

the world. Winner of the Matron. American 
Horse Breeder and Kentucky Stock Kami Fu- 
turities; second in Kentucky Futurity. 

The Plunder ( 4) 2:07£, J^'eaS 

old stallion of 1910. 

Grace Bond (J) 2:0ti ESStt 

Kentucky Futurity. 

Creighton 2:081, r " cord ma,le 1,1 mi - 

and :il others. 

Half brother to Jay Hawker 2:U%. sire of Country Jay 2:0. r >Vi, Susie Jay 2:06'4, 
etc. 

Half brother to The Tramp, sire of Bervaldo 2:08'4, Trainpfast (2) 2:12V4. 
Half brother to Sorrento Todd H) 2:HV4, Belle Sentinel 2:15, etc. 



II \IU>\ WILKES 2il8. . 

Sire of 12 in 2:10, in- 
cluding Bumps 2:03'4, 
Rubenstein 2:05, Bar- 
on May 2:07 y t ; sired 
dams of 4 in 2:10. 



GEORGE WILKES 2:21 

Sire of S3, dams of 20 4 



BELLE P V I ( HEN 2:30% 

In great brood mare list. 



SORRENTO 

Ham of Jay Hawker 
2:14%, Sorrento Todd 
(4) 2:14»4. Belle Sen- 
tinel 2:15, Eola 2:19%, 
I,azv Bird 2:26%, Ted- 
dy Sentinel. 2:29%, The 
Tramp (sire), etc. 

4th dam Virgie — by Ahdallah 15. 

5th dam I^ucy — by Highlander (Veech's). 



<;it \\l> SENTINEL 

2tS»% 

Sire of 23, including Nel- 
lette 2 : 1 6 ',4 . Tosca 
2:18%. 



EMPRESS 

Dam of 2 and grandain 
of 9. 



i II 1 Mlil.KTOM \\ 10 

Sire of 40. 
1 DOLL1 SPANKER 
Dam of 1. 
M AMIIKINO PATCHBN 

68> 

Sire of 25. dams of 162. 
SAI.I.i CHORISTER 
By Mamb. Chorister, 
dam of 2 in 2:20, etc. 
SENTINEL 280 

Sire of 8 In list. 
>l Ml) OF LEXINGTON 

By Mamb. Pilot 29. 
• lll> U.I. Ml MAMBRINO 
Sire of 15, dams of 42. 
Ill); ELLEN 

Bv Clark Chief. 



THE BONDSMAN is the only stallion that sired three new 2:10 performers 
with race records in 1910. In spite of the fact that he has no record, The Bonds- 
man was a colt trotter of great merit. He was a contending colt all through the 
Kentucky Futurity of 1899. getting third money. This was a six-heat race and was 
won by Boralma. As a four-year-old he was not raced, but trotted a public trial 
In 2:11. As a sire he is destined to be tin leading son of the great Baron Wilkes, 
founder of the greatest futurity winning family. 

He will make the season of 1912 ut 



the Season w ith usual 
retwn privilege 1918. 
Season ends June 1st. 



Pleasanton Training Park. $100 
THE PATCHEN BOY 39033 

Three-Year-Old Record 2:10 :i , in a Winning Race. 

Sired by the Hr.^at WILKES BOY 3803, sire of 107 In standard time. 

A Genuine Race Horse and a Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 
The Patchen Boy 39033 is sire of the following: 

Francis J 

Evelyn Patchen. 
Scott Patchen . . 
Dessie Patchen 
Frank Patchen . 
Ruby Patchen . . 
J. C. Patchen . . . 

Dam Lady Clay, the dam of The Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%, C. W. M. 2:24% 
(trotted to high wheels), Anglin Wilkes 2:16% over half-mile track, trial 2:09%, 
by Metropolitan 1372. son of Hambletonian 10; second dam, Haggie Brown, by 
Ashland Clay; third dam, Pitty Pat, thoroughbred. The Patchen Boy was the 
greatest three-year-old race colt in the world, winning six straight races in the 
Grand Circuit the only year he was raced. His produce are good-headed and real 
race horses. (No tin cups.) 

THE PATCHEN BOY is a beautiful black. 16.1 hands and weighs 1290 pounds. 
His colts are of fine size, great individuals and the kind that sell for the high 
dollar. 

Season of 1912 at Pleasanton Training Park. Fee: $50 1913 

Both of the Above Horses Will Remain in California. 

Best of care and attention given mares, but no responsibility assumed for 
accidents. Good pasturage at reasonable rates. For further particulars and full 
tabulated pedigree, address 

WILLIAM J. wii.suN. Manager, iMeiixantou, Cel. 
A Choice Collection of Kentucky Saddle IlorMON for Sale. 



2:08 


Legal Patchen . . . 


1 


1 5 % 


Dorothy C 


2:19% 


2:10% 


Lucile Patchen . . 


a 


16 


Louise Patchen . . 


2:19% 


2:12% 


Jerry Patchen . . . 


■1 


16% 




2:19% 


2:13 


Knightstown BelleS 


16% 


Roscoe Binning . 


2:20 


2:13% 


Alec Williams . . . 


2 


18% 


Mary Patchen . . . 


2:20% 


2:13% 


Lois Patchen 


2 


19% 


Black Patchen . 


2:20% 


2:14% 


Auduous the Millei 


2 


19% 


and 11 others in 


2:30. 




WM. HAROLD 2:13 



•j By Sidney 2:19 , 

Dam 

4 Cricket 2:10 



Sire of Frank N". 2:07%. Janice 2:08%, The Iceman 2:10, etc. 

Season 1912. $5 at first service; $20 when mare proves 
with foal. 

Apply or address 

JA8. D. JOHNSTONE, 

Klmhurst. Alameda Co., Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

1 Typewritten, Suitable for Framing, i 

Registration ot Standard-Bred Horses Attended to. 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and terms on first page; complete tabulated 
pedigree on the two inside pages and description on hack page. 

Stallion Cards 

Two sides, size x (i^, to tit envelope. 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

Size, one-half sheet, 14 x 22; size, one-third sheet, 1 1 I 14. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1. 

Address, BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

366 l'acitic Bldg., San Francisco 



Life is too short and too strenuous 
to make new breeds or to dally with 
cows not of the dairy form and tem- 
perament. 



FOR SALE 

The Standard and Registered Trotting 
Stallion 

ROYAL DERBY 31239 

Sired by Clias. Derby 2:20: dam Clip- 
per Simmons by Mambrino Boy 2:26 Vb; 
second dam Susie Simmons by Sim- 
mons 2:28; third dam Susie by Broken 
I<eg 9667; fourth dam Fannie Grant by 
Bishop's Hambletonian. A magnificent 
representative of the Electloneer- 
Stratbmore - Wilkes and Mambrino 
Patchen blood. 

Royal Derby is a big, handsome, 
brown horse; stands 16 hands, and 
weighs 1350 pounds. He has plenty of 
style and action. Has never been 
trained for speed, but can show a 2:20 
gait on road trotting. He is one of the 
surest of foal getters and his progeny, 
although quite young, is pronounced by 
competent judges to be the finest, 
handsomest and best proportioned of 
any in Southern California. My rea- 
sons for selling are I have sold my 
ranch and Intend to devote my time to 
another calling. 1 will sell him very 
reasonably, if applied to at once. I 
know of no horse that will take better 
among farmers and horsebreakers. Be- 
sides his excellent bloodlines, lie has 
all the qualifications of a gerat sire. 
For further particulars, apply to 

O. A. HORN, Anaheim, Cal. 

Box 137, K. P. I). No. 8. 



FOR SALE OR LEASE 

The Standard-Bred Trotting Stallion 

UNIMAK 40936 

(Full brother to Sterling MrKinney 
2:06%.) 

Sired by McKinney 2:11%. dam 
Twenty-third by Director 2:17; second 
dam Nettie Nutwood (dam of Hills- 
dale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%; third 
dam by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903; fourth 
dam by Williamson's Belmont. 

I'nimak is a beautiful seal brown; 
stands 16.1 hands, and weighs 12">0. He 
is One of the finest-looking, best-bred 
and best-gaited trotters on this Coast. 
His disposition is perfect. For terms 
ind other inform;: tl:n apply to tfcls 
office. 



CHOICE ONES FOB SALE. The 

six-year-old black pacing mare Celia 
K. (trial 2 : 1 H , at the Stadium); no 
record; by Arner 2:17*4; dam by Direct 
2:05%; second dam Carrie S.. by Mam- 
brino Wilkes. This mare stands 15.2. 
weighs about 1050; free legged; wears 
six-ounce shoes all around. Is abso- 
lutely sound and guaranteed; not afraid 
of anything; perfectly gentle, and she 
will he a 2:05 pacer this year if she 
goes into capable hands. I will sell her 
with a proviso that she will pace in 
2:05. This is a beautiful mare, one of 
the handsomest and best prospects in 
California. I have also a full sister to 
her, a jet black four-year-old, which 
1 will also sell. She is a strong, rugge 1 
mare, and will undoubtedly be as fast 
as her sister. For further particulars, 
apply io H. OLSEN, ."nil Eaaf Four- 
teenth street, Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE, CHEAP— The best bred mare 
in California. Bay filly. :i years old; sound. 
With ("i weeks' work paced a mile in 2:20 to a 
cart and had just 2:00 speed. Sired by Nutwood 
Wilkes: 1st dam by Bonnie Direct 2:06%; 2nd 
dam by Searchlight 2:03?-j; 3rd darn by Director: 
4th dam Llda W . dam of Nutwood Wilkes by 
Nutwood (".00. Bred by Martin Carter. Nutwood 
Stock Farm. Address T. W. BAKSTOW, 1042 
Alameda Ave.. San Jose. Cal. 



SMITH'S WONDER WORKER 

Registered 




Trade Mark 

Endorsed by Horsemen the world over as the 
BEST remedy for Bowed. Strained and Kup- 
tured Tendons. Weak Joints. Cording Up, Buck 
Shins, Shoulder. Hip and Stifle Lameness and 
Rheumatism. As a Leg and Body Wash it has 
no equal. $2 per bottle prepaid, (18 per dozen. 
$10 per gallon F. 0. B. Tiffin. At all harness, 
makers and druggists. W. K. SMITH. Tiffin. 
Ohio. 

WM. E. DETEL8, 

Pacific Coast Agent. Pleasanton. Cal. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealers in PAPER 

37-1 st St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Blake, Moffit & Towne. Los Angeisa. 
Blake. McFall ot Co., Portland. Ors. 



MM 

HOTEL 

ENTIR-LLY RLBUILT 
JINCE THE FIRE 

Far famed and first 
named wherever good 
hotels are mentioned. 

Recognized as tlie headquarter or 
the businessmen of the world. 
The place where you always find 
your friends. 

European plan only. 

Msnagement 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the ben of profes- 
sional urvtcei to all caiei of veterinary 
dentiitxy. Complicated caiei treated iuc- 
ceufullr. Caili from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

Th* best work at reaaonaoie prloea 
IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

620 Oetavia St., between Fulton and Orove. 
Phone Market 2074. San Frsnsiaeo, Cal. 

WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

11 5 5 Golden Cats Av. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster ana Uneitnu 
Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

HOMEPHONE PRAISED. 

A new subscriber writes the Home 
Telephone Company under date of Oc- 
tober 28, 1911: 

"Please install a phone at my home. 
I did not know anything about the good 
points of the Homephone and was 
rather prejudiced against it until I be- 
gan using it in my office. I use it all 
the time now. not only In phoning 
around the building, but getting outside 
numbers, because it saves me time and 
trouble. The Homephone delivers the 
goods. 

"You know the burners of candles 
rioted in London about 500 years ago 
when gas was introduced. Most of us 
object to changes. Possibly that Is the 
reason why I am so late in ordering a 
Homephone." 

BAY CITIES 

HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 

33.i Grant Ave.. San Francisco. 
CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art in 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artlatio Designing 
121 Second St., San Franolseo 



REGISTERED FRENCH DRAFT 

STALLION FOR SALE 



Four years old. weight 1800, color black. Ad- 
dress 

J. B. ROOT ESTATE, 

Lafayette. Contra Costa Co.. Cal. 



iURBINE 



STOPS 
LAMENESS 



from a Bone Spavin, King Bone, 
Splint, Curb, Side Bone or similar 
trouble and gets horse going sound. Does 
not blister or remove the hair and 
horse can be worked. Page 17 In pamphlet 
with each bottle tells now. fe'.Ou a buttlo 
delivered. Horse Book » E free. 

ABSORBINK, JK., linlmont for man- 
kind. Removes Painful Swellings, Enlarged 
I Glands, Goitre, Wens, Braises. Varicose 
Veins, Varicosities, Old Sores. Allays Pain. 
W1U tell you more if you write. 11 and t! a bottle 
at dealers or delivered. Manufactured only by 
W.F.Y0UNG. P.O. F.. 54 Temple St., Sprlngfteld.Mau. 

For Rale by Langley 4 Michaels, San Francisco, Calif.: 
Woodward, Clark « Co., Portland, Ore., F. W Brian Go., 
Brunswig Drug Co., Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los An- 
geles. Calif.: Kirk. Cleary A Co.. Sacramento, Calif.: Pacific 
Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane Dru~ ;o., Spokane, Wash. 
Coffin. Redlngton Co. .San Francisco. Cal. 



Saturday, January 6, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



The Man Who has Gome Back. 

The host of admirers of what the veteran war horse of the shooting game — The 
Hon. T. Bill Crosby — has done lately with his H4-inch harrel Parker gun, will be 
glad to read the following, viz: 

In the Eastern Handicap 100 out of 100 targets. 

In the Western Handicap 492 out of 500 targets. 

In Evansville, Ind., Tournament 395 out of 400 targets. 



Making a continuous run of 987 out of 1000 targets 

The only straight score ever recorded in the Grand American Handicap 

event was made with a Parker gun, scoring 100 out of 100 at 19 yards rise. Further- 
more the same Old Reliable has won the National Championship of America 

every year it has been shot for. 

For information regarding small bore guns, address the pioneer makers of the 



20 gauge 

PARKER BROS., 



Meriden, Conn, 



N. Y. Salesrooms. 32 Warren Street. 

Resident Agent: A. W. du Bray, P. O. Box 102, San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
»«" OUTFITTERS, 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER*! 
ATHLETE. 



Company J ev ery ne 



48-52 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
AJL" APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



MITH GUNS 

HUNTER ONE — TRIGGER 

WEATHER conditions aren't always at 
their best in the "blind" or in the 
skiff. That's when you don t want 
your gun to balk or double. 
YOU CAN easily wear gloves if you 
shoot with a Hunter One-Trigger. 
And without "fiddling." It wont 
balk— because there is no friction to 
make it balk. And it won't double— 
because there is no second trigger to 
get tangled up in your glove. 
The very newest Hammerless Smith Gun 
is the 20-Gauge Hunter One-Trigger. 
Weighs only 5% to 7 lbs. Just the finest 
gun that can be made at the low price. 
Write for free Catalog to-day 
The Hunter Arms Co 
92 Hubbard St 
Fulton. 
N. Y. 




"IDEAL" 



All that the name implies 



The Perfect Marine Gas Engine 



SIMPLICITY 



RELIABILITY 



STRENGTH.... 




FOUR CYCLE 



4 TO 40 



HORSEPOWER 



SHOWING PORT SIDE — 16 h. p. 

EVERY ENGINE GUARANTEED. 

No freak features, but every part perfected along the most approved 

lines. 

SOME ADVANTAGES OF THE "IDEAL." 

All Parts Easily Accessible. 
Expansion Chamber Hetween Cylinders. 
Exhaust Manifold at Bottom of Cylindem. 
Mechanical Force Feed Lubrication. 
Compound Bronze and Babbitt Dovetailed Bearings. 
Perfect Ignition System and Perfect Timing. 
Absolute Control at All Speeds. 
Noise and Vibration Redueed to a Minimum. 
All -ittings Highest Grade for Salt Water. 

The Moit Power and the Leait Fust. 

Send for Catalogue and you will know more. 

IDEAL CAS ENGINE, Wollaston, Mass. 

PORT SIDE — 4h. p. California Agency : 3G6 Pacific Bldg. 8an Francisco, Cal. 




«*»««.»»3ttaa«XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXVXX3» 

! 



RESULT OF OVER A CENTURY'S EXPERIENCE. 







Perfection in powder-making is only achieved by exercising the most 
scrupulous care in the selection and preparation of raw materials, employing 
skilled workmen exclusively, and using only the most improved modern me- 
chanical equipment. 

This is the (Oj^PLTNT) method and accounts for the unequaled reputation 

T) brands of 



I Bulk> 



among sportsmen enjoyed by the (Q 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

Two of these brands that are in high favor among shooters are 



I Bulk) 





A. perfect shotgun powder with light recoil. Hard grain— Smokeless— uniform. Requires 
Unlike other powders of light reroil.Schultsse no special wadding to make it do its best, 
gives high velocity and remarkable pat- Loaded ju>( ;is easily as Black Powder, 
terns. " The Old Time Favorite." 

These powders positively will not pit the gun barrels. 
Unequaled for Field and Trap-Shooting. 
See that your shells are loaded with either SCHULTZE or E. C. Send to-day fur Schultze 
and E. C. pamphlet No. 99. It contains information of interest to all shooters. 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY / 
Established 1802. Pioneer Powder Makers of America. Wilmington, Del. J 

WWWWt XX^XXXXXXXXXXVVXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXJI 

GOLCHER BROS. 



Camping 
Goods. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 

510 Market St., San Francisco 



Fishing 
Tackle. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Of San Francisco 



CAPITAL 
$3,000,000.00. 
SURPLUS AND PROFITS 
$1,900,000.00. 




Rudolph Spreckels. Pres. 
James K. Lynch, Vice-Pres. 
J. K. Moffltt. Cashier. 



mm 




Offers adequate banking 
service to mercantile firms, 
business men, professional 
men and banks. 



Post and Montgomery 



J. H. Skinner. Assistant-Cashier 
C. H. McCormlck, " " 
(ieo. A. Kennedy. 



Three legged Horses' 

are not curiosities by any means. The country is full of them. Tl 1 
fourth leg is there all right but it is not worth anything because of a curb, 
splint, spavin or other like bunch. You can cure the horse of any of these 
aiimentt and put another sound Ice under him by the use of 




4L<r 



Qu inn's Ointment. 

It Ik time tried and rcllnblo. Win n a borne la cured 
wlthoulnn'sOlntmont ho stavli en red. Sir. K. K.Uurke 

• ■ I S| i • i ' M" . v> riteaaH follows: "1 have been 

iltdnir Qulnn'a Olntmont fo r —T en d vt'.r, anil have ef- 
fuetefl many nmrvelnufl eure*-, It will k'o deeper and* 
causeless pain thnn any bllitor I ever u»e<l. Thouifht 
It my duty for tho henefltof horpeato recommend your 
Ointment 1 am never without It " This Ih theirenernl 
vcnllct hv all who ul vp Qulnn'a Olnlmant a trial. Koi 
curbs, apllnta, ipavlnn. wlndpuuv. and all Imnohei It 
la n nen,un led. Price tl per bollla nt all dniKirlnts 
or n lit by mall. Send for circulars, teRtlinonlal»,&c 
W. B. Eddy « Co., Whitehall. N. Y. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January G, 1912. 



HORSE CLOTHING, HORSE MEDICINES 
BLANKETS ROBES 
AND WHIPS. 
Sole Agent for California Stallion Shield. 
Sao Francisco Agent for 

2:10 LINIMENT. 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



The only 
Manufacturer 
of 

Horse Boots 

on the 
Pacific Coast. 



1911 Grand American Handicap I 

THE GREATEST TRAP-SHOOTING HONOR OF THE YEAR WON WITH £ 

PETERS SHELLS 



AT COLUMBUS, OHIO, wUNE 22, 1911 



By a Record Score, 99 out of 100 From 20 Yards 

Mr. Harvey Dixon of Oronogo, Mo., handicapped on the 20-yard line, and shooting PETERS Factory Loaded Shells, purchased by him out of the regular stock of the 
Columbus ( iun Club, won the most coveted honor in the trap-shooting world, together with the Inter-State Association Trophy and the SI ,U00 purse. The score of 
99 from I'll yards in the Grand American has never been equaled. It pays to use PETERS Shells---the kind having "Steel where Steel belongs." 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 



Ncif lorki Its Chamben St., T. II. Keller, Mtrr. 
San FranrlMfo: 808-4U Howard St., J. S. French. Mgr. 
New Orleanai • Magazine St.. E. I'. I.eekert, Mgr. 




WINCHESTER 

Repeating Rifles the Hunter' s Choice. 

Winchester Repeating Rifles have been the favorite hunting rifles for decades, and 
with the introduction of new models from time to time to keep pace with dis- 
coveries and improvements in firearms and powders, they have remained first in 
the esteem of experienced hunters. There is a Winchester repeater for every kind 
of shooting; and whether you wish a little .22 Caliber or a big .405 or .50-110 for 
the largest game, you will find your requirements best met by a Winchester. 
Don't overlook the Winchester Self- Loading Rifles, which are made in cal- 
ibers from .22 to .401, suitable for all kinds of hunting. These rifles are 
simple and reliable in action and exceedingly rapid and accurate in shooting. 

Send for large illustrated catalogue. It's free. 
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., - - NEW HAVEN, CONN. 




There is a Distinct Advantage 



IN SHOOTING 



SELBY LOADS. 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO. 



San Francisco. 



BECAUSE — SELBY LOADS are loaded on the Pacific Coast and therefore are ABSOLUTELY FRESH. 
BECAUSE— It has been proven SHOOT after SHOOT that SELBY LOADS are ALWAYS RELIABLE. 
BECAUSE— The shooter can have SPECIAL LOADS AT A MOMENT'S NOTICE. 
BECAUSE— SELBY LOADS are backed by the SELBY GUARANTEE. 

Demand SELBY LOADS. 

ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTE! 



Get Your Stallion Ads in the Breeder and Sportsman! 



VOLUME LX. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1912. 



Subscription— $3.00 Per Yeai 



California State Exposition Park 

i — SCALE lOOfT-IIw _ Boat n Ot Park Cow 



Sixth District Agricultural. Association 

— -Govermi/ig Body- — 
Pres Wm A\ Bowr.w-Qr.o R A\urdock - Johm Pap kiaj z>oa< 

Fp.ed El- Pierce-John Reynolds- James 5lauso« 
/H W.Thowpscw - Ferry Weidncr. 




GROUND PLAN OF THE NEW EXPOSITION PARK AND PAIR GROUNDS, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 



f HIGH TEST 

OIL- 

HIGHEST GRADE 

PENNSYLVANIA OIL 

M»NUF4CTURE0 EXPRISSIV FOB 



IWHITTIERCOBURNCOI 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Penn. 150° Test. 49° Grav. 



Argo Coal Oil 

SAFEST FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Absolutely Sweet, Water White, Clean, Highest Test Oil. 

NO SMOKE-ODORLESS. 

MANUFACTURED EXPRESSLY FOR 

Whittier - Coburn Company 



301 Howard St., 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Write for 
Nearest Dealer. 



443 So. Los Angeles St., 
LOS ANGELES. 



bast for foundation*, dairy floors, fruit dryor floors, ate. etc. 



MT. DIABLO CEMENT 

dryer floors, ate. ate. 

SANTA CRUZ LIME 

MT. DIABLO LIME 



bast for bricklaying and plastering. 



bast for spraying and whitewashing. 
WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICES ON ALL BUILDING MATERIAL. 

HENRY COWELL LIME & CEMENT COMPANY 

9 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



$ 5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



THE 



Stale Fair Futurity Slakes No. 4 

Foals of Maraa Coverad in 1911 to Trot and Paco at Two and Threa Yaars Old. 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



$2,850 for Trotting Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



$2,150 for Pacing Foals. 



California State Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE FEBRUARY 1, '12. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

For Two- Year-Olds to Taka Placa at tha California State Fair, 1914. 

Two-Year-Old Trotters $600 

Two-Year-Old Pacers 400 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started in above and won no money. 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

For Three-Year-Olda to Take Place at tha California State Fair, 1915. 

Three-Year-Old Trotters $1400 

Three- Year-Old Pacers 1100 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started In above and won no money. 



Two-Year-Old Trotters 
Two-Year-Old Pacers 



ENTRANCE FREE — Otherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

$350 Three-Year-Old Trotters 

250 Three-Year-Old Pacers 



$400 
300 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1, 1912, when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; |5 July 1, 1912; 
$5 December 1, 1912; $10 on yearlings February 1, 1913; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1914; $10 on tbree-years-olds February 1, 1915. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace, $25 to start In the two-year-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pace; $50 to start in tha 
'.hree-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair at which the race is to take place. 

No additional entrance "111 be charged in the Consolation StakeN. 

Nominators mutt designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered Is n Trotter or Pacer. 
Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starling nguin in the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITION >. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats 2 In 3, and for three-year-olds, 3 in ~5. Distance for two-year-olds. 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare prow* barren or slips or has a dead fonl or twins, or if either the mnre or foal dies before February 1, IBIS, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mnre or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry he liable for more than amount 
paid in or contracted for. In entries, the name, eolor and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to whieh she was bred in lull. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5000, the amount of the 
guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacng divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes In case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the third heat. 
Races for Three-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the fifth heat. 

Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat in three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown by the 

summary. 

Entries open to the world. 

Write for Entry Blanks to 

A. L. SCOTT, President. C. ALLISON TKI.I'KII, Manager, Sncraiiirntn. Cal. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank, rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 
Breeder and Sportsman 



Advertise in the Breeder and Sportsman 



* 



Saturday, January 13, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



s 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Paolfle Coast. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 



OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Natioual Newspaper Bureau Agent. 219 East 23rd St.. New York City 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Offlce. 

Terms— One Year, $3; Six Months. $1.75; Three Months. $1. 
Foreign postage $1 per year additional ; Canadian postage 50c 

per year additional. »,„_ 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447. 8an Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



IN THIS city Thursday, January 18th, a meeting 
of delegates and representatives of the various agri- 
cultural fair and racing associations will be held 
in the Palace Hotel. This gathering has been called 
by Shirley Christy, secretary of the Phoenix, Ari- 
zona, Fair Association for the purpose of considering 
the advisability of holding a continuous racing cir- 
cuit on the Pacific Coast and arranging meetings 
accordingly. In order to facilitate matters we here- 
with publish the list of dates of meetings held in 
1911 and believe that if those present act in unity 
and arrange dates amicably they will be able to re- 
turn to their respective organizations and convince 
the members thereof that for the good of the in- 
dustry, insuring larger fields of horses, better class 
races and fairer conditions, it will be better to fol- 
low the schedule as decided upon at this meeting. 
The dates claimed last year were as follows: 

PLEAS ANTON July 25-29 inclusive 

P C. T. H. B. A. — Salinas Aug. 2- 5 

WOODLAND Aug. 9-12 

MARYSVILE Aug. 16-19 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR, 

SACRAMENTO Aug. 26-Sept. 2 

VANCOUVER, B. C, Northern 

Circuit Aug. 28-Sept. 2 

PORTLAND, OREGON . . .• Sept. 4- 9 

SEATTLE, WASH Sept. 4- 9 

OREGON STATE FAIR, Salem ... Sept. 11-16 

ALBUQUERQUE Oct. 4-10 

SEATTLE, WASH Sept. 4- 9 

NEWMAN, CAL Sept. 7- 9 

WALLA WALLA, WASH Sept. 18-23 

NORTH YAKIMA, WASH Sept. 25-30 

CHICO, CAL Sept. 26-30 

HANFORD Sept. 25-30 

SPOKANE. WASH Oct. 2-8 

BOISE, IDAHO Oct. 9-14 

FRESNO FAIR Oct. 3- 7 

PHOENIX, ARIZ Nov. 6-11 

It will be seen by the above that the dates of sev- 
eral of the largest meetings conflicted, and the ob- 
ject Mr. Christy had in calling this meeting is to 
prevent its recurrence. It is hoped the meeting will 
be largely attended, as it is really the first logical 
step toward forming a first-class racing circuit on this 
Coast. 

o 

WITH the assumption of office by Mayor Rolph 
and the new Board of Supervisors in San Francisco 
the people have every reason to feel hopeful of the 
future and to still further make the happiness of 
everyone complete, Mayor Rolph has placed upon 
the Board of Park Commissioners two of the ablest 
men in California, Mr. A. B. Spreckels and Judge 
Curtis Lindley. They are men of rare judgment, 
splendid executive ability, and lovers of the beauti- 
ful. Commissioner Spreckels was formerly a mem- 
ber of this Board and the active part he took in its 
administration is not forgotten. He was one of the 
best, if not the best, Park Commissioner San Fran- 
cisco ever had. He took the greatest pride in seeing 
that Golden Gate Park had everything possible for 
the people's comfort: good walks, beautiful lawns, 
rare flowers, playgrounds, tennis courts, little lakes, 
an attractive collection of birds in an aviary second 
to none in America, and a rare zoological collec- 
tion, and contributed from his private funds large 
sums to carry out his pet projects. Frcm boyhood 
he has been identified w.ith the trotting horse indus- 
try. He bred and owned some of the best and fast- 
est campaigners in California. Dione 2:07%, Hulda 
2:08%-, Psyche 2:16y 2 , Zarina 2:13%, Gracie S. 2:22, 
Venus II 2:11%, Crown Princess 2:13%, Chloe 2:24, 
and that great winner of 1911, Bernice R. 2:11%. He 
also owned Cupid 2:18, and Dexter Prince, and many 
others. He engaged in the breeding and racing of 
thoroughbreds and was very successful in this, 
having at present on his beautifully appointed stock 
farm at Napa the largest and best collection of thor- 
oughbreds of any breeder west of Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. For many years he has been a director of 



the P. C. T. H. B. Association. In the conduct and 
care of the Stadium and athletic grounds in Golden 
Gate Park it will be found that he is a true friend 
of every one interested in or engaging in any 
outdoor sports. Judge Lindley is also an ardent en- 
thusiast, and with their associates on the Board 
the people of San Francisco are to be congratulated 
upon having such men to care for the "beauty 
spots" of this fast-growing city. 

o 

GENERAL WOOD is deploring the fact that so 
many thoroughbred stallions are being shipped away 
from America, "because they are just what the 
United States Government wants to use in the breed- 
ing ranks for the siring of remounts for cavalry 
purposes." For almost seventy years there were 
hundreds of thoroughbred stallions standing for pub- 
lic service, yet no one ever heard of our Govern- 
ment's desire to buy geldings for remount purposes 
that were sired by these stallions. In fact, the 
officers wanted stockier built horses, that were more 
of the Morgan type, and a glance through the various 
troops of cavalry horses today on any of our reser- 
vations will convince one that there are very few 
half- or even quarter-bred geldings among them. A 
number of leading horse breeders in the Eastern 
states have lately donated some royally bred stal- 
lions to the Government, and it is almost a certainty 
that when the inspectors come to look their progeny 
over and weigh and measure them they will be 
rejected. Let the United States Government pay 
a good living price for saddle horses and farmers 
and horse breeders will be encouraged to breed 
horses of the proper type to supply the demand. In 
the past there has been so many opportunities for 
"graft" in the selection and purchase of suitable 
horses that many breeders abandoned the idea of 
even letting the officials of the United States Army 
know they had any for sale. Their horses are just 
what the Government needs. They are not half 
thoroughbreds, and should bring a fair price, not 
the mere pittance the Government inspectors claim 
breeders should receive for horses which fill every 
requirement for the army. All this talk about 
keeping thoroughbreds to use on mares for the pro- 
duction of cavalry horses is humbug, pure and sim- 
ple, and is only the expression of some enthusiastic 
horseowner who is using this splendid officer as a 
mouthpiece to sell his useless stock. 

o 

THE example set by the late Wm. Land in be- 
queathing $250,000 for a park in Sacramento, $200,- 
000 for the relief of the indigent poor, and the many 
thousands for the leading charities in the city he 
loved,— the city that he recognized as having claims 
upon him for the liberal portion of wealth he was 
enabled to accumulate during his long and active 
life there, — is one that is seldom followed by philan- 
thropists of this generation. The deceased was a 
plain, blunt, straight-forward man. He felt that 
he had an object to live for, and that was to have all 
who were dependent upon him comfortable and to 
leave the bulk of his fortune to. make the citizens of 
Sacramento happy, and relieve those who, by ill- 
ness or misfortune, became wards of the city and 
county. Never since the days of General John A. 
Sutter has anyone who, because of the opportunities 
Sacramento presented to him, remembered her in 
this way. There were scores who came and laid 
the foundations of their fortunes there, and when 
other cities called them, took all their wealth away, 
and tried to forget the start they received in that 
city on the banks of the Sacramento river. Wm. 
Land's name will live when these men are all for- 
gotten, for in this act he has set an example which 
might well be followed by others to their ever- 
lasting credit. 



THE BIENNIAL meeting or congress of members 
of the National Trotting Association will be held at 
the Murray Hill Hotel, New York, at noon, Wednes- 
day, February 14, 1912, in accordance with Article 
VII, Section 1, of the by-laws. Prof. E. P. Heald, 
President of the P. C. T. H. B. Association, has been 
invited to act with the Committee on Rules, and 
will go as a representative of the Pacuic Coast mem- 
bers. 



IT IS a penal offense to insert a fraudulent adver- 
tisement in any newspaper passing through the 
mails. Two horse "gyps" in Philadelphia, Pa., who 
used to publish the most alluring advertisements 
about horses they had for sale "that had to be sold 
as they belonged to some doctor's widow," or "some 
fine family horse that had always been a pet," etc., 
are now serving six years at hard labor, and Postal 
Inspector Corlclyou has given orders for every post- 
master to run villains of their kind to earth. Here 
in San Francisco we notice there are some adver- 
tisements in the daily newspapers that should be 
investigated, for many of the horses so well de- 
scribed never "fill the bill." Swindling by the use 
of the mails has been rendered so hazardous that 
crookedly inclined horse dealers in the East are 
hunting some other means for earning a livelihood. 



SOME crwners of highly-bred trotting stallions do 
not care (so long as they can have enough mares 
sent to their horses at a low service fee) how the 
mares that are booked to these stallions are bred. 
In three or four years these stallion owners are won- 
dering why the 2:30 list does not contain the names 
of any of the progeny of their horses, and these 
broodmare owners who patronized them before are 
not even booking their most ordinary mares to 
them. It is about time these "penny wise and pound 
foolish" stallion owners realize that in pursuing this 
policy they are in a fair way to lose all they in- 
vested in their high-priced, royally-bred stallions. 
If they will only stop and consider that they should 
do their utmost to enhance the value of these stal- 
lions by striving to get the patronage of the choic- 
est bred mares, the best speed-producing matrons, 
and those that have records, the produce thereafter 
would be making a reputation for their horses on 
the race track; and the increase in valuation of these 
as money-winners and record-makers would also be 
enhancing the value of their stallions. Let such 
owners consider what would be the value of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%, Nutwood 2:18%, Guy Wilkes 2:15%, 
Onward 2:25V£, Peter the Great 2:07%, Moko, or any 
of the other priceless sires, if they were not adver- 
tised, so as to attract the attention of owners of the 
choicest of mares and their merits as sires extolled. 
For purposes of this class of advertising the 
"Breeder and Sportsman" is one of the very best 
mediums published in the United States. It goes into 
the homes of every owner of a good well-bred mare, 
evey speed-producer, and every mare holding a re- 
cord on this coast, whose owners become deeply in- 
terested in the breeding, conformation and perform- 
ances of these stallions, and, if the right ones appeal 
to them as proper mates for their mares they do not 
hesitate to make arrangements to ship them. Thus 
it can be seen that money is not wasted when used 
to advertise good stallions. It is better to get a few 
of the best mares than to breed such stallions to 
a hundred ordinary ones owned by folks that live 
in the neighborhood and never will develop their 
produce. Such patronage is better to be avoided 
than encouraged. Many a good stallion in Califor- 
nia had has all his chances ruined as a money- 
maker by just such methods, and, instead of bringing 
from $10,000 to $25,000, he has been sold for a few 
hundred dollars by the owner, who was totally un- 
fitted to have him. 

o 

DEATH OF M. M. DONNELLY. 



Last Saturday evening this well known horseman 
passed away after a brief illness, the immediate 
cause of his death being pneumonia. The deceased 
was stricken Wednesday, and on Thursday sank into 
unconsciousness and failed to recover. "Mike" Don- 
nelly, as he was more intimately known, was born 
in Flint, Michigan, 47 years ago, and when a boy 
moved to South Bend, Indiana, where he was appren- 
ticed in the blacksn.ithing trade. He became one 
of the most skillful workmen in the shop he worked 
in, and being always a great enthusiast wherever 
trotting horses were, he began to drive them and 
proved to be a very skillful reinsman, piloting many 
winners in Colorado He gradually moved farther 
West and finally settled in San Francisco, where 
he engaged in the horse shoeing business and soon 
built up a fine trade. As a workman he had few 
superiors. Years ago he saw the benefits of having 
a circular mile track in Golden Gate Park in prefer- 
ence to the old straightaway course there, and 
became so enthusiastic ho paid a surveyor to lay 
out a track to prove his contentions crrrect. He 
was an active member of the Park and San Fran- 
cisco Driving Clubs, and drove in many of their 
matinees. He was a very quiet, whole-souled man, 
who never made any enemies and was respected by 
all who knew him. He leaves a widow and one 
child to mourn his loss. His friends in all walks 
of life were many, and his funeral was largely 
attended. 

C. McCarty, owner of a splendid broodmare by 
Prodigal and her two colts, one a three-year-old by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16V£ and the other a four-months' 
old filly by Bon McKinney 2:28 has Rone to the San 
Jose race track and joined Joe Twohig in the hitter's 
training stable. When Ted Hayes sees this Bon Mc- 
Kinney he will want to buy it, just to show what 
beautiful foals Mr. Clark's good young horse sires. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 



EXPOSITION PARK, LOS ANGELES. 

Some Events Connected With the Old Park and 
Features That Make the New One 
Unsurpassed. 



By Wm. G. Layng. 

A sale of land was held in 1866, six miles from 
the old Court House, in Los Angeles, and 160 acres 
of this (which was only a sandy plain) was pur- 
chased for $6000 by some men who had combined 
to get it for the purpose of building a park devoted 
to the holding of annual fairs and, in conjunction 
therewith, a mile track upon which racing could be 
held. They knew that when they had a plant worthy 
of the name and had formed a fair and agricultural 
association, they would receive State aid for its ad- 
vancement and for premiums. 

Charles Durfee then erected an eight foot board 
fence around it, and to pay for this and to build the 
track, grandstand, stables and other necessary build- 
ings, the tract was mortgaged. Some dissatisfaction 
arose between some of the members of the organiz- 
ation and finally the mortgagor foreclosed on the 
property for the $9000 loaned and interest. Then 
a meeting was held by those who had the interests 
of racing uppermost in their minds, and a company 
was formed with a paid up capital of $13,000 divided 
into 130 shares of $100 each, with this inducement 
to shareholders: forty acres on the western end of 
the property was set aside to be divided into lots and 
every holder of a share was entitled to one of these 
lots. The most prominent of these men were L. J. 
Rose, Hancock M. Johnson (son of Gen. Sidney John- 
son), George Hines, J. H. Hollenbeck, Chas. Durfee, 
Capt. J. C. Newton, L. H. Titus, Wm. Ferguson and 
Newton Moore. After reorganization, L. J. Rose pro- 
posed, in order to avoid any more trouble should 
adversity overtake their enterprise, that they give a 
trust deed of the property to the State of California, 
the property to be devoted to the holding of an ag- 
ricultural fair in perpetuity. Judge O'Melveney 
drew up the trust deed but unfortunately omitted 
to mention the words "race track." This was the 
cause of much litigation. Governor Gage, the lead- 
ing attorney there, was engaged by the stockholders 
to rectify this error of omission, but finally all his 
efforts failed and the commissioners set aside the 
lower portion for the location of the track, where it 
is now made. C. A. Canfield, one of the leading men 
in Southern California, contributing thousands for the 
expense of making it as it is today. 

But 1 am digressing. After the tract was first 
enclosed a mile track was surveyed and made, a 
makeshift grandstand, club house and some stables 
built. A pavilion was then erected for the holding 
of agricultural and mechanical exhibits, and small 
paddocks made in which cattle, sheep and hogs 
were to be exhibited for premiums. 

With that enthusiasm which always marked a new 
era in the sporting line — especially when it. appealed 
to the old Spanish, Mexicans and frontiersmen who 
predominated there. — the first race meetings were re- 
markably successful. Men and women rode hundreds 
of miles to attend, and the country was scoured for 
the best and fastest race horses, for the racing was 
principally confined to running events: quarter and 
half-mile dashes, mile, two-mile and five-mile racing, 
and even at longer distances, with changes of riders 
on these longer stretches every mile. There were 
vaquero races, and exhibitions of rough riding which 
were the means of bringing forth many ounces of 
glittering gold for betting purpcses. Everybody 
seemed willing to take a chance, and money was 
plentiful enough to keep everything at fever heat 
night and day during this, the festal week og the 
year. The plains and valleys near the Santa Ynez 
mountains were the pastures for herds of cattle, 
bands of horses and flocks of sheep, — these formed 
the principal sources of revenue. It cost very little 
for pasturage as the country was only sparsely set- 
tled and railroads were unknown. 

As stated above, among the first to come to this 
track and see a future for it was Charles Durfee, 
the well-known horseman, and in 1872 he planted 
those beautiful rows of eucalyptus and pepper trees 
in front of, and in the rear of the long rows of stalls 
which were built like the spokes of a wheel, the ends 
facing the first curve on this elliptical course. In 
time, the foliage from these trees afforded delight- 
ful shade from the heat of the sun's rays and made 
this one of the most picturesque of all the race 
tracks in California. A few of these trees are still 
there, and it was with feelings of sorrow the other 
day I saw the contractor making his preparations 
to cut out the only clump of trees which remained 
in the infield. But they obstruct the view and the 
space occupied by them can be utilized for better 
purposes. 

The late L. J. Rose was one of the pioneers in 
this part of California. He owned a beautiful tract 
of land in the famous San Gabriel Valley about ten 
miles from Los Angeles, where he had achieved 
quite a reputation for the excellence of the vines he 
planted and wines he made. He had rows of fruit 
trees and fields of alfalfa, — the latter being about 
the first seen in this State. The place was appro- 
priately called "Sunny Slope," and became one of 
the leading attractions in a region where well-tilled 
farms and beautiful meadows were almost unknown. 
Mr. Rose was an ardent lover of good horses, and 
as he seemed gifted with an almost prophetic vision 
as to the success of the trotting horse horse indus- 
try, he decided to go east and bring out a few good 
stallions and mares, breed them, and develop their 
produce. So he journeyed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 



and purchased The Moor by Clay Pilot, a stallion 
called Overland and two mares: Minnehaha (that 
afterwards produced eight trotters in the list, in- 
cluding Beautiful Bells 2:29%, the dam of eleven 
standard performers), and Barbara, these three were 
by Bald Chief, a son of Alexander's Bay Chief. Be- 
sides these, he purchased Gretchen by Mambrino 
Pilot, Maggie Mitchell, and several others, and 
took them to "Sunny Slope," where he built a track 
and placed them in charge of Jim Hurd, a brother-in- 
law to Dr. Herr, of Mambrino Patchen fame. Mr. 
Rose soon learned that this trainer was not the man 
he wanted, so he hired and discharged in succession: 
Hank McGregor, Billy Donathan, "Doc" Williams, 
Andy McDowell, and Dick Havey. Finally, he eni- 
ployed the latter's "understudy,' a very quiet young 
man named Walter Maben, and with him success 
after success followed his long series of rac'ng mis- 
fortunes. This was early in the seventies. Although 
all of Rose's horses had been raced on this mile 
track and were defeated with a regularity that would 
have disheartens 1 a more !e°olute man, Maben 
turned the tide and Mr. Ros<j never wavered in his 
admiration of and gratitude to him. 

Captain A. J. Jchnson, of San Diego, then came to 
the track with old Pele, by Williamson's Belmont, 
out of Liz Given3, by imported Langford. She was 
a full sister to Bonnie Belle, Langford (sire of Thad 
Stevens), Gladiator and Error, all famous race 
horses. This m?re Pele was the first, thorouehhred 
to beat the native horse Bandera, that belonged 
to the Machado Bros., which, before that eventful 
race, had never met defeat. Capt. Johnson won a 
"pot of money" on his mare. He also owned a very 
fair trotter called Belle, and won several races with 
her. His trainer being "Whispering" Johnny Dona- 
hue, whom I met at the recent Fresno fair for the 
first time in twenty years, and, to my astonishment, 
he did not appear to be a day older, neither did he 
show any sign of losing his ability to handle 
trotters. 

L. H. Titus, another enthusiastic horseman, then 
brought the handsome Hambletonian stallion Echo 
from the East. Hancock Johnson bought Crichton, 
by Imported Glencoe, and the pure white stallion 
A. W. Richmond, from my old friend, Jos. Cairn Simp- 
son. Senator Finn Slaughter, of San Bernardino, had 
several pretty fair trotters, so did E. L. Mayberry, 
who had, among others, Lady Washington, the dam 
of Geo. W. McKinney 2:14%, etc. Louis Wolf skill, 
one of the members of the famous family of that 
name, had three or four, and W. H. Robinson, also 
owned some splendidly bred trotters. There were a 
few others that were always ready to make entries 
in the races "just to make 'em interestin'." Wm. 
(Monte) Smith being one of these. 

Chas. Durfee was, in those days, a "running-horse 
man.'" He had a big livery and sale stable in Los 
Angeles, and always kept a few "good ones on the 
side." His jockey was Walter Maben (that was be- 
fore the latter became interested in trotters), and 
Mr. Durfee says, he was the "kingpin among the 
boys there." He could ride anything, was a gcod 
judge of pace and always had light hands. One race 
Mr. Durfee tells about that Walter won for him 
was such a notable affair that he says he never 
will forget it, and he is sure the backers of the other 
horses feel the same way. It was a quarter mile 
dash. The sprinter he owned was a noted equine 
celebrity called Walking John. With 126 pounds 
on his back and a heavy flat English riding saddle, 
this horse ran a quarter in 22% seconds, timed by 
several horsemen. It was the fastest quarter mile 
race ever seen, and Walking John, at that time, was 
well along in years. The story of this horse was a 
remarkable one: Some years previous there was a 
"quarter hoss" man named Dick Kitchen, who had 
been very successful in picking up and training 
"short horses," and earned quite a reputation as a 
judge of this class of sprinters, besides, he had ac- 
cumulated considerable wealth. Having heard of a 
wonderful mare that was racing at Santa Fe, New 
Mexico, which had never suffered defeat: and that any 
amount up to $100,000 could be obtained in wagers 
against her, if anyone had a quarter-horse that 
could head her, he immediately determined to get 
busy, for that money "looked good to him." So he 
journeyed to Kansas City and had almost given 
up hope of getting the one he wanted, when he hap- 
pened to notice a young girl driving a fine looking 
golden chestnut gelding to a buggy. The horse stood 
almost 16 hands high and was the best muscled 
one he had ever seen. His practiced eye detected 
that this horse was a thoroughbred. He tried to 
buy him from the girl, but she would not sell. He 
then heard that her father was a banker, and after 
making his errand known to him it did not take 
long to give twenty shining twenty-dollar gold pieces 
and take the horse away. He found the animal was 
fast walker, so he called him Walking John, and rode 
him almost 2000 miles across the plains and desert to 
Santa Fe. On this journey there were times and 
places where he galloped his mount fast quarters. 
He then became convinced from what he had seen that 
when he got to Santa Fe he would give that great 
mare the race of her life. Walking John was put up 
in a livery stable in Santa Fe, and Dick sauntered 
in to where the owners of the fast mare were, and, 
in a few moments, the match was made. When the 
day of the race arrived there never was such an 
assemblage seen of white men, cowboys, ranchers 
and gamblers, Indians and Mexicans, all prepared 
to wager everything: Coin, jewelry, blankets and 
clothes, on the mare. In those days money was 
wagered on the first fifty yards, 100 yards, 150 yards, 
etc. Those who bet on the winner at these different 
points took the money. Thousands were wagered 



and Dick Kitchen lost at every point, until the last 
one of fifty yards, when Walking John beat the mare 
by a neck. Kitchen pocketed over $20,000 on the re- 
sult and rode Walking John across the desert into 
California. This horse became foundered and could 
not be warmed up and then be allowed to cool out 
before a race, for he would become so stiff he could 
hardly walk, but, when taken out and galloped 
around slowly until his rivals were on the mark, he 
would walk up beside them and get away at the first 
word. He raced in Sacramento, Oakland, and San 
Jose, and finally was taken to Los Angeles, where, 
on account cf his infirmity, he was raffled and Chas. 
Durfee won him. In his hands the horse improved 
and won several good matches. Durfee could get no 
horses to race against him, so the horse was raffled 
again, and a man named Harvey McClain, having 
shaken the highest throw in dice, got him. For two 
years Walking John had a life of ease. One day 
Dave Bridges came to the Los Angeles track and said 
he had matched his mare Nellie Grant against an- 
other quarter mare called Flora, and Durfee, seeing 
there might be a chance to get into this, sent for 
Walking John. When the old horse saw the track 
he pricked up his ears, walked behind Nellie Grant, 
and as the word was given, went by her like a shot, 
passed Flora, and came in a winner. This was the 
race Walter Maben rode. • 

It was on this old track that Charles Durfee and 
Billy Donathan made their first appearance as trot- 
ting hcrse drivers. The former had a horse called 
Enoch Arden, by Billy Blossom and the latter one 
called Man Eater. Honors were even in the first 
two heats of this rpce, but in turning around for 
the other, their horses shied and in a second as the 
big high-wheeled sulkies collided, Durfee was on 
the ground. Owing to the fact that these young 
men had only one sulky apiece the race was declared 
off. This horse Enoch Arden defeated nearly all 
of L. J. Rose's horses. He could trot in 2:27 and do 
it nicely, and was a good mcney winner for his proud 
owner and driver. 

It was over this course that Tom Mott's Lugo, a 
California mustang, took all of L. J. Rose's trot- 
ters into camp, and many of the spectators predicted 
he was a second Dexter. So I could go on recalling 
incidents of those days of exciting joy and hilarity, of 
the heavy betting and strange characters met at 
these race meetings. The games of chance of every 
conceivable kind by the army of men who "bucked 
the tiger," "played the wheel," sat down to all night 
poker games, rolled tombola, chucked props, dealt 
monte, played ronda, and shook dice, fcr heavy 
stakes in the club house. 

The growth of the trotting horse industry and the 
influx of so many enthusiasts in the sport from the 
far East and Middle West created a demand for 
better trotting races, better horses, and better con- 
ducted meetings. The old quarter-horse men were 
gradually forced to go with the Mexicans, Spaniards, 
cow punchers and sheep herders, and finally they 
became a thing of the past as "drawing features" 
at these fairs. The trotting horse men had all the 
opportunities they wanted for wagering money on 
the races, auctions and Pari-mutuel pools being plen- 
tiful. That was another reason why the old games 
of chance were gradually stamped out. The reins 
of government of this agricultural association were 
placed in different hands, and, thus guided, its pro- 
gress was never impeded until Gov. Budd lopped 
off the appropriation for district fairs. Prior to that 
fatal day many races held there are still remembered 
as the most exciting ever seen on this coast. The 
Stamboul-Arab race where the former, driven by 
Walter Maben, a mere boy, defeated the latter, 
driven by Orrin A. Hiekok, the celebrated reinsman, 
and incidentally causing the latter and his backers 
to lose over $20,000 on the result. Then there were 
the races where McKinnev 2: 11%, Wanda 2:14%, 
W. Wood 2:07, Frank M. 2:17%, Waldo J. 2:08, Silk- 
wood 2:07, Silas Skinner 2:17, Sweet Marie 2:02, 
Sonoma Girl 2:04, Carlokin 2:07%, Copa de Oro 1:59, 
Primrose 2:09, Welcome Mack 2:07, Belmont 2:09%, 
Miss Georgie 2:08%, Zolock 2:05%, Delilah 2:06, 
Queen Pomona 2:05%, Silver Dick 2:09%, Bon Voy- 
age 2:08, Blanche 2:06%, Nordwell 2:08%, and scores 
of other good horses — the best in California, — drew 
thousands into the grounds and new grandstand 
which replaced the old one. 

But those days have passed away and naught but 
the remembrance of them remains, for the eld track 
with its many buildings (save one), has been de- 
stroyed. Even the title "Agricultural Park" which 
greeted the visitor at the entrance is obliterated. 
In its stead, the name of this, the most beautiful 
race rack and grounds in America, is changed to 
"Exposition Park." What a transition! As I alighted 
from the electric car and walked over to where the 
old entrance used to be, I felt lost, for I could not 
realize this was the same place I had spent those 
days of pleasure and excitement so many years ago. 
There are no traces of the old track, the new one 
crosses its site at right angles, the three-quarter pole 
being where the grandstand was. Instead of lying 
north and south, this one is east and west, the back 
of the new grand stand will face the setting sun, a 
most desirable feature for spectators. 

But what a track this new one is! The picture 
cn our front page gives but a faint outline of its 
beauty. In shape it is almost a copy of the fast 
one at North Randall. Ohio. On the homestretch it 
is seventy-two feet wide and on the back stretch it 
is fortyfive feet. This track will be inclosed by a 
new shrub fence made of privet, cypress or haw- 
thorn. The inner fence is a neat panel one and 
divides this course from the one inside, which is to 
be used exclusively for exercising horses. Inside 



Saturday, January 13, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



this track is another on which automobile, bicycle 
and motorcycle races will be held. The gradient of 
the outer track is three-quarters of an inch to the 
foot making it very fast and safe. No better evi- 
dence of this is needed than the fact that the stallion 
Carlokin 2:07% has trotted miles in 2:09% over it, 
and the course is not considered "settled" yet. The 
infield lies some distance below the track. It is 
being leveled and rolled and will be converted into 
a grass-covered military parade ground, athletic field 
and play grounds. There will be two subway en- 
trances, thus obviating crossing over the track. 
There will be a series of barns screened from view 
with dense shrubery, and these will be subdivided 
into large, well-ventilated, fourteen feet square box 
stalls, with every convenience that experience has 
taught and money can buy. In front of these long 
barns wooden awnings will extend about twelve feet 
so as to insure shade and places to "cool out" the 
horses. 

The grandstand will set back from the outer edge 
of the track about fifty feet, and be elevated twelve 
feet above the course. It is to be built at an angle 
so as to afford every occupant a perfect view of 
the horses as they enter the stretch without com- 
pelling spectators to arise to the annoyance of their 
neighbors. The grandstand is to be made of con- 
crete, and will seat 5000 people comfortably. 

The judges' stand will be a neat little structure 
placed on the outer edge of the track, just as the ma- 
jority of those are on our most modern tracks. 

There are about one hundred and seventeen acres 
in this inclosure, and to get this acreage con- 
siderable property had to be purchased at high 
prices from private owners. There is a force of sixty 
men with teams levelling and grading this land pre- 
paratory to making it the most beautiful park for 
recreation and rest west of Chicago, and, it is a ques- 
tion if there is any place in America to surpass it. 
There are eight car lines to the park, and it only 
takes twenty minutes for passengers to ride from 
Seventh and Broadway, the center of Los Angeles, 
to any of its entrances. 

Over $1,150,000 will be expended on this magnifi- 
cent property ere it is finished. Adjacent to the 
track, and within the limits of this park, there has 
just been erected a State (permanent) Exposition 
Building, costing $250,000; and a County Museum and 
Art Building, costing $240,000. These are models 
of architectural beauty— both exterior and interior — 
built of brick with stone facings and are of the 
very latest and most approved designs, with plenty 
of heat and ventilation. There will be another at- 
traction here, called the "Sunken Garden," similar 
to the famous one in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, 
but much larger, having an electric fountain. There 
is to be a beautiful lake with a cement coping about 
it, surrounding this Sunken Garden. A $200,000 ar- 
mory will be erected here, which will surpass any 
on the Pacific Ccast, and from it to the parade 
ground the boulevard, as well as all others on this 
place, will be wide and smooth, with water always 
flowing in drains on each side. 

There is also to be a playground, exclusively for 
children, whicu will cover a plat of about seven 
acres in extent. 1 his will be ornamented with 
shrubs, shade trees, flowers, and lawns. All the latest 
appliances such as merry-go-rounds, carousals, 
swings, seesaws, toboggan slides, are to be erected, 
and a little track whereon pony and goat carts will 
be provided, besides every novelty that can be 
thought of to amuse the happy little ones. Besides, 
the biggest and best bath house in the United States 
and other improvements to make this all its projectors 
and enthusiastic founders contemplated. 

The fairs, race meetings, and livestock shows to 
be held here will create an interest among all classes 
that has never been dreamed of in the past, and Los 
Angeles, as well as the State of California, will reap 
untold benefits from it, for it will take its place 
among the manifold attractions of the south. 

The Los Angeles Driving Club, composed of 
128 of the wealthiest men in Southern California, 
will hold their matinees here throughout the year. 
Seme of the members own horses that money cannot 
buy and the pleasure they derive from racing these 
is indescribable. Every member of this thriving 
organization loves a good horse and is doing every- 
thing possible toward making this place one of the 
most inviting and hospitable to invite their friends. 
A club house will be erected in its vicinity, with 
the latch string always hanging outside, where 
the fame of Southern California hospitality will never 
be tarnished and where every member will feel he is 
appointed a committee of one to entertain guests. 

Great credit is due the members of the Sixth Ag- 
ricultural District Association for the work they have 
done and are doing to make this one of the greatest 
shows places in California. Their names should be 
imperishably inscribed and placed where the pres- 
ent and future generations can see them: President, 
Will, M. Bowen; Joseph F. Sartori, treasurer; F. B. 
Davison, secretary, and Frank Wiggins, manager. 
The Board of Directors consists of W. M. Bowen, Geo. 
R. Murdock, John Parkinson, F. E. Pierce, John H. 
Reynolds, James Slauson, N. W. - Thompson, and 
Perry W. Wiedner. Dr. Wm. Dodge has also been 
very active in pushing this work through, and the 
Board of Park Commissioners of Los Angeles has 
done everything possible to assist the agricultural 
association in their great undertaking. The Park 
Commissioners are: Mayor Geo. Alexander, Henry 
O'Mulvenny, J. B. Lippincott, Chas. H. Randall, and 
Judge Chas. Silent. The architect of this California 
Exposition Park is Wilbur David Cook, Jr., of Los 
Angeles. 



andy McDowell's career. 



According to recent advices from Philadelphia, 
the veteran reinsman Andrew McDowell has adopted 
the Quaker City metropolis as his home. He was 
born in Kingston, Can., July 3, 1847, and has been 
a prominent factor on the trotting turf for over 
4i years, traveling from Maine to Mexico, and from 
the Atlantic to Pacific coasts, besides putting in five 
years' service as driver and trainer in Austria and 
Russia. He has driven on more tracks than any 
other man on earth. 

In his early life McDowell was a dealer in fast 
stock and began his turf career as a driver at the 
age of 19 years in Canada, with the trotter George 
Dorsey, thta was afterward sold for $8000. This 
horse Dorsey was also the first trotter he drove on 
a grand circuit track (Buffalo) in 1880-81, when his 
skill as a reinsman attracted the attention of Count 
Valensin and Monroe Salisbury, who induced him to 
train and drive the Salisbury string of Pleasantoti, 
Cal. McDowell was in the employ of Salisbury for 
eight years, then took charge of the Marcus Daly 
string in Montana for two years at a salary of $10,- 
000 per annum. He then drifted back to Salisbury 
for another year and since that period has been hus- 
tling on his own account as driver for different 
stock farms, including John Shultz, of New York; 
Penn Valley, near Morrisville, for various European 
owners during his five years' trip abroad, and for 
Mrs. Dan McPhee. 

McDowell's greatest success -occurred during the 
period that he was employed by Salisbury, when he 
got the title of the "White Knight," owing to his 
appearing dressed in white costume in all of His 
races. He afterward drove Alix 2:03%, by Patron- 
age, to a world's record, beating Nancy Hanks' 1 ? time 
of 2:04. He also gave Flying Jib, pacer, with run- 
ning mate, a mark of 1:58%. 

He started his California career by driving Edema, 
by Endymion, in a race against Shylock, by Tom Bon- 
ton, in 2:13%, setting a new track record for the 
San Jose, Cal., track. At Fresno, in 1895, he drove 
the black colt Directly, by Direct, against his two- 
year-old record of 2:07%, winning in 2:07%. The 
same year he drove Flying Jib in 2:05% and Ali:; in 
2:04%, the mile by Alix smashing all Pacific Coast 
records. At Galesburg, 111., he made a new world's 
record of 2:03% with Alix, accompanied by a pace- 
maker driven by Charles J. Jones. Time by quar- 
ters, :30y 2 , 1:01%, 1:32%, 2:03%. Alix defeated 
Directum at Mystic Park, Medford, Mass., for a purse 
of $11,000. The time of the first heat was 2.14%. 
Then Directum went an exhibition mile in 2:07%. 
first half in 1:03%. At Napa, Cal., he drove Home- 
stake in a race against Hazel Wilkes, Emma Temple 
and Maggie E. in 2:15%, 2:14%, 2:14%, then the 
fastest time on record in the State. 

Among the many horses, trotters and pacers that 
McDowell has driven and marked in this country are: 
Flying Jib, to pole, with running mate, 1:58%; Alix, 
by Patronage 2:03%, exhibition mile, and 2:04% in 
a race; Azote 2:04%, by Whips; Ccney, by McKinnev, 
pacer, to wagon 2:05%; in harness in a race, 2:02; 
Yolo Maid, pacer, by Alexander Button 2:14, at three 
years old, 2:12% at four years; Cricket, by Stein- 
way, pacer 2:10 (world's record for mares in 1891): 
Georgena 2:07%, by Epaulet; Lena N. 2:05%, by 
Sidney; Direct 2:05%, by Director; Directly (2) 
2:07%, by Direct; Margaret S. 2:12, by Director; 
Expressive (3) 2:12%, by Electioneer; Edenia 
2:13%, by Endymion; Doc Sperry 2:09, by Altamont, 
and Adair 2:14%. 

While in Europe McDowell had remarkable suc- 
cess with American-bred trotters. He won the trot- 
ting championship of Europe with Louis W. Winans' 
Wig Wag, by Wiggins, dam Edgelight, in the race 
for four-year-olds, mile heats, in 2:14, 2:13%, the 
stake carrying with it the championship gold medal. 
With Levente, by E. L. Robinson 2:17%, son of 
Epaulet, dam Leola, by Quartermaster, he won the 
Austrian trotting Derby at Vienna, there having been 
more money wagered on the race than on any other 
previous event in Austria — over 480,000 kronens. 
With Belle Kuser, by Colonel Kuser, he was second 
to Freund Fritz, by Simmons, in the Summer Prize, 
20,000 kronens, at Vienna, open for international 
horses, two in three heats, in 2:10, 2:14, 2:13. With 
Wig Wag he also won the Greenbrino Prize at Baden 
and only lost one race out of five starts. 

Twenty-eight years ago this globe trotting reins- 
man married Miss Maggie Floyd, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edmund P. Floyd, of Oakland, Cal., who has 
accompanied him on all of his campaigns in this 
country and abroad. During the past two years Mc- 
Dowell has been located in Philadelphia, taking 
things easy and driving occasionally on the half-mile 
tracks. His latest stake win was with Clowney, two 
years old, by Admiral Dewey, dam Santa Clara, by 
Lancewood, at Belmont track, Narberth, Pa. 

Owners of stallions should lose no time in adver- 
tising them. Mroodmare owners are anxiously wait- 
ing to see what stallions they will patronize. Re- 
member the "Breeder and Sportsman" is the only 
weekly publication on the Pacific Coast devoted 
exclusively to this branch of horse industry and it 
reaches every owner of a good mare, the very ones 
stallion owners should strive to communicate with, 
and the best and most satisfactory way to do this 
is through an advertisement in this journal. 
o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



LOS ANGELES DRIVING CLUB. 

The winter and spring racing season will be 
replete with matinees, according to the present pro- 
gram outlined by the Los Angeles Driving Club. 

The completion of the new track at Exposition 
Park has served to revive interest in the sport, and 
the owners of speedy trotters and pacers are eager 
to experience again the thrill and the exhilaration 
which are the reward of the man who manipulates 
the "ribbons" in competition of this sort. 

So marked is the enthusiasm of some of the mem- 
bers that they favor holding matinees at the rate 
of two a month during the winter and spring. Others 
believe that this is crowding the calendar a little, 
and argue that one big show a month would be better 
than two small ones. This is a matter which the 
club will decide within a short time. 

Meantime preparations are being made for putting 
on a star matinee at Exposition Park on February 
22, and Secretary Delorey is already formulating 
plans for it. 

The local racing season will continue until the lat- 
ter part of April. The horses will then be given a 
month's rest in preparation for the summer cam- 
paign on the Grand and other circuits. 

The new course is one of the fastest in the coun- 
try, and with this aid it is possible that several of 
the club records, some of which have stood for years, 
will be shattered during the present season. It is 
this possibility, some say probability, that will give 
an added zest to the next few months of racing. 
Club records which have not yet been lowered are as 
follows: 

Exhibition mile, trotting— Sonoma Girl, 2:07. 
Fastest mile in race, trotting— Carlokin, 2:08. 
Exhibition, wagon, trotting — Belmonte, 2:10. 
Fastest mile in race, pacing— Copa de Oro, 2:07. 
Exhibition, wagon, pacing— Miss Georgie, 2:10. 
Fastest two heats, pacing— Welcome Mack, 2:08% 
and 2:08%. 

A number of promising yearling trotters, includ- 
ing Zombowage, by Nobage, a stallion owned by A. 
S. Kellogg of Fresno, Zombowage belongs to Ted 
Hayes; Dr. Hagan, a bay colt belonging to Henry 
Berrv, and Carsto, a bay son of Carlokin and the 
property of W. N. Tiffany, are expected to make 
history in the juvenile ranks during the season. 
This trio trotted three beautiful half-mile heats on 
Christmas day and, while Carsto won the race, all 
the heats were close and warmly contested right 
down to the wire. Carsto took the second heat in 
1:14, which is stepping some for a baby. 

Carsto celebrated the day he was eleven months 
old by doing cne-eighth of a mile in :22%, trotting 
the last sixteenth in :10 flat. At the age of two and 
a half months Carsto was placed in light training, 
jogging air ne the road at the side of his mother. At 
three and one-half mcnths old this youngster, trot- 
ting beside his mother, did a sixteenth in :12%. 

This colt is entered in futurity events for two 
and three-year-olds, with stakes aggregating about 
$85 000. Because Carsto was born March 10, 1910 
after most of the futurity events for 1910 colts had 
closed Tiffany had to enter him in several f' tunties 
which may be likened to taking time by the forelock. 
— Tribune. 

THE ANTIQUITY OF RACING. 



The race horse in the eyes of many is a necessary 
evil From the days of Ptolomy down to the present, 
men have raced horses in spite of all manners of op- 
position, raised by the many fanatics and individuals 
who seem to hold the belief that they were created 
for the sole purpose, of directing affairs in keeping 
with their narrow and warped ideas. 

In Wallace's "Ben Hur," he makes his description 
of the chariot race the most beautiful and interesting 
chapter of his "Tale of Christ," and when the mag- 
nificent story was staged, the reproduction of the 
race proved to be an attraction of the greatest value. 

The Egyptians, Babylonians and Assyrians raced 
horses, Cyrus had a stable of the vary best obtain- 
able; so had many prominent Greeks and Romans, 
and without even the slightest degree of abate- 
ment in the interest of the sport, it has gone on 
down the centuries, even to the present one. 

Job's best description is of the horse— his very 
poorest, of his wife. And yet from what we learn, 
his peculiar physical condition certainly required 
more assistance from the gentle touch of the tender 
female, than from the "war horse who snuffeth t e 
battle afar off." 

Solomon, too, had more horses than wives. From 
what we can learn, that vigorous gentleman whose 
chief desire appeared to be to raise fine horses and 
thankless children, managed to always keep up about 
three horses for every new bride he took unto him- 
self. 

There is hardly a great man in history, which can 
be touched by a pen, but speaks of his favorite 
horse. 

Darwin once said, that man was distinguished from 
all other animals in that he laughs; and we may as 
well add, that a civilized man is distinguished from all 
other men, in that he will bet on a horse race. It is 
wrong, we admit; just as it is wrong to bet on the 
price of stocks, grain, raffle off any article, or make 
a bill with your grocer when (he chances are "ten to 
one" that you will never pay it— and a hundred other 
kinds of wagering. We can't stop it— being inher- 
ited from our earliest ancestors and will no doubt re- 
main with us till the end of time. But we may do 
one thing — we may refrain from betting ourselves, 
and if people must bet on a horse race, we should 
insist that the race be an honest one. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 



1 NOTES AND NEWS | 

Send in your items. 



A horse with flat feet is only fit for slow work. 



We have unsurpassed facilities for tabulating pedi- 
grees and publishing stallion cards. 



Remember, entries to the State Fair Futurity 
Stakes No. 4, value $5000 will close February 1st. 



Jas. Thompson is handling quite a string of trot- 
ters and pacers at the Sacramento track this winter. 

J. Twohig, the well-known trainer, has moved his 
string of trotters and pacers to the San Jose race 
track. 



Mr. G. M. McPherson, the well known horseman 
of Montreal, Canada, left Pleasanton last Friday 
lor Los Angeles. 



Beazley, 2:12, a full brother to Branaham Baugh- 
man, 2:05)4, by Gambetta Wilkes, is one of the most 
successful sires standing in Missouri. 



Don Pronto 2:05% has gained over 100 pounds in 
weight since his return to Los Angeles, and Will 
Durfee, his trainer, has reason to be proud of his im- 
proved appearance. 



More horses have their wind broken by being 
worked quickly and hard with their stomachs dis- 
tended with hay, grain and water than from all 
other causes combined. 



W. E. D. Stokes, proprietor of the Patchen Wilkes 
Stock Farm, Lexington, Ky., is steadily improving 
since his operation for an abscess on the kidneys 
and is able to sit up in his apartments. 



Billy Andrews is credited with having driven six 
horses to records of 2:05 or better — John R. Gentry, 
2:00%; Hamburg Belle, 2:01%; Soprano, 2:03%; 
Cherry Lass, 2:03%; Mascot, 2:04, and Tiverton, 
2:04%. 



A. B. Coxe, Paoli, Pa., has three world's record 
horses at Nawbeek Farm— Peter Thompson, 3-year- 
old gelding, 2:07%; Czarevna, fastest heat for a 3- 
year-old filly, 2:07%, and Muda Guy, fastest 3-year- 
cld filly over a half-mile track, 2:12%. 



Harold B. 2:12 is not by Kinney Rose 2:13%, but 
by Kinney Lou 2:07%. The bay four-year-old trot- 
ting colt Kinney H. 2:22, however, is by the first 
named. The lines were transposed in the Pacific 
Coast 2:30 list published in our Holiday Number. 



If any nominators in Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
Stake No. 11, for foals of 1911, who have kept their 
entries paid up to date, have lost their foals, they 
have a chance to sell their nominations. Notify Sec- 
retary F. W. Kelley to that effect as he has several 
applications for substitutions in this stake. 



Fred Chadbourne, at Pleasanton, has Aerolite 
2:07%, the grandly bred and remarkably fast son of 
Searchlight 2:03%, looking stronger and better than 
ever. This horse should be well patronized this sea- 
son for everything he sired has proven to have early 
and extreme speed, and all are dead game. 



At the matinee on Christmas Day at Los Angeles, 
a statistician figured that the little group of officials 
who presided represented something like $40,000,000. 
The Los Angeles Driving Club, to which these few 
belong, is reported to have more wealthy men on 
its roster than any other in the United States, and 
they arc all enthusiastic horsemen, too. 



Among the high-class brood mares in foal to Sid- 
ney Dillon that will be shipped to Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, this week are Corona H., by Cresson; Pilot 
Girl (dam of three trotters), by Pilot Medium; May- 
wood Gem, by Sterling McKinney, 2:06%; Lizette 
Dillon, by Sidney Dillon, and Aileen Dillon, by Sid- 
ney Dillon. 



It appears that the rumor that W. E. D. Stokes 
was to sell all his horses (with the exception of 
three) is another one of the creations of some wild- 
eyed, long-haired daily newspaper reporter. This 
'breed of disturbers" traces to "trouble" on both 
sides, a little inbred, as it were, and therefore not 
exactly accountable for all they write. 



Alexander's Bay Chief, sire of Steven's Bald Chief, 
the sire of the late L. J. Rose's great broodmare 
Minnehaha, was a bay stallion foaled in 1859, sired 
by Mambrino Chief 11, dam by Keokuk; second dam 
by Stamboul (Arabian). Bay Chief trotted a half 
in 1:08 and was killed by guerrillas during the Civil 
War. He sired the grandam of Onoqua (4) 2:08%. 



The breeding of Harry R. (1) p. 2:24% is as fol- 
lows: By Armond Lou 2:27%, a son of Kinney Lou 
2:07%; dam Lady Woolsey by Woolsey 5337 (a son 
of Electioneer 125, and Waxana by General Benton 
1755), second dam Sepsie by Imp. Crichton, thor- 
oughbred. He is a chestnut colt foaled in 1910 and 
was bred by Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet, Cal. 



The MacKenzie string, in charge of Havis James, 
which is wintering at Pleasanton, Cal., will finish 
its spring training at Libertyville, 111. The informa- 
tion comes from Dick McMahan's camp. Dick has 
leased the track for the coming year and may ex- 
tend his option to a ten-year term. Also there is 
some talk about a race meeting at Libertyville. — 
Horseman. 

Wm. Hendrickson, of Pleasanton, the gentleman 
who was thrown out of his buggy in a runaway two 
weeks ago, was not so seriously injured as reported. 
He is able to be around and supervise the training of 
his fine brown five-year-old gelding Tom Hendricks, 
a son of McKena and a mare by Owyhee 2:11. This 
is a very promising trotter and will be raced this 
year on the Pacific Coast Circuit. 



Capt. C. H. Williams, of Palo Alto, owns several 
very choice trotting stallions, broodmares, colts and 
fillies. Last Friday he visited Woodland, where he 
has three very promising daughters of Unimak 
(brother to Sterling McKinney 2:00%). He was de- 
lighted with their appearance, and as all have shown 
speed while being worked he will undoubtedly have 
them racing when the races begin this year. 



Chas. James received an addition to his string at 
Pleasanton last week. Jas. Dunne, of Donnelly, 
Dunne & Co., of Hollister, sent him the handsomest 
three-year-old gelding he has ever handled, he 
is called Dicto, and was sired by Dictatus Medium, 
out of Letter B. (dam of Cresto 2:12%). He is a 
free-legged pacer and, if there is anything in breed- 
ing, conformation and a perfectly natural gait, Dicto 
should prove a money winner this season. 



Dr. T. H. Brents, of Walla Walla, is the owner of 
Magladi 2:07, by Del Norte 2:08; second dam, Lau- 
relia (dam of Helen Norte 2:09%) by Caution 
2:25%, (son of Electioneer and Barnes by Hamble- 
tonian 725): third dam, Buttercup, by Alwood 972, 
son of Almont 33. Last summer she dropped a beau- 
tiful black filly by Bon Voyage 2:08 at San Jose that 
is just being handled. It trots, but eventually will 
pace, and from its breeding it should be extremely 
fast. 



S. S. Bailey, of Pleasanton, is more than pleased 
with the reports he receives from Oregon regard- 
ing the progeny of his handsome stallion Tidal Wave 
2:06%. The owners say that all out of t-otting 
mares trot fast, and those from pacers pace fast, and 
their gaits are not interchangeable. Tidal Wave is 
beautifully bred, being by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, 
out of My Miracle (sister to Coney 2:02, etc.), by 
McKinney 2:11%, and is one of the surest foal get- 
ters in California. 



It is essential that the sire and dam should them- 
selves possess really great, qualities, should have 
something of their own to transmit to their offspring 
and not be entirely dependent on the merits of some 
remote antecedent. Breeders cf the light harness 
horse are gradually recognizing the importance of 
this principle of heredity and as a consequence the 
great young trotters who are stake winners are 
patronized as soon as they are retired to the stud 
to the exclusion of older horses, even though the 
latter have established reputations. 



The Sheepshead Bay racetrack, New York, which 
was placed on the market two months ago, is not to 
be cut up into building lots after all. It has been pur- 
chased, according to announcement today, by a syn- 
dicate which will transform it into an immense am- 
phitheatre, where outdoor sports of all kinds may 
take place. The proposed changes include the con- 
struction of a two mile automobile track, golf links, 
archery and tennis courts, several baseball diamonds, 
polo fields, a steeplechase course and artificial canals 
providing a course for motor boat racing. 



We respectfully call the attention of racing secre- 
taries and managers to the fact that in Russia one 
of the coldest countries on the globe and one having 
the longest winters, that racing begins long before 
it does in this country and that the same is true 
wherever the sport flourishes on the continent of 
Europe. Abroad the racing public and the man- 
agers of the sport fix the time it begins, in this 
country, the trainers are the arbiters, and that they 
are qualified to control so absolutely one of the 
most fascinating sports in existence, seems extremely 
doubtful. 



Chas. De Ryder has a trio of trotting babies (none 
is older than ten months) at Pleasanton, and every- 
one who sees these little things hitched to sulkies 
claims there never were such pure trotters of their 
age shown at this historic track. It is a question 
which is the best. They are owned by P. H. Smith, 
of Los Angeles. One is Zomarine S., a filly by Zom- 
bro 2:11, out of Katharine 2:19, by Diablo 2:09%, 
another is a filly by El Volante 2:13% (son of Zom- 
bro 2:11 and Mamie Elizabeth 2:20, dam of Amo K. 
2:20%, by Red Regent) out of Rosemary by Ray- 
mon 2:27% (son of Simmons 2:28), and the other 
is a colt by El Volante 2:13%, out of Seville S., by 
Strath way 2:19, second dam Simmone, by Simmons 
2:28; third dam Mi Lady (dam of Ackerland 2:13%, 
and Oreno 2:27%), by Baron Wilkes 2:18; fourth 
dam Lady Gay, by Mambrino Patchen, etc. These 
are just what one would expect to find from such 
rich breeding, and De Ryder says he never, In all 
his experience, saw such promising youngsters. 



McKinney still heads the list of sires of extreme 
speed, having 13 trotters and 10 pacers in 2:10 or 
better. Peter the Great has 12 trotters and only 1 
pacer in the "select circle." Gambetta Wilkes has 3 
trotters and 16 pacers, while Direct, "the little black 
rascal," has 4 trotters and 11 pacers. Nutwood leads 
all sires of speed-producing daughters, having sired 
the dams of 11 trotters and 9 pacers; Strathmore 
comes next with 6 trotters and 12 pacers, and Al- 
cantara is third, with 4 trotters and 14 pacers in the 
2:10 list. 



A free-legged pacer with a pronounced earning 
capacity is practically of equal value with a trotter 
of like class. This fact has been demonstrated a 
number of times within a very few years. All of 
which brings us around to the point that since the 
pacing horse has been termed a by-product of the 
trotting horse industry, why worry about the future? 
If a by-product has an equal value with the main 
thing produced, there is ample ground for encourage- 
ment and breeders can look to the future with satis- 
faction. 



There are 128 active members of the Los Angeles 
Driving Club and at the last general meeting thirty 
more applications for membership were sent to the 
efficient secretary, E. J. Delorey. Following is a list 
of the officers and directors: Officers — L. J. Chris- 
topher, president; Clarence Berry, vice-president; 
E. Deffenbach, treasurer; E. J. Delorey, secretary; 
Frederick J. Terrlll, assistant secretary. Directors 
—J. W Nickerson, C. C. Colyear, C. A. Canfield, C. 
G. Willis, R. B. Moorehead, Dr. Wm. Dodge, Wil- 
liam, A. Clarke, Jr. Speed Committee — Dr. Wm. 
Dodge, J. W. Nickerson, C. J. Berrv, R. B. Moore- 
head, Chr. Willis. 



The well-known breeder, M. T. Grattan, of Pres- 
ton, Minn., in a recent letter in regard to working his 
trotting bred mares on the farm, adds: "Many 
farmers in this section appreciate the value of trot- 
ting blood for farm work, and have for years back. 
The late Charles A. DeGraff bred splendid individuals 
from Percheron mares and a trotting stallion; they 
are fine workers, good roadsters and ready sellers. 
The progenies of the hackney and coachers have, 
with rare exceptions, proved worthless for any prac- 
tical purposes, as well as unsaleable. The hackney, 
especially, lacks constitution and staying power, none 
of them liking a day's work, cutting up, washy and 
stringy before noon. The trotting horse sticks to 
it all day, does the errand of the evening and goe3 
to church Sunday." 



"Lou Rass," which campaigned through the north- 
west and won at a number of places, has been identi- 
fied as the trotting gelding Dr. Frazee 2:11%, bred 
by Jas. W. Rea, of San Jose, and was sired by his 
horse Iran Alto 2:12%. Dr. Frazee, in charge of 
Sam Squires, of La Grange, 111., raced through the 
Illinois Valley Circuit several seasons ago. He also 
started the Doctor at Libertyville against Sonoma 
Girl 2:04%, and Highball 2:03%, and beat 2:10 in 
pretty nearly every heat. Judge McCreary and Sam 
Squires identified the Doctor at Grand Island, Neb. 
As a result Tom Bradstreet and T. R. Arbuckle of 
Grand Island, Neb., and "Lou Rass" are suspended 
until further identification is furnished of the horse 
entered or driven by them during the year 1911; also 
until the winnings of said horse under the name of 
"Lou Rass" during the year 1911 be returned for 
redistribution. 



Col. J. C. Kirlcpatrick, manager of the Palace and 
Fairmont Hotels, San Francisco, is one of the best 
horsemen and amateur drivers on the Pacific Coast. 
He has a beautiful home adjacent to the Pleasanton 
race track where he always keeps a few young 
trotters to handle. He is the owner of Charley D. 
2:06%, by McKinney 2:11%, one of the handsomest 
as well as fastest sons of this great sire, and re- 
cently he has been jogging a few by this pacer that 
are very promising. He has a two-year-old colt out 
of Mountain Maid (dam of Kenneth C. 2:13% and 
Ben Hur 2:17%), by Cresco; and another out of 
May T. 2:15 by Monterey 2:09%, that are doing re- 
markably well. Then he has another big Charley D. 
weanling filly out of a mare by Silver Bow 2:16, and 
a black weanling colt by Bon Voyage 2:08, out of 
Flewy Flewy (dam of Charley D. 2:06%) by Memo, 
son of Sidney 2:19%. 



A man who could not be regarded very deeply 
versed in horse history w r ould consider a stallion at 
eleven or twelve years of age, that has been raced 
to a good trotting record and that has demon- 
strated that he is a sure foal getter and sires speed, 
as tco well up in years to command the top price 
which his breeding and proven capabilities showed 
him to be worth. George Wilkes 2:22 was a for- 
tune to put in the stud and a great success, and he 
started his career at seventeen years of age. No 
stallion developed in speed and raced enough to 
reveal his campaigning quality, could be tested as a 
sire in addition, under eleven, or twelve, and he is 
only then at the beginning of his best years for the 
stud, or paying 'stallion value. Every year from 
that up to anywhere from twenty to thirty or older 
he should earn twice over the price of untested, 
unmarked, young studs. It is worth good hard dol- 
lars to breed, raise, and make a record stallion, and 
show men that he sires colts and good ones likewise, 
and a man not willing to pay a good round sum for 
such a one if not over fifteen or eighteen years old, 
does not deserve one, and would be too close and 
dense in understanding to handle one if it come into 
his possession. — Exchange. 



Saturday, January 13, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



The attention of every stallion and broodmare is 
called to the fact that our "Breeders' Number," to be 
issued March 2d, will be the best advertising medium 
to exploit the merits of their horses ever published. 



Last week, Frank Turner, of Santa Rosa, sold two 
fillies by Guy Dillon 2:23, to some Alameda buyers 
through J. Groom. They are two years old, one is 
out of Adioo, by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, and the other is 
out of Center Eye, by McKinney 2:11%. 



Now is the time to order from Studebakers, Fre- 
mont and Mission streets, San Francisco, one of 
their Toomey track carts for $70, a Frazier sulky for 
$80, a pneumatic road cart for $60, or a splendid 
Toomey sulky for $80, the best made; these prices 
cannot be beat. 



Harry Brown, the well-known horseman of San 
Jose, recently sold his Bon McKinney colt, dam Helen 
Keyes by Sidney Dillon, to Ted Hayes. Competent 
judges claim he is one of the handsomest colts as 
well as the fastest of his age in California. 



The body of the late John J. Sangster, who died 
in the County Hospital at Woodland last Monday, 
is being held while an effort is made to locate a 
brother believed to live in Los Angeles. Deceased 
came to Woodland from Chico with a string of 
horses, intending to spend the winter at the race 
track. His affliction was pleuro-pneumonia, and he 
was sick but two days. He was about 55 years of 
age. * 

With one kick of its hind leg a horse in Oregon 
City, Ore., committed three murders and a suicide. 
Friends of Robert Norris, a rancher, have found his 
dead body in a corner of his barn where it had been 
hurled, while in the various stalls were found the 
dead bodies of two cows and the horse. Norris had 
been missing for several weeks. Investigation 
showed that Norris in passing the stall, had been 
kicked in the head and instantly killed. Then the 
murderer and two cows, all securely tied, had 
starved to death. 



El Rio Rey, one of the greatest race horses in 
the history of the turf, died on Monday on the 
stock farm of the late Theodore Winters, a few 
miles south of Reno, at the advanced age of 24 
years. El Rio Rey was the only Western horse 
that ever won the Eclipse Stakes at Sheepshead 
±say. He acquired this honor in 1889 and won a 
purse ot $23,750. The noted Dwyer Brothers of 
New York offered Winters $60,000 lor the animal, 
but the offer was refused. El Rio Rey was sired 
by Norfolk, by Lexington. Marion, a famous brood 
mare, brought to California by the late Jos. Cairn 
Simpson, was the dam. 



Expedition 2:15%, generally credited as the fore- 
most speed siring son of Electioneer 125, and now 
premier at Hopper Farm, should be credited with 
another new standard record trotter for 1911 that 
has not been credited in previous unofficial tables 
ano lists of new performers. This is the three-year- 
old bay colt Sayola 48772, owned at Hopper Farm, 
that was given a precautionary record of 2:26% at 
the late Galesburg, 111., breeders' meeting, though be 
could trot well below 2:20. This youngster is an 
extraordinarily well bred one, being out of Opalia, 
by Allerton 2:09%; next dam the great brood mare 
Gul Bahur, by Guy Wilkes 2:15%; third dam the 
great brood mare Alicia Nutwood, by Nutwood 
2:3 8%; next the celebrated Alicia, by George Wilkes, 
and tne filth the famous Alma Mater. 

o 

NAPA STOCK FARM THOROUGHBREDS. 



There is stopping in this city at present Mr. Matt 
Byrnes, one of the greatest horsemen in America, 
who has been closely identified with the thorough- 
bred interests ever since he rode Kingfisher lor Aug- 
ust Belmont in 1869. He was with Pierre Loril- 
lard in his palmy days. Phil and Michael Dwyer, 
who owned Pontiac, Dewdrop, Hanover, Tremont and 
others, and then went with J. B. Haggin and took a 
number of his horses east from Sacramento and 
raced them. He had Fitz James, Firenzi, the great- 
est race mare ever foaled in America, Ben Ali, 
Hidalgo, Guarantee, Mercury, Santa Rita and a 
number of others in this consignment. Then he had 
Salvator, trained him and raced him in all his races, 
and Fresno, who was equally as good a two-year-old 
as Salvator, and all the other great horses Mr. Hag- 
gin had up to the time he quit racing. Then 
Mr. Byrne was appointed head trainer for Marcus 
Daly and handled all of this great stud, including 
the famous stake winner, Montana. He bought for 
this wealthy breeder the yearlings, Tammany and 
Senator Grady, the latter was the best two-year- 
old of his year. He beat all comers. Besides these, 
Mr. Byrnes selected and purchased all the thorough- 
breds for Mr. Daly's big farm in Bitter Root Valley. 
Mr. Byrne won the Suburban with the three differ- 
ent owners he worked for: Pierre Lorillard's Pontiac 
his first start, J. B. Haggin's Salvator, and Marcus 
Daly's Montana, and the renewal of the Suburban 
with Ben Ali three days after he had started in the 
Suburban. 

This veteran trainer won the three-mile record 
with Drake Carter and is the trainer of more win- 
ners of classic races than any man in America. He 
has just returned from the Argentine Republic, 
where for four years he represented J. B. Haggin 
and disposed of all of his thoroughbreds, about 400 
mares and colts and 25 stallions. He speaks most 
highly of the Argentine Republic as a racing point. 



No place in the world equals it. The purses range 
irom $1750 to $25,000 and the game is under the 
protection of the government. All the betting is 
carried on under the Pari-Alutuel system. The race 
tracks and appointments are magnificent and racing 
is carried on the year round. 

Last week Mr. Byrne visited the Napa Stock Farm 
through the courtesy of the owner, Mr. A. B. 
Spreckels, and was highly pleased with the place and 
delighted to see so many fine-looking classy two- 
year-olds. They are in excellent shape and ready 
to be put into active training. Among these iifteen 
youngsters there are some tnat cannot be surpassed 
on any stock tarm in America tor breeding and 
looks. Mr. Byrnes says that the sire Voorhees is 
destined to be one of the greatest, his bloodlines 
cannot be excelled and as an individual he is one 
of the finest. His colts and fillies strongly resem- 
bled. Mr. Spreckels also has one of the best young 
stallions Mr. Byrnes has ever seen in this or any 
other country, called Big Chief, by Pontiac. Soli- 
taire II looks well and so does Dr. Lecco. Both 
these have achieved excellent reputations as sires. 
There are twenty-odd yearlings, colts and fillies, 
here, which reflect great credit on the judgment of 
their owner as a breeder and show that they have 
had every care. The mares look extremely well, 
and have been selected with excellent judgment. 

The residence is a magnificent one, with flowers, 
lawns and plants surrounding it, making it a perfect 
home. No money was spared in its building or ap- 
pointments. The view from the front of this resi- 
dence cannot be surpassed. All the buildings are 
neat and kept in perfect order. The stallion barn 
is as good as any Mr. Byrnes has seen in America, 
Europe or the Argentine. He says that if racing 
ever resumes its place in America there will be great 
difficulty to get good horses, and Mr. Spreckels, by 
his gameness in keeping up his interest in it, 
deserves great credit in being able to supply some, 
as does Wm. O'B. Macdonough, who has a small 
but select stud at Menlo Park. 

FOWLER PREPARING FOR FAIR. 



The Fresno County Fair Association does not in- 
tend to wait until the middle of the summer before 
making active preparations for the fair in the fall, as 
has been the case in the past, and already plans are 
being formulated for the district fair, which is to be 
held in this city, probably the first week in October, 
says Fresno Republican. 

Not only are plans being made, but it developed 
yesterday at a meeting of the board of directors of 
the association that much interest in the fair is 
being taken by outside communities. 

In Fowler there is a strong desire to capture all 
the agricultural prizes at the fair and already a num- 
ber of people there are beginning planting to secure 
exhibits. Announcement of the beginning of work 
for the fair in Fowler, was made by Mrs. A B. Arm- 
strong, the member of the board of directors from 
that district. 

C. H. Edwards, the director from Merced, reported 
that a great deal of interest is being taken in the 
coming district fair up there and that Merced will 
come to the fair with a big exhibit of all kinds of 
products. In every district, the directors have been 
authorized to appoint assistants to gather exhibits 
and in several places these assistants have already 
been appointed and are making arrangements for 
securing first class exhibits. 

In order to stimulate the agricultural end of the 
fair, the directors recently decided to increase the 
agricultural premiums so as to make it worth while 
for exhibitors. Thin will be one of the big changes 
in the 1912 premium book. The scarcity of agri- 
cultural exhibits last fall, led to an effort to stimu- 
late interest in this department and strengthen it. 

A meeting of the secretaries of the different fair 
associations from Vancouver, B. C, to Phoenix, Ariz., 
will be held at the Palace Hotel on January 18, when 
a Coast Fair circuit will be organized and dates for 
the different fairs made. The general plan is to 
have the circuit of fairs open in Vancouver, early in 
the summer and close at Phoenix, late in the fall. 
It is not expected that the date of the Fresno fair 
will be changed, although nothing definite will be 
known until after the meeting. 

In addition to the secretary, C. G. Eberhart, a num- 
ber of the other directors of the Fresno Fair Asso- 
ciation are planning to attend the San Francisco 
meeting. 

The directors yesterday decided that the 1912 
fair will be different from any other fair ever held 
in Fresno in that there will be just as big enter- 
tainments at night as there will be in the daytime. 
In the past, the fair association has generally had 
entertainments but two nights in the week, but this 
year there will be elaborate entertainments every 
night while the fair is open. It is believed that the 
increased attendance will offset the additional ex- 
penditure necessary for such an undertaking. 

In order to facilitate the transaction of business 
this year, an executive committee has been chosen 
to act with the president and secretary in outlining 
plans for the fair. This committee will meet sev- 
eral times a month for the transaction of business, 
while the general board of directors will meet but 
once a month. The members of the executive com- 
mittee are J. E. Dickinson, C. G. Eberhart, L. H. 
Storgaard, of Kerman; Mrs. A. B. Armstrong, of 
Fowler; A. S. Kellogg, C, I. Pulliam and George L. 
Warlow. 

Those present at the meeting yesterday were J. E. 
Dickinson, C. G. Eberhart, George L. Warlow, H. E. 
Vogel, Al McNeil, Mrs. A. B. Armstrong, of Fowler; 
L. H. Storgaard, of Kerman, and C. H. Edwards, of 
Merced. 



OIL PAINTING OF GOLDSMITH MAID. 



Last week the Hemet Stock Farm, of which Budd 
Dobie, tne world s greatest reiusmau, is general man 
ager, received a large oil painting ot tne uniting 
laaie Uuiusiuith maid, whicu is a most exceiiem. 
iiKeuess of mat wonueriul race mare, who was tuny 
>ears ahead ot her time. the painting snows me 
superb oeauty oi the animal anu urings out in per- 
tect detail tne physical perfection wmch made tuis 
trotter tne greatest of ner time, and wau is tnougnt 
ny many to be the greatest oi ail time. Starting 
tne largest part oi her racing achievements aiter she 
was ten years old and Keeping them up until she 
was twenty-one years, empnasizes more fully what 
a wonuer she was, says iieniet News. 

Back in a little New Jersey namiet where the 
usual country store was located, many oi tne tanner 
boys used to run horses nights on tne high roads 
nearby, and in that community lived a larmer who 
owneu an exceptionally well bred liily that he was 
unabie to breaK. This one on several occasions 
kicked to pieces the breaking carts and harness, and 
acted in such an ungovernable manner that the 
owner gave up all hope of ever teaching her to drive. 
So the boys took this filly out of the held at night 
and raced with her on the country cross-roads ot the 
hamlet, beating every thing that was brought out. 
About this time she was purchased by a horse trader, 
who in time sold her to a man named Alden Gold- 
smith, whose groom was a horseman, and who 
succeeded in teaching the mare to drive. Immedi- 
ately she began to show speed, winning a few coun- 
try races and in the spring she was turned over to 
Budd Doble, who the next year gave her a trotting 
mark below thirty at the age of ten years, and 
bought her for $20,000. The next year he sold her 
lor $35,000 with a proviso that $5000 more should be 
paid when she beat the world's record. At the age 
of seventeen years she took her fastest record of 
2:14, having beaten the world's record of Dexter at 
iifteen years. At the age of nineteen she again 
equaled her own record and won the fastest six-heat 
race ever trotted up to that time. She was wintered 
that year in Chico, and the following year trotted 
within a half second of her record in 2: 14% at the 
age of twenty. During that season she was given 
exhibition miles only and was retired the following 
year sound and in excellent condition. At the age 
of twenty-two years she raised a colt at the Fashion 
Stock Farm, New York, and became so ugly to her 
caretakers that no one could go near her, so she 
was turned into a paddock with a high fence for 
fear someone would get inside the enclosure and be 
killed. The report of her viciousness traveled far 
and wide until it got to the ears of her old groom, 
Charlie Cochran, then eighty years old, who had 
slept in her stall for eleven years, and for whom the 
Maid had always shown great love, standing, it is 
said with her fore feet against his shoulders at night 
when he slept and allowing no one to disturb him. 
Hearing of the mare's conduct since having a foal, 
the old caretaker journeyed down to where she was 
kept and hid himself back of a bush and began call- 
ing her by her old stable name. It is said that the 
mare swung about in the field and came running 
to the fence, whinneighing and trying to locate the 
voice. The old groom then stepped out to meet her 
and such a display of animal affection was never 
witnessed by any one as the mare showed toward 
her old friend, and when he entered the field she did 
her best to call his attention to her foal, acting most 
proud of the little creature and wanting him to see 
it. People about wept at this show of affection. 
And when the old caretaker started to go the mare 
became crazy, even leaving her colt and trying to 
get out of the pasture to follow after him. 

Had Goldsmith Maid never been the great race 
mare that she was her demonstration of love and 
almost human intelligence branded her then as a 
noble creature. During her racing career she won 
in purses alone $364,200 with Mr. Doble. 

She died at the age of twenty-six, having raised 
several colts, and as the result of too good care 
from which she became too fat. Her old groom, 
Charlie Cochran died later at Palo Alto Farm at 
an old age, and, like the mare he loved, was one of 
the best in his line. 

The painting was made by the artist Van Zandt 
of Albany, New York, an old friend of Mr. Doble'B 
He is dead now, but his son, William I. Van Zandt, 
met Mr. Doble at Madison Square Garden during the 
sale last month and wished to present him with the 
painting, which is a rare work of art. 



STATE FUTURITY STAKE NO. 4. 



C. Allison Telfer, of the State Agricultural Society, 
Sacramento, has sent the following letter circular 
to horse owners: ; 

"Every nomination in the Pacific Breeders Fu- 
turity Stake No. 12, which closed December 1, 1911, 
should be nominated as well in the State Futurity 
Stake No. 4, $5000 guaranteed, to close February 1, 
1912. 

The entrance fee is small and the cost of training 
for two stakes Is no more than for one. By entering 
in this stake you have two chances of winning and 
your colt will be eligible for four races; two two- 
year-old and two three-year-old events. To win any 
one of them means big money for you and an in- 
creased value for the colt. The fact that the colt is 
entered in two big futurity stakes will make it worth 
more than as though it were entered In but one, or 
none at all. You can not afford not to enter." 
o- 

Can any of our readers send us the pedigree of 
Diablo H.? 



s 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 



J ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 1 

I CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeA ITT. | 



TRAP SHOOTING IN MONTANA. 

[By C. H. Smith] 

While I have been shooting at the itraps for the 
past twenty-six years, I never had any idea of writ- 
ing about this sport until asked to do so by the 
Butte Inter Mountain. I gave my consent reluct- 
antly, having in mind the old adage — to be a good 
shooter one must have a strong arm and a weak 
head. 

This sport is so common that nearly everyone in 
this neck of the woods has taken part in it or has 
at least been a spectator, so any description is 
quite unnecessary. I think that the Butte Rod and 
Gun Club is the oldest organization of this kind in 
Montana. This club was organized in the year 1882 
by J. M. Steward and others and included among 
its members quite a few prominent men of the eld 
pioneers. John Noyes, John Caplice, James Forbis, 
Frank Corbett, John D. Thomas, J. F. Beck, J. M. 
Steward and Henry Williams were on the roll of 
membership. All of the above have passed to the 
great beyond. 

The club became quite active about the year 1885, 
and has been in a prosperous way ever since. 

I can well remember the first territorial trap 
shooting tournament. It was held in Helena in Au- 
gust, 1886; the weather was awful hot — must have 
been 100 in the shade. 

Some of those present at that time are still in 
the game, viz: W. H. Young, John F. Cowan, T. M. 
Lowry, E. S. Faxson, Al Orton and myself. The 
grand event on this occasion was a team shoot for 
a silver cup, donated by the citizens of Helena. 
Three teams contested, one each from Helena, Boze- 
man and Butte. Butte made a good race, but fin- 
ished in third place. 

The Montana Sportsmen's Association was or- 
ganized in 1894, and has been holding tournaments 
yearly in the different towns in the State. These 
meets are looked forward to with considerable pleas- 
urable anticipation. It is there that we meet the 
old boys, generally accompanied by their better 
halves. These occasions are greatly enjoyed, not 
only for the sport furnished, but for the social fea- 
tures as well. It is getting to be mere of a re- 
union of the shooters and their families from year 
to year. Long may they continue. About twenty 
clubs go to make up the membership of the asso- 
ciation, and nearly every town in the State is rep- 
resented. When the State shoots are under way 
something is doing all the time. The lady members 
(we have some) help in the fun-making to a very 
considerable extent. At one of the State shoots held 
in Missoula many years ago a few of the girl vis- 
itors thought to go flower gathering; lilacs were ripe; 
lilacs were good enough for them. That evening 
they left the hotel in a bunch (they had spied the 
garden during the day) in quest of bouquets. They 
were soon at the grounds, surrounded, however, with 
a picket fence. This had no terrors for one of the 
girls, who volunteered to jump the fence. She scon 
had bunches of lilacs thrown to the others on the 
outside. About this time the owner came out of 
the house; something was doing; those on the cut- 
side ran to the hotel, but the poor girl in the yard, 
in trying to get over the fence, forgot about her 
skirts, and there she hung; the kind hearted owner 
came to her aid and set her free. In explaining 
to the other ladies the reason for her delay she said 
that after her release she was so humiliated she 
forgot to thank the man. This happened 15 years 
ago. I am not yet absolved from secrecy; so I am 
not giving any names. 

The biggest trap shooting events ever held in 
Montana were pulled off in Anaconda in 1908 and 
1909. These were the Western Boosters' Associa- 
tion tournaments, and each year the citizens of the 
little town added $3100 in cash prizes as well as 
medals and cups. There were present at those shoots 
the most prominent shooters of the United States 
and Canada and included both professionals and ama- 
teurs. The attendance was something over 175, and 
some of those traveled over 3000 miles to take part 
including Clarence A. Haight, of San Francisco, and 
other Coast sportsmen. It is evident from this that 
the sport must be very attractive. It is one of the 
squarest sports indulged in today. It is no strange 
thing to see judges and referees picked from the con- 
testants themselves, with not a thought but that 
they would get a perfectly honest and fair deal, and 
they do. 

The game is very fascinating; it trains the eye, the 
nerve, the mind and the muscles. Trap shooting 
may not make a field shot of you, but it teaches 
you how to handle a gun, and one who has had ex- 
perience at the traps will much sooner become pro- 
ficient in game shooting. 

The name of clay pigeon is still used here for 
flying targets. Years ago they were really made of 
clay, but they are now made of pitch and sand, 
hardened under great pressure. 

In 1884 while our club was holding a shoot on the 
grounds, located at that time about where the Paul 
Clark home now is; Fred Gilbert, one of our mem- 
bers, was at the score, and shooting poorly; he had 



missed 11 in succession, he hit the next target and 
turning around he said, 'At last I have broken the 
monotony." 

A boy spectator said to his father, whom he was 
with, "Papa, Mr. Gilbert calls them monotonies, I 
thought they were clay pigeons." 

I am so firmly impressed with this good, whole- 
some, manly sport, that I would advise those of you, 
who have boys, let them join a gun club, the teach- 
ing and training they will get will do them no end 
of good; it is there that they are taught how to 
handle a gun with safely to themselves and associates, 

We read every few days of accidents to boys who 
take guns and rifles with them into the hills, never 
having had any previous experience in handling fire- 
arms. Accidents of this kind would rarely happen 
had those same boys had their first lessons with 
some trap club. 

On the other hand, thousands of shooters are tak- 
ing part in tournaments most every day, all over this 
country, and it is not once in ten years we hear 
of an accident. This game is for every one, both 
women and men, young or old. 

Speaking in behalf of the boys, Ernest Klepetko, 
son of Frank Klepetko, formerly manager of the 
Anaconda Mining Company, broke 20 clay pigeons 
straight at a tournament held at Anaconda in 1903. 
At that time he was only 14 years old. 

For the ladies, Mrs. Add Topperwein finished 
tenth among all the trap shooters in the United 
States, and for the elderly ones, I give you as an 
example that old patriarch, Sandy Irvine of Great 
Falls. He has been shooting so many years that 
memory is lost, before he can get back to the be- 
ginning. Sandy broke 49 targets straight at Bil- 
lings in 1907, and might have been hitting them all 
yet, had not a certain young lady spectator blurted 
out, "Oh, isn't Sandy nice!" He overheard this and 
missed his fiftieth bird. 

You can see from these illustrations that you age 
or sex does not bar you from trap shooting. The 
favorable claims I have mentioned are not all of the 
good things that can be gotten out of trap shoot- 
ing. Two of my acquaintances, trap shooters, one 
considerable of a drinker and the other an invet- 
erate smoker, swore off their habits, thinking to 
steady their nerves, and it did improve their shoot- 
ing. 

At a match shoot for the State live bird medal, 
back in 1893, only 17 years ago (you know that the 
years that are gone don't count), one of the con- 
testants took quite a few bracers out of a black 
bottle. Along about the middle of the match he 
missed. Turning to his brother, he said, "Jim, give 
me a drink." He shot and missed again, took an- 
other drink and missed the third shot. Dr. Black- 
burn, who was present as a spectator, made this re- 
mark, "That was the shortest and most convinc- 
ing temperance lecture I ever heard." So you see 
trap shooting even teaches temperance. 

There is one more subject in connection with 
trap shooting I would like to touch upon, Fraternity. 
You will wonder where that enters into the shoot- 
ing game, but it does exist and that, too, in a very 
marked degree. 

When you visit a strange town, it is not a brother 
of this or that lodge you lock up. You first hunt up 
the shooters, and every town has some, mostly good 
fellows. I have seen bankers, bartenders, merchants 
and miners all shooting in the same squad, not one 
of them giving a thought as to his social position, in- 
>ent only on making a god score. "Good scores make 
all men kin." 

o 

SHOTGUN BREECH FASTENINGS. 



American manufacturers of shotguns make it their 
practice to adopt modifications of the Westley 
Richards method of top fastening for securing the 
barrels of their double guns, it is claimed by a writer 
in the Country Gentleman. English makers in 
some cases use both top and bottom fastenings, 
while in others they rely only on the Purdey snap 
bolts. It is as exceptional for an English gun- 
maker to use top fastenings alone as it is for an 
American gun manufacturer to use anything else. 

Three ways of bolting barrels are in common use, 
and all seem to serve their purpose adequately. To 
understand why this is so a glance at the process 
of development is advisable. When first breech- 
loaders with drrp-down barrels came into use they 
were locked by means of a grip operating on the 
"lump" beneath the barrels. The first notable 
improvement was the "double grip," a kind of screw, 
operating on both the lumps and very securely 
binding down the barrels on the action body. Then 
Messrs. James Purdey & Sons introduced their dou- 
ble snap bolt. This is a bolt operating on both 
lumps, bevelled like the latch of a door, so that the 
gun can be closed without turning the handle, but 
cannot be opened until the lever is moved. That 
represents the snap fastening, operating below the 
barrels, which is now in general use. Meanwhile 
it had been observed that a tendency existed for 
guns to open slightly at the top during discharge. 
To counteract that, Messrs. Westley Richards & Co. 
designed and produced the first top fastening. The 



form it took was the well-known doll's head. The 
actual invention dealt with the principle, and the 
doll's head was enly one of the ways — the way 
thought by the makers to be the best — of carrying 
it into effect. The doll's head, mortised into the 
solid metal of the breech, prevented gaping, and, 
being secured by a bolt, it also formed an effective 
fastening. Later came the Greener and Clabrough 
cross belts, securing the extension, the Webley screw 
grip, and many other forms, all serving the same 
purpose. English makers at one time went in for 
multitudes of bolts and grips and snaps, but experi- 
ence showed that these were not necessary. Ameri- 
can makers, with guns characterised by great refine- 
ment of workmanship, as the Parker Bros, or L. C. 
Smith high grade guns beautifully illustrate, have 
shown that Westley Richards in his original concep- 
tion was right, and that one good top fastening, if 
properly fitted, suffices to keep the gun tightly 
closed. English makers, with guns of the highest 
grade, a term here implying the closest and most 
perfect fitting, have shown that Purdey also was 
right, and that under snap bolts need no re-enforce- 
ment. Makers who utilize both methods in combi- 
nation rely upon one to supplement the other, and 
in so doing are justified by the merits alike of the 
top and bottom fastening. 

It seems a very legitimate point for inquiry why, 
as American makers insist, and American writers 
sometimes insist rather aggressively, that one Eng- 
lish system is mechanically better than the other, 
so many English makers persist in using the under 
snap. Their guns sometimes are used more con- 
tinuously than any guns can be used elsewhere, but 
they remain tight and sound year after year. The 
strains upon the fastenings of a breechloading gun 
during firing are of a complex nature. The inquiry 
suggested may be simplified by disregarding these 
complexities. Accentuation of normal pressures 
may reach a point where metal breaks. It is enough 
for the present purpose to assume that the object 
of the fastenings is fulfilled by keeping the barrels 
tightly closed during the firing of cartridges. Every 
double gun is secured on the action body by the 
lump at the forward end hooking over the rounded 
front of the hollow into which the lump sinks. Prac- 
tically this is a pivot pin passing through a loop 
beneath the barrels, the fore-end, when on, com- 
pleting the inner side of the loop. Close the bar- 
rels, and the back support is seen to be the standing 
breech, against the face of which the ends of the 
barrels are supported before ever they are fastened 
at all. Upward and downward motion is the only 
motion the fastenings are intended to prevent. 
Downward movement of the barrels behind the pivot 
pin is impossible, because the flats of the barrels 
lie on the corresponding surface of the action body. 
It. is, therefore, upward motion, the tilting up of the 
breech ends and the tilting down of the muzzle, that 
has to be prevented. This obviously can be accom- 
plished by fastening the barrels underneath or by 
fastening them on the top. Either way serves, or 
both ways combined. 

The barrels of a gun might be regarded as a 
pivoted lever, with one arm shcrt and the other 
arm long. Playing at see-saw, it may be observed 
that a small child on the extreme end of a plank will 
overbalance a larger child sitting further away from 
the opposite end. To stop the see-saw is easy 
enough if either end be held, but to stop it by hold- 
ing near the center is a more difficult matter. The 
top fastening of a gun sits above and right at the 
end of the short arm of the lever which represents 
the gun barrel. It is, therefore, in the best posi- 
tion for resisting any upward motion. It might at 
this point be objected that the movement of the 
barrel under the stress of explosion would not 
necessarily be upwards! Quite so; but movement 
in other directions is, or should be, already guarded 
against. The bottom fastenings hang on below, and 
they are necessarily nearer to the pivct on which 
tho see-saw turns. 

At this joint, which represents the pivot; at the 
action face, where the barrels meet the standing 
breech, and in the fastenings themselves there must 
necessarily be a certain amount of toleration allowed. 
Without it the gun would not o]>en. By perfect 
fitting, easy operation is combined with an adjust- 
ment of surfaces so nice that when the gun is closed 
and the bolts have snapped home the barrels are 
incapable of motion in which the action body does 
not participate. It is a thing not wholly unheard 
lor a gun to break across at the angle where the 
breech face rises from the flats of the action body. 
By strengthening the body at this point the tendency 
has been overcome. A top fastening, provided it be 
tight enough — this is not a question of hair's 
breadths, for a hair's breadth would put the barrels 
"off the face"— lessens this strain. The purpose of 
the actual fastening, whatever form it may take, is 
to hold the barrels down on the body and up against 
the action face. These are the surfaces the bar- 
rels part from when the gun is opened. Forty years 
ago it was shown that either underbolts or top con- 
nections would serve the purpose equally well, both 
being more than adequate to resist the strains 
brought upon in firing sporting charges. 

o 

Coyote Pests.— John C. Hayes, federal inspector 
in charge of the campaign for the extermination of 
ground squirrels, has received complaints from 
ranchers, who say that the coyotes, deprived of the 
squirrels as an article of diet, are raiding the chicken 
coops and poultry yards. They ask to have a bounty 
offered by the county for coyote scalps, and Hayes 
may lay the proposition before the board of super- 
visors of different counties. 



Saturday, January 13, 1915.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



i 



HOW TO BROWN GUN BARRELS. 

The browning of gun barrels accomplishes a three- 
fold purpose — first: It subdues the brightness of the 
metal to increase the facility with which the hunter 
may hide from the eyes of game. Second: It brings 
out the fibres of the metal, adding a touch of fin- 
ished beauty to the arm, at the same time bringing 
plainly to view any flaws that may lie hidden be- 
neath the polish. And lastly, to a certain extent, 
browning delays the eating power of rust. The pro- 
cesses for browning are varied and the recipes for 
browning compositions are even more varied. 

The browning should never be done without first 
seeing that all the vents in the barrel are thoroughly 
stopped up with wooden pegs or wax. The holes 
in the breech and muzzle must also be stopped, and 
it has been found that wooden rods used for this 
purpose not only prevent the passage of the brown- 
ing fluid to the interior of the barrel, but that they 
also provide a most convenient pair of handles with 
which to manipulate the barrel during the applica- 
tion of the fluid. The browning process may then 
be commenced, and with, care in the work satisfac- 
tory results may be uniformly expected. 

The process is as simple as it is useful, and it 
may be accomplished by any gunsmith. Three steps 
only are necessary. First the producing of a very 
thin coat of rust or oxide over the exterior of the 
barrel, the working of a gloss to the surface of this 
firm by the rubbing on of wax, and finally the cover- 
ing of the glossed surface with a protecting coat of 
some kind of varnish. 

Before the fluid destined to produce the film of 
rust is applied the barrel must be thoroughly filed 
and polished bright, and rubbed with lime in order 
that all greasy substance may be removed. Some- 
times wet lime is used, or lime water, for this pur- 
pose. After the wet lime wash, however, the barrel 
should be dried in powdered lime. Then the solu- 
tion may be applied, with a rag or sponge, preferably 
the latter, when the barrel is ready for a drying 
process of from 12 to 24 hours, according to the 
variety of fluid used. When the work is dry enough 
for the next process the application of a card, or 
steel brush, will cause the rust to fly off easily, while 
the rust will cling to the metal and leave a streaky 
appearance if the barrel is not sufficiently dry. This 
wetting or carding should be repeated until the metal 
has assumed the desired color. Then a washing 
in clean water and a thorough drying will leave the 
barrel ready for the finishing processes, the rubbing 
with wax and the coating with shellac varnish or 
simple varnish. 

Among some of the solutions which are used in the 
production of the coat of browning are the following: 
Enclose the barrel in a chamber, subjecting it to the 
vapor of muriatic acid. Moistening the surface with 
diluted muriatic or nitric acid or moistening it with 
chloride of antimony sometimes called "bronzing" 
or "browning" salt is also oommon. In using the 
last named substance the process is quickened by 
the rubbing on afterward of a little aquafortis. The 
browning salt must be used mixed half and half 
with olive oil. This mixture is rubbed over the bar- 
ren which is slightly heated and then exposed in the 
air until the proper color has been obtained. 

Three formulas are recognized as good for mak- 
ing the varnish for browned gun barrels. The first is 
as follows: Dissolve ten parts of clear grains of mas- 
tic, five parts of camphor, fifteen grains of sandaric 
and five parts of elemi, in sufficient alcohol to effect 
the solution. Then apply the varnish without heat. 
This preparation not only protects the barrels from 
rust, but it also preserves the metallic lustre from 
even being dimmed by exposure to dampness. Sec- 
ond: Form a solution of one ounce of gum shellac, 
one ounce of gum sandarac, Venice turpentine, one 
drachm, and one gallon of 98' per cent alcohol. Third: 
A solution of one-quarter ounce of dragon's blood, 
one ounce of shellac and one quart of alcohol. In 
this varnish a less degree of color will be obtained 
by the use of a little less dragon's blood. 

Of the many ways to finish gun barrels after 
browning, possibly that most commonly in use by 
gunsmiths is the following: Warm the barrerls and 
then rub them while almost hot, with a flannel cloth. 
Then finish with a little bee's wax and turpentine. 
Some workmen polish the barrel for the finishing 
touches with a steel burnisher, or rub in white bee's 
wax. Still others use a thin wash of shellac varnish, 
carefully placed by means of a camel's hair brush. 

Some good gunsmiths finish off with a solution of 
two ounces of shellac and three drachms of dragon's 
blood, dissolved in two quarts of first class alcohol. 

The removal of old browning is an easy matter. 
After plugging the browned parts, immerse the bar- 
rel for an hour in strong lye, or hot lime water. 
Then wipe the barrel and place it in vinegar in 
a wooden trough for an hour or less. The browning 
may t hen he easily wiped off with a rag. 

o 

State Game Association. — Twelve hundred names 
are now on the rolls of the Fish and Game Pro- 
tective Association, the organization which State 
Fish and Game Commissioner Frank Newbert started. 
New membership cards are coming in by the score. 

From the office of the Commission at the State 
capitol last week it was announced that the members 
include men from almost every walk of life. There 
are sportsmen interested in fishing and hunting, 
county and city officials, farmers, lumbermen, min- 
ers and many others. 



NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION NOTES. 



Arrangements for the Western and Eastern Inter- 
club Indoor Rifle Shooting League for the season 
of 1912 have been completed. In the Western League 
there will be twelve teams and the matches began 
the week ending December 23. In the Eastern 
League there will be only ten teams and the matches 
began the week ending December 30. 

The result of the vote of the clubs competing on 
the question of sights resulted in a majority of the 
clubs voting for no change, consequently, the rule 
governing sights will remain the same as last year, 
i.e., any sight in front of the firing pin not contain- 
ing glass. There were seventeen clubs that voted on 
the proposition, of which thirteen voted for no 
change, two for telescopes and two for sights not 
containing glass mounted anywhere on the ri lie. 

It is probable that some of those that voted for 
no change would have voted otherwise if there had 
been more time in which to change the rifles before 
the matches began, and two clubs would have vith- 
drawn from the matches entirely if any change bad 
been made, thus breaking up the schedule. 

Owing to the absence of President Taft from 
Washington ever since last spring and his trip 
through the West, the usual letters of congratula- 
tion sent by the President to the winner of the In- 
dividual Military Championship of the Unite 1 States 
and the President's Match, have been somewhat de- 
layed. Copies of the letters which have been sent 
to the winners have just been received. They are as 
follows: 

To Sergeant King, the winner of the Military 
Championship, the President writes: 

"My Dear Sergeant King: — I heartily congraulate 
you on your victory in winning the individual Mili- 
tary Championship Match for this year. It is a great 
victory to win such a contest in competition with so 
many other contestants of high skill and merit. To 
win it was necessary for you to possess extraordi- 
nary skill in the use of the rifle and I am glad that 
you showed the requisite qualifications to attain this 
honor. 

Skill in the use of the rifle is absolutely necessary 
to the national guardsman, and he should attain such 
skill in times of peace, for when war is declared 
the soldier is called to the front he may not have 
time to acquire the skill in the use of the rifle 
which a really good soldier should possess. 
Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) WM. H. TAFT. 

Sergeant Charles M. King, Company I, 53d Infan- 
try, I. N. G., Waukin, la." 

To Captain Eddy, the winner of th? President's 
Match, the President was specially happy in his 
felicitations and dwelt on the pride he felt on hav- 
ing the match won by an Ohioan, his native State. 

"My Dear Captain Eddy: — I take this opportunity 
of congratulating you most heartily upj l your win- 
ning the President's Match of 1911. To win such 
a match in competition with so many others of great 
skill in rifle shooting is indeed a high houni ciid dis- 
llbys a high order of merit in the use ot the ride. 
I am glad that you have shown yourself possessed of 
the qualifications necessary to win such a contest, it 
should be a source of pride to the National Guard 
that they were successful in winning both the Mili- 
tary Match and the President's Match and it is par- 
ticularly pleasing to me to note that the latter was 
won by a member of the Guard from my own State. 
Sincerely yours, 

WM. H. TAFT. 

Captain E. W. Eddy, Eighth Infantry, O. N. G., 
Shreve, Ohio." 

Literature covering the new indoor qualifications 
of the Association is now being mailed out and the 
watch fobs will be ready for distribution the first of 
the year. 

o 

LIGHT TACKLE PRIZE WINNERS. 



The winners of prizes awarded by the Monterey 
Bay and San Francisco Light Tackle Club for the 
season of 1911, were the following: 

Paul M. Nippert won the Chas. H. Kewell trophy 
for the largest salmon taken on a Stewart spoon, a 
30 pound salmon. 

E. S. Pomeroy won the Ellery Arms Company 
trophy for the largest salmon taken during the sea- 
son, 39 pounds, 10 ounces in weight. 

Stafford Keesling won the Golcher trophy, for next 
largest salmon, 33 pounds, 10 ounces. 

E. A. Mocker won the J. F. Cooper fly-book trophy, 
for third largest salmon, 33 pounds in weight. 

W. Wilkshire Richards won the C. G. Young trophy, 
with a 32 pound salmon. 

Captain Benson of Sausalito was awarded the 
boatman's prize, $15 in cash. 

The club blue button winners were: Paul H. Nip- 
pert, E. S. Pomeroy, S. Keesling, B, A. Mocker and 
W. W. Richards. A red button was won by O. M. 
Keesling. 

o 

The east side waters of San Pablo bay are pop- 
ulated with myriads of ducks. Rough weather is 
necessary, however, to enable the gunners to get 
into action. During the fair weather the birds can 
keep well out of range. 

From Tomales bay along up the coast, including 
Drake's and Limantour bay, on the Point Reyes 
peninsula, every lagoon and inlet is now the resort 
of big flocks of widgeon, with a pleasing sprinkling 
of canvasback and bluebills, teal and sprig. 



GAME WARDEN WELCH WON. 



In the case of Walter R. Welch vs. Willett Ware, 
as auditor, a proceeding brought in the superior 
court of Santa Cruz county, July 7, 1909, to recover 
$100 salary for June, 1909, claimed to be due Welch 
for his services as fire, fish, and game warden, from 
which office the Linscott board of supervisors pre- 
tended to remove Welch, the supreme court has 
rendered an opinion and made the following order: 
"The judgment is therefore modified, with instruc- 
tions to the superior court to modify its judgment 
by directing the auditor to draw a warrant on the 
treasurer in favor of petitioner for $50 only, for his 
salary as fish and game warden for the month of 
June, 1909, and as so modified the judgment is 
affirmed. The appellant to recover his costs. Lori- 
gan, J. We concur: Shaw, J.; Angelotti, J.; Sloss, 
J.; Melvin, J.; Henshaw, J." 

Although the opinion had not been received in 
Santa Cruz, it was surmised that the supreme court 
may have held that Welch is entitled to salary only 
as fish and game warden in the sum of $50 and 
not as fire warden, because by law the appointment 
as fish and game warden was for a period of two 
years, with removal only for misconduct, while the 
appointment as fire warden was for a term at the 
pleasure of the board of supervisors. 

As the same condition of affairs existed during the 
remainder of the term of Welch, eighteen months, 
the decision virtually decides the subsequent salary 
right. 

Welch, after being thrown out without a hearing 
by the board of supervisors, was reinstated by the 
new or Mattison board of supervisors, and is draw- 
ing his old-time salary. 

The Santa Cruz News in commenting on the case, 
says "it must express admiration for the splendid 
work done in behalf of Walter R. Welch by Attorney 
Charles B. Younger, of Santa Cruz, a good sportsman 
and a keen lawyer. When a man is down and out 
the average man of affairs no longer has any use 
for him; and Welch was down and out when Mr. 
Younger took up his case and set about to get him 
a square deal. 

Welch sued for hi back salary; Judge Smith al- 
lowed it; the appellate court, as usual, reversed 
Judge Smith; and now the supreme court, which is 
the highest tribunal, sustains the contention of Judge 
Smith that Welch is entitled to his salary as game 
warden — the important point, and the one involving 
the principle for which Mr. Younger so ably fought." 

STEELHEAD ANGLING. 



The best steelhead fishing in fifteen years is the 
verdict of many anglers who have tried the Russian 
river at Duncan's Mills during the eight days up to 
last Monday. Last Saturday about two score of 
rodsters made the trip. There was a big repre- 
sentation of fishermen on the job all week long. 

Most of the fish have been caught with roe baited 
hooks. In some favorite pools, the Austin, for in- 
stance, so many rods are out that working with a 
spoon is almost impracticable. The fishing delega- 
tion is made up of veteran experts, just ordinary 
fishermen, novices and amateurs. Some of the less 
skilled fishermen have been cleaned out of tackle 
repeatedly when hooked up with a big steelhead— 
shoestrings and kindling wood will be the lot of your 
tackle if you do not know how to handle the Russian 
river racehorse. 

More than eighty big trout was the reported catch 
for Saturday two weeks ago. Sunday and Monday re- 
sults were about the same. Wednesday's tally is said 
to have gone over 100— this means about half a ton 
of big, fresh run steelhead trout. 

The bar, at the river's mouth, was opened good and 
wide, the recent heavy tides have helped the situa- 
tion. The river water is clear and clean and in- 
dications pointed to a week's, if not longer, continu- 
ance o f the sport. 

Among those who have had a cut in on the big 
fishing spell are: Dr. J. Auburn Wiborn, Al Wilson, 
Dave Sachs, Sam Wells, John P. Babcock, A. T. Sul- 
livan, John McLachlan, E. M. Dickins, H. Schmidt, 
R. N. Root, Bob Sangster, George Roe, Ralph B. La- 
coste, Charles F. Breidenstein, Dr. B. F. Alden, 
Julian Eisenbruck, E. H. Humphreys, Louis Gotthelf, 
W. H. Hillegass and many others. 

The residents of Guerneville and vicinity are also 
enjoying the sport of catching steelhead these days. 
The fishing is good at that point on the river, the 
people there are enthusiastic over the unexpected 
sport. At Monte Rio and other places good catches 
have also been made. 

It is believed by many anglers that the rains dur- 
ing the past week may have put a ban of the sport. 

Phil B. Bekeart was the recipient of three steel- 
head Friday last week that scaled twenty-six pounds, 
sent down by Al Schultz 

Floyd Spence and William Eaton, two members 
of the California Anglers' Association, trolling in To- 
males bay, off Inverness, Sunday, hooked a couple 
of quinnat salmon, weighing eight and six pounds, 
respectively. • 

Market fishermen seining in Tomales bay are send- 
ing boxes of steelhead trout to this city daily. An- 
glers who have fished the tide waters of Paper Mill 
creek, new Point Reyes station, recently had very 
poor luck. 

Reports from Pescadero and San Grogorio lagoons 
are that steelhead had not come in, up to last Friday. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13. 1912. 



AT THE TRAPS. 



Five two-men teams of professional trap shooters, 
representing Portland, Seattle, Spokane, Tacoma and 
San Francisco will start on a tour of the Northwest 
next week, inaugurating a novel scheme intended to 
aid the work of the recently organized American 
Game Protection and Propagation Association and to 
stimulate trap shooting throughout the section trav- 
ersed. Some of the best known shots in the West 
will make the trip. 

The scheme includes the holding of at least twenty- 
five contests throughout Oregon, Washington, Idaho 
and Utah during the next two months, starting in 
Ashland, Ore., and finishing in Salt Lake City. All 
five teams will compete in each contest and the team 
having the highest percentage of wins at the close 
of the schedule, a la baseball, will be awarded the 
pennant and a handsome cash prize. All shots will 
be held under the auspices of the Interstate Asso- 
ciation. 

Peter J. Holohan and W. A. Robertson will com- 
pose the Portland team, H. E. Poston and Fred Bro- 
ger will represent Spokane, L. R. Barkley and E. B. 
Morris, Seattle; F. C. Riehl and Abner Blair, Ta- 
coma; W. F. Willet and Ike Fisher will represent 
San Francisco. 

The rules governing the contest provide that each 
contestant shall be allowed 100 targets and that all 
tie contests shall be shot off on the ground imme- 
diately after the match, each man being allowed 25 
targets. A percentage of the contests won will be 
kept and the team scoring the highest number of 
wins at the end of the twenty-five contests will be 
awarded a handsome trophy provided by the Inter- 
state Association and the American Game Protection 
and Propagation Association, besides the pennant 
and cash prize. 

The schedule to date follows: Ashland, Ore., Jan- 
uary 15th; Medford, Ore., January 16th; Roseburg, 
January 17th; Eugene, January 19th; Salem, Jan- 
uary 20th, and Portland, January 21st. From Port- 
land the teams will travel north to Tacoma and 
Seattle and probably will make a side trip into 
British Columbia, taking in Vancouver and Victoria. 
Leaving the Coast at Seattle they will work west to 
Spokane, and the south to Lewiston and Boise, Idaho, 
and Salt Lake City. 



Live bird shooting is a sport that holds strong 
with the sportsmen of the antipodes. An account of 
a recent match at Melbourne follows: 

A pigeon match at 100 birds, 30 yards rise, for 
£ 100 a side, between W. D. Wilkinson and R. Arnst, 
the champion sculler, decided at Melbourne on Fri- 
day, November 17th, was won by the former, who 
killed 90 birds, while Arnst's score wos 85. Almost 
from the start, says the Melbourne correspondent of 
the Sydney "Referee," the £200 seemed safe money 
for the Victorian. Wilkinson, who was the first to 
shoot, lost his bird, and Arnst, getting a scorcher, 
failed also. Wilkinson's next loss was made in the 
twelfth round, and another cypher going against his 
name in the twenty-fifth, he thus accounted for 22 
birds out of his first 25 birds. He used his second 
barrel seven times — once for safety. Arnst was 
clean beaten by his third bird. He killed three and 
missed another, killed two and made another miss. 
Then he grassed three, and another cleared the fence. 
Four more birds fell to his gun, and the fifth went 
out. He scored two kills, and was once more beaten, 
making a loss of seven birds in his first 25. He only 
had occasion to use his left barrel on three of the 
birds he scored, and had he been a smarter and more 
accurate shot in this department of shooting he 
may have secured four of the birds that crossed the 
fence. Thus early the contest was relieved of a 
good deal of the interest that surrounded it. The 
competitors scored equally, 22 kills each, in the 
second stage of 25 birds, and in the third stage Arnst 
accounted for 23 against 22. This left the scores — 
Wilkinson 66, Arnst 63. Arnst still had a chance, 
but a rather remote one, as Wilkinson is a great 
finisher, and does not know what nerves are. In the 
last 25 birds he only made one failure, while Arnst 
made three. Wilkinson therefore won with 90 kills 
against 85. The birds were a grand even lot, with 
no wind to assist them, and it says much for their 
quality that only one of the 200 was barred by the 
referee, and only one sat on the trap. Arnst made 
the best break of the match, viz: 18; Wilkinson's 
best run was 14, which he put together during the 
run home. The winner used his second barrel 19 
times and the loser 16 times. Arnst has expressed 
his intention of making another match with Wil- 
kinson, as he says he was not at all satisfied with 
his own shooting, particularly at the first 25 birds. 

o 

Leo Weinand and W. J. Street have blinds located 
in the bay near McNear's Point, where bluebills and 
"cans" are so susceptible to the attraction of wood- 
enheaded ducks that they have had much difficulty 
in distributing numerous limits shot since the sea- 
son opened. 

About this time of the year the black sea brant 
should be "working in" to the head of Tomales bay 
from the ocean on low tides, seeking the eel grass 
feeding grounds. Late reports this week state that 
the sea brant were coming in plentifully. 

The Alvarado section of the Alameda marsh shoot- 
ing grounds has been in line recently for fairly good 
duck shooting. John Ferguson, Chris Wolfen, John 
Boyd, Fred W. Munday and H. Miller of the Pioneer 
Gun Club found sprig limits not so difficult to secure 
as at other resorts on the marsh. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Striped Bass Notes — Striped bass are plentiful and 
big in Russian river. One man on Christmas day 
fished for the bass, which were visible in a big 
school in the narrows at the head of Austin pool and 
landed twenty-two that scaled about 250 pounds, an 
average of about 10% pounds each. These fish were 
taken by the "snagging" process. A line armed 
with a number of sharp hooks was cast into the 
water and dragged through and over the fish, which 
were all hooked foul. 

Angling operations for striped bass in the Rodeo 
waters have been exceedingly unproductive recently 
for the rod and line men. The fish are in that sec- 
tion, however, for a 45 pounder was caught one day 
last week. 

A workman at the Western Oil Refinery noticed 
a commotion in the water close to shore. Investi- 
gating, he discovered the big bass stranded in a 
shallow rocky pool. The man procured a hammer 
and pounded the fish upon the head and killed it. 

The San Antone and Wingo pilgrims for several 
weeks have not returned with enough striped bass to 
cover an ordinary frying pan. 

William West, the Napa angler, in a letter to 
Charles H. Kewell recently stated that striped bass 
fishing in Napa creek and its branches is absolutely 
non-productive of fish at present. That is somewhat 
of a puzzling condition of affairs, for last year at this 
time the sport was very good. 



Battle With a Tuna. — The Los Angeles Times had 
a very interesting account concerning a fight with 
a 170 lb. tuna, and the battle was witnessed by 2000 
spectators, and lasted for eighteen hours recently. 
Among other items the article contains the follow- 
ing: "Immediately daylight broke crowds" thronged 
the beaches armed with field and marine glasses to 
watch the finish. The shouts which came from the 
excited spectators resounded miles through the can- 
yons, back at Avalon, as the Tuna Club flag was run 
to the masthead after the battle. Angler Stockton 
will become a member of the Tuna Club at its next 
regular meeting. With his hands torn and bleeding, 
and every muscle of his body knotted by exertion, ex- 
citement, and exposure, the angler was assisted out 
of the launch Mabel F. when the battle had been 
won. All on board had been drenched to the skin, 
and angler and boatman were covered with the van- 
quished tuna's blood. It is estimated a distance 
of 30 miles had been covered by the fish and the 
boat. Circles, angles, and every figure known in 
Euclid were described. In two places of the line 
one of the strands had worn itself through against 
the leather thumb-brake on the reel, and all but the 
sides of this had been worn down to paper thick- 
ness. The stout hickory rod resembled a crooked 
stick. The angler had worn through the finger ends 
of two pairs of buckskin mits. The strike was made 
at 3 o'clock on Wednesday, off Long Point, and the 
battle closed in Avalon bay, less than one mile from 
the shore, at 7:57 o'clock on Thursday morning. 
Three times at night the angler was fed with food- 
stuffs while he held to his task. He had never 
before landed any fish larger than a speckled brook 
trout. "Between reeling and pumping he ate his 
food. With his feet against the guard rail of the 
launch, and both hands pressed hard on the brakes, 
he was fed, masticating as he fought the fish. Human 
endurance and physical tension were at their height. 
For two hours no one spoke. Undoubtedly, could the 
length of line reeled in by Stockton be accurately 
measured, it would probably cover several miles. A 
tuna will "pull back' a line so often that it will 
wear through and snap with its own weight in 
water Many times during the fight boats were sent 
to enquire. Megaphones were used, and only a small 
skiff was allowed to approach near the scene of 
contest. The fish was 2 feet longer than Mr. Stock- 
ton." 



Woman Slays a Lion. — For the first time in so 
many years no one in the office of the State Control- 
ler remembers when the feat was performed, a wom- 
an has slain a California mountain lion, skinned the 
beast and claimed the bounty. This huntress is Miss 
Amelia Bussell, and it was near China Flat, Hum- 
boldt county, that the ferocious lion bit the dust 
following her unerring aim. For killing the beast 
she will receive a bounty of $20 from the State of 
California, State Controller Nye having already 
drawn the warrant for that amount in her favor. 

Twenty-two lions were killed in the State during 
November, and the warrants issued at the office of 
the State Controller, at the rate of $20 each, making 
a total of $440, show that the animals bit the dust 
in the mountains of Siskiyou, in the valleys of Te- 
hama, in the foothills of Shasta, in the dry San 
Joaquin and also on the desert of San Diego and 
Los Angeles. 



Monterey County Trapping. — Bob Neal came 
in from his camp at the headwaters of the Soquel 
river a day or two ago and brought a lot of traps. 
Neal is engaged in catching the festive raccoon and 
the elusive fox, with an occasional bobcat, all being 
plentiful in that section. He trapped $25 worth of 
animals last month and with an augmented lot 
of traps expects to break the record between now 
and the end of the year. 

Neal says there is a pesky mountain lion or two in 
the neighborhood that he expects to get soon. These 
big cats have a habit of coming down to the camp 
and singing songs in the moonlignt for the edification 
of himself and dog, the only occupants of the place. 



Up to date, however, the lions have not drawn close 
enough to admit being pecked with a rifle, although 
Neal has taken several shots. 



Doings of the Commission. — The State Fish and 
Game Commissioners have stationed the launch Shad 
at Sacramento. The Audubon will be shifted from 
the Capital City to Stockton, from which point the 
boat will patrol the San Joaquin River and tributary 
waters. 

The Quinnat, the flagship of the State fleet, will 
be the principal patrol boat with mooring station 
at a bay point in close touch with the main office in 
this city. 

A band of 150 wild turkeys at the State Game 
Farm are now available for general distribution at 
different points in this State where environment is 
favorable for stocking with the birds. 

With branch offices in Sacramento, Los Angeles 
and Fresno the work of the Commisison will be 
greatly accelerated. It is the intention to establish 
eventually branch offices — embracing eight to ten 
county jurisdictions, with a force of from ten to 
fifteen deputies attached to each, all over the State. 

The Sacramento office of the commission, in the 
Forum building, will be in full working order about 
January 15, covering a territory north of San Joaquin 
county and east of the Coast Range. 

The territory immediately under the direction of 
the San Francisco office takes in the country from 
San Luis Obispo county north and west of the Coast 
Range. 

South of Tehachapi, including Inyo county in the 
west, will be under supervision of the Los Angeles 
branch. 

Attached to the Fresno office is the lower San 
Joaquin Valley and the country east of the Coast 
Range. 

The proposed plan to supply valley quail, 6000 
dozen to be procured in Lower California, for re- 
stocking depleted sections of this State is tempor- 
arily under a handicap. The aftermath cf the revo- 
lution has prevented getting, for the time being, any 
birds from across the line. 

An effort will be made to partially make up the 
shortage by getting quail from Coachella and that 
vicinity. Ranchers have recently complained that 
the quail are so numerous that crops have been seri- 
ously damaged by the birds. 



Hunting Notes. — The cold spell during a week ago 
put a setback on the duck hunters' sp;rt. At many 
marsh shooting resorts the baited ponds were plated 
with a thick coating of ice, particularly so on Wed- 
nesday morning. Such a state of affairs forced the 
ducks to take refuge in sloughs and open bodies of 
water, where if they could not feed they were at 
least safe from the attentions of the gunners. 

The San Pablo Bay birds at Sobrante, Pinole, San 
Pablo and other shore points have enabled many 
hunters to enjoy canvasback and bluebill shooting. 
These deep water ducks have been resorting to the 
east side shores in flocks of thousands. 

Around Mount Eden, Russells and Alvarado but 
fair shooting has been the rule. Further south, on 
the Alameda marshes, many limits have been shot 
on spring and teal ducks. The Suisun marshes 
have been less prolific in limit bags for the past 
week than heretofore. Sunday the flight was rather 
a light one. Good shooting was had, however, at the 
Sunrise, Seymour and Green Lodge preserves. 

The Wednesday visitors at the club houses fared a 
bit better. Good sport was enjoyed at the Volante, 
Allegre, Tule Belle and other shooting grounds. 

Reports from different valley points state that 
ducks were plentiful up to Wednesday, when the 
cold spell, it was believed, drove the birds away. 
From the sudden appearance of thousands of sprig, 
widgeon and teal on Suisun and San Pablo bays, it 
is supposed that the visitors were from the valley 
regions. 

At Newman, on New Year's Day, Otto Feudner, 
C. C. Huber and other members of the Newman Gun 
Club had a great shoot on sprig. 

News from Firebaugh's is rather assuring for 
good sport today and tomorrow. Birds are fairly 
plentiful. The Wednesday shooting was very good. 

Arthur Ehrenpfort and other members of the Gus- 
tine Gun Club found the best shooting in the sloughs, 
the ducks having temporarily left the ponds. 

Joe Harlan, Ned Bosqui and other members of 
the Field and Tule Club, were at the Los Banos pre- 
serve last Sunday. 

Lee Harpham tried a change a week ago and de- 
voted his attention to a good quail ground near 
Halfmoon Bay. 

Lincoln Gun Club members have had but slim 
returns for the past week on bay shore shooting 
trips near Reclamation. Black Point and Petaluma 
Creek hunters have had to work hard for the few 
birds gathered. Rough water on the bay and a 
norther is needed for good duck shooting in that 
locality. 

Dr. Charles E. Turner, formerly of Vallejo and a 
well known sportsman, writes from Big Pine, Inyo 
county, and gives the pleasing information that duck 
and quail shooting in that part of the State is first 
class. Mountain sheep are plentiful; also protected 
by law at present. More of the sheep are to be found 
in Mono than in Inyo county. 

Monterey quail shooters have had good quail 
shooting recently. Romie Jacks and his guests at 
the Jacks ranch for several days had fine sport 
with quail and ducks as well. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 13, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



AN APPRECIATION OF BUDD DOBLE. 



(By John Splan.) 

It gives me great pleasure to comply with your 
request for a story of Mr. Budd Doble, a man whom 
1 have always liked and admired from my boyhood 
days. I have spent many pleasant hours with him 
and have had some desperate battles on the turf with 
him; have learned many things from him regarding 
horses and horsemanship which have been useful to 
me in my business, and 1 am glad to avail myself 
of this opportunity to sincerely thank him for the 
pleasure and assistance he has always given me. 

I have always believed that successful men and 
great horses were specially created with the charac- 
teristics and instincts which made them successful 
and famous. 1 have known many people, during 
my career, w ho were very horsey, but have had the 
pleasure of meeting but few who were real genuine 
horsemen, and that Mr. Doble was a real horseman 
goes without saying. He came honestly by it; was 
bred and born a horseman; his father before him 
was a grand character and' one of the best horsemen 
of his day. Mr. Doble often told me himself that 
the training he had early in life from his father and 
a few other noted men, had greatly to do with his 
wonderfully successful career. Another positive 
proof to me that he was born a great horseman was 
the fact that Hiram Woodruff, the most noted 
trainer of his day, selected him, who at that time 
had no special reputation, to take charge of Dexter, 
a horse looked upon as the coming wonder of the 
horse world. I remember distinctly that the press 
advised the public to be careful in betting their 
money on this horse in his coming races, as he had 
been transferred from the training and management 
of the greatest trainer in the world to an inexperi- 
enced young man, who only had the endorsement of 
Mr. Woodruff to recommend him. This proves what 
expert testimony is worth, and Mr. Woodruff was 
an expert horseman, as he was also a good judge of 
men and their ability. 

Dexter's career, under Mr. Doble's management, 
was short but very brilliant, yet long enough to 
prove to the public that he was the champion of 
champions and that Mr. Doble was a real horseman. 
In those days if the owner claimed his horse a 
champion he had to come out in the open and meet 
all competitors. They raced horses under many 
different conditions, and Dexter was no exception to 
the rule. He went many races in harness hooked to 
sulky; others under saddle, not cnly one-mile heats 
but longer distances. He raced to skeleton wagons, 
and on several occasions gave his opponents handi- 
caps and other advantages from the fact that he 
raced hitched to a four-wheel skeleton wagon while 
they raced nitched to sulky. After beating all 
opponents in different hitches he was asked to go 
against a trotter with a running mate, and there was 
only one horse (Ethan Allen) in the world who could 
beat him, even after giving them that great advan- 
tage. In addition to that, Dexter had, when Mr. 
Doble parted with him, the world's record, mile heats 
to saddle, and mile heats to harness also. Most 
any man can take a gun and hit the target once in 
a while, but it takes a real expert to make a string 
cf center shots. That holds good in other voca- 
tions in life as well as in horsemanship. That Mr. 
Doble's reputation and success came not only through 
the handling of Dexter, and was not a chance shot, 
is amply proven by the many successes he had with 
other noted horses in after life. 

His next charge, Goldsmith Maid, I knew long 
before she went to his stable, and of all the horses 
I had ever seen she was the most unpromising pros- 
pect for a useful horse, much less a champion, I 
had ever known. Her career certainly reads like a 
romance. Mr. Doble took possession of her in 
1867; she had a record of 2:32 and the reputation 
of being one of the worst gaited and most unman- 
ageable trotters that ever wore harness. She raced 
continuously from that time until 1877, when she 
was twenty-one years old, all over the country; over 
all kinds of tracks; was called upcn to meet and 
defend her title against every pood horse that was 
produced. That she did all this and many other 
impossible feats in turf history, shows that she 
must have led a very strenuous life. I think one of 
her most wonderful feats was when she trotted and 
won the second heat in a winning race in 2: 14% 
after she was twenty-one years old. At that time 
2:14 was the world's record, and she was the only 
horse that had beaten 2:15. 

The financial result of this successful campaign 
of many years with one horse should prove con- 
clusively that Mr. Doble had a good business strain 
in his character, and had he taken to finances in- 
stead of to horsemanship he would probably have 
been a J. Pierpont Morgan. When you take into 
consideration that he deposited to the credit of 
Goldsmith Maid, out of her earnings, $355,000 cash, 
it would be easy to award him the blue ribbon as 
holder of the world's record for that financial suc- 
cess, and had Mr. Doble never trained or driven 
another horse, I, for one, would have taken off my 
hat to him as a shining star in his profession. 

Coming down to the later day connection of the 
turf, I cannot remember where I ever saw him drive 
even one bad race. I think he made fewer mis- 
takes and put up a more perfect performance than 
most any man I ever saw. To my mind one of the 
best things he ever did was the race he won with 
Monroe Chief over the Lexington track. The horse 
came under Mr. Doble's control after he had passed 
through the hands of two very successful trainers, 
and at a time of life when he was supposed to be 
in the discard. I am sure no one ever had the 
slightest idea that he could be brought back and 



make the best performance of his life, but that is 
just what he did do, but not until after Mr. Doble 
had trained him for a year. Rosa Wilkes was one 
of the successful horses of that year, and looked to 
be unbeatable in her class; these two horses came 
together at the Lexington fall meeting, and it was 
a battle of six heats. They had two heats apiece 
and a dead heat; the horse beat her the deciding 
heat, and, if I remember rightly, beat his own best 
record in that race. In weeks afterwards he went 
out for a purse to try and beat what was then a 
two-mile record, which he accomplished with some- 
thing 10 spare; that is what I call making a center 
shot. 

That the time and years didn't interfere with Mr. 
Doble's success was proven to me by one horse he 
trained and raced after he had given up active 
interest in the business, and, like Monroe Chief, this 
particular horse had been passed along; was sup- 
posed to have gone beyond his days of usefulness. 
This was the bay gelding called The Roman; he 
had a record of 2:10 1 / i, had been fairly successful 
in a way, and when he came to Mr. Doble no one 
thought of his having a chance to win a race. I 
was in a position to watch the training of this 
horse closely, and if ever a horse was scientifically 
trained this was one. The first time Mr. Doble 
started him I do not think he had driven a horse in 
ten years. The Roman had always had the repu- 
tation of being a bad scorer, but when he came out 
for the race he seemed to be the one perfectly man- 
nered horse of the lot. He won the first heat in 
2:09%, second in 2:09%, third in 2:09%, thereby beat- 
ing his previous best record in each heat and hav- 
ing to defeat a large field of horses in his own class. 
It seemed a strange thing to me how few people 
seemed to have ever heard of the man. If the sharp- 
shooters and rail birds and people in general who 
were always looking for long-shots around the race 
track had ever heard of Doble, they must certainly 
have forgotten all about it, judging 'from the manner 
in which they played their money when it came to 
the betting proposition. He was certainly the long 
shot of that year. Mr. Doble picked out Kinney Lou 
in the field, trained and fitted him to such perfect 
manners and condition that he made himself the 
champion of his class the first year he raced him. 

You ask me how I compare Mr. Doble with the 
present-day trotting horse trainer and driver. Some- 
body has said that comparisons are odious, and for 
that reason I'd like to answer you in some other 
way. The methods of training and the system of 
racing of years ago were so entirely different from 
the present day methods that it would perhaps be 
unfair to both the trainer and driver of that day 
and the trainer of today to draw any comparison at 
all. I have the greatest respect for the ability of 
the drivers of today, and if I knew of anyone going 
out to race with them and expecting to hold his own, 
I would certainly advise that gentleman to get him- 
self fit and ready before he started out. 

If I should write of all the great things that 
this justly famous man has done, it would take all 
the space of the Christmas number of the Trotter 
and Pacer, which would be a little selfish on my 
part, as I know you have many other correspondents 
who will write more interestingly than I can, but I 
want to say to the young man who is starting out 
in life expecting to make a successful trainer and 
driver of the trotting horse, if he will prove to me 
that he can ride a trotter under the saddle as well 
as Mr. Doble could in his time; train and drive a 
horse in harness; fit him to go one, two or three 
heats, hitched and rigged in any way, or if the occa- 
sion required could hitch two trotters in double 
harness and go out and drive either in a race or 
against the watch, I will be glad to give him my 
personal endorsement as being qualified to graduate 
in the up-to-date school of driving and training. — 
Trotter and Pacer. 



TROTTERS FOR INDIA. 



IMPROVEMENT AT THE STADIUM. 



San Francisco is to have the finest athletic field 
in the- world. Already the park commissioners have 
appropriated the money for building the great track, 
and President Eliott of the Pacific Athletic Asso- 
ciation has indorsed the plans that have been drawn 
up to be submitted to Superintendent John McLaren 
next week. 

According to the plans, the track will be the most 
complete permanent track in regard to details that 
can be found in any part of the world. Every de- 
tail has been taken into consideration. There have 
been many tracks built in this country that have 
been pronounced perfect, but these have not been 
permanent affairs and have only been built for the 
special occasions. The most notable of these tem- 
porary tracks was the one for the Olympic games 
in St. Louis in 1904. That track was pronounced by 
experts from all over the world to be superior to 
anything in any section of the globe. 

The new stadium track embodies all the great 
features that the St. Louis track had, with many 
added details. The track is at present situated at the 
east end of the stadium, but the new plans calls for 
its removal to the west end. The concrete grand- 
stand that at present is located at the finishing line 
of the trotting track, will be continued the entire way 
around the bend of the stadium and will bo capable 
of seating 30,000 people. 

The money for the work has already been appro- 
priated, and as soon as Superintendent McLaren ap- 
proves of the plans work will be begun. It will be 
completed in plenty of time for the holding of the 
Olympic game trials, which are scheduled to take 
place in this city June 6. 



Pour typical American trotting horses are now 
in New York awaiting shipment to Baroda, in India 
a trip of 10,000 miles. They are going to the Mahar- 
ajah, who has lately been so much in the public eye, 
as the central figure of an international episode in 
connection with the coronation of the Emperor of 
India, and who learned to like American trotters by 
driving a pair of them when in New York a year or 
two ago. The horses are blood bays, with black 
legs, manes and tails and without a white hair on 
one of them. Together, they make a stunning four- 
in-hand team, and as such they are to be driven 
by a princess of India, the Maharajah having pur- 
chased them as a present for his daughter, who is 
soon to be married. The leaders are 15.3 hands 
high and the wheelers are 16 hands. One of the 
leaders can trot a 2:20 gait, it is said, and another 
of the four is a capital saddle horse. All are geld- 
ings and all have long tails. 

A well-known New York dealer selected the horses 
in the West a few days ago, and their buyer says that 
one of the animals is by the famous blind horse 
Rhymthmic 2:06%, that went through the Grand 
Circuit 10 years ago sweeping everything before him 
The horses will be kept in New York until the lat- 
ter part of this month to condition and school them 
They will then be shipped to London, England, and 
from there to Bombay, India, whence they will go by 
rail to their new home. 

They are said to be the first horses of their breed 
ever sent to India, and their shipment to that far- 
away country is a reminder that the hoofbeats of the 
American trotter have in the last two decades lit- 
erally circled the globe. Representatives of the 
breed that originated in New York State not much 
more than half a century ago have gone to Great 
Britain and Ireland and every country in Europe to 
Siberia, China, Japan, Australia, North and South 
Africa, Asia Minor and South America 



ANSWERS TO CO R R EC PON DENTS. 



K. L. E.— Greater pains should be taken in com- 
piling catalogues. I see by the one I have of the 
o,o „ of . H> Brace ' s horses that Banker's Daughter 
2:13% is by Arthur Wilkes out of Sunflower 2:24 by 
Elmo; second dam Ella Kellogg by Chieftain. Is 
this correct? 

Ans.— No. Barney Simpson, who is now at Pleas- 
anton, says: "The mare was by Arthur Wilkes, but 
her dam was a mare called Mayflower." He thinks 
she was by Chieftain, but Chas. Gilmore, of Red 
Bluff, who bred Banker's Daughter, has moved to 
Montana; his brother Frank, who lives there, must 
know. This mare Sunflower was a beautiful chest- 
nut mare with silver mane and tail, that was sold at 
the Old Bay District track many years ago She 
had a record of 2:28 and was bred to Director 2-17 
by Mr. Salisbury and sold to E. J. Travis, his partner 
in Chicago, where she dropped a filly that was after- 
wards known as Director's Flower 2:19%. 

How was Kavanaugh's Grey Eagle bred? What 
did he sire? Ans.— By Grey Eagle out of a mare by 
Imported Tranby. He sired Lucy Mershon (dam of 
Andy Mershon 2:25%), and Gyp (dam of Gralton 
2:22i4, a noted trotter who wen many races in 1875), 
one of Kavanaugh's Grey Eagles' (laughters pro- 
duced the sire Edgewater, and another produced the 
dam of Billy Wilkes 2:29%. The splendid article 
by Samuel Gamble in our Holiday edition, gives the 
dam of the great horse Elmo 2:27, as by this horse, 
out of a mare by Imp. Glencoe. It is not to be won- 
dered at, therefore, that he was a remarkably hand- 
some and game trotting horse, for there was plenty 
of the best of thoroughbred blood in his veins. 

How was the stallion Sample bred? Ans.— Sample 
was a bay horse foaled 1876 sired by Wayland For- 
rest dam Tinsley Maid (dam of Buccaneer) by Flax- 
tail; grandam Fanny Fern by Irwin's Blind Tucfca- 
hoe, son of Herod's Tuckahoe; great grandam by 
Leffler's Consul, son of Shepperd's Consul. 

SAN FRANCISCO DRIVING CLUB. 

The regular election for officers of this club for 
the ensuing year took place at Tiv Hall last Fri- 
day evening, and a more spirited one never was held 
There were two tickets in the field, but the one 
headed by William J. Kenney was elected. Mr 
Kenney has been for five years its president, and 
under his administration the club has increased its 
membership from 16 to 168. There was much bet- 
ting on the result and members from all parts of 
California were present. To show that they took 
an interest in it something over $350 was collected In 
dues. After a plain statement of incontrovertible 
facts by the President to the utter discomfiture of 
those who attempted to discredit his management, 
the following officers were elected: President, Will- 
iam J. Kenney; vice president, Fred Edwards; sec- 
retary, Fred Lauterwasser Jr.; treasurer, Fred Lau- 
terwasser Sr.; sergeant-at-arms, A. Schottler; stew- 
ards, John Nowland, James Kramer, J. E. Finch, A. 
Ottinger, and A. Hoffman. The last named being 
the only one on the opposition ticket receiving a 
majority. 



Of the new 2:10 performers twenty-three were bred 
in Kentucky, two is the Hoosier State, twenty In 
California, eighteen in Illinois, thirteen in Ohio, nine 
In Tennessee, and the balance scattered throughout 
eighteen States and Canada. The majority of them 
were owned and developed a long ways from where 
they were bred. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 



VALUE OF THE DAIRY COW. 



In estimating profits in dairying it 
is a common error to credit the cows 
with the returns «for butterfat only 
and charge them with feed, shelter 
and the labor in the cost of produc- 
tion. Be it said to the honor of good 
cows that many are found profitable 
by this method of estimating their 
worth, but this is not the whole 
truth. There are other credits that 
should be made if the cows are to 
have a square deal. 

Where several cows are kept pigs 
should also be raised to consume the 
skimmed milk. It is estimated that 
the skimmed milk is worth 25 cents 
a hundred pounds for feeding pigs. If 
good cows only are kept, the calves 
will be worth something and if pas- 
ture be available the cost of keeping 
the calves until they are salable will 
not be large. 

It must not be forgotten that the 
milk, cream and butter used in the 
home should be carefully considered 
and may reduce the cost of living 
one-third or even one-half. The cows 
should be credited with the products 
used by the family as well as those 
marketed. 

Another source of profit from the 
dairy cow that is often treated lightly 
is the manure. When properly saved 
and liberally applied the barnyard ma- 
nure from a well-fed cow will pay 
for the labor of milking, feeding and 
handling the milk. Estimated upon 
the basis of the plant food alone in 
the manure it is worth from $20 to $25 
per cow a year. This does not include 
the value of the manure to improve 
the physical condition of the soil, 
which is often equal to the value of 
the elements of plant food. 

The dairy cow is a machine to con- 
vert coarse products from the farm 
into butterfat, thus returning most of 
the fertility to the farm and affording 
a market for the products of the farm. 

Justice demands that we give the 
cow credit for her products when we 
charge her for all she eats and the 
expense of making her comfortable in 
winter. 



THE DAKE 

ADVERTISING 

AGENCY 

Inc. 

(Est. 1878.) 



Authorized representative of every publication 
of repute In the world . 

Campaigns Planned, 

Propositions Submitted, 

for All Classes of Publicity. 

Exclusive advertising representatives of Califor- 
nia weekly newspaper lists: 

List of 25. i per inch 
List of 40. $1 per inch 
List of 80. $s per inch 

For big results— list of :!6 leading Sunday news- 
papers— $1.25 per word for entire list. 

Lists furnished of Leading Magazines, Mail Or- 
der Publications. Agricultural Publications, and 
Magazines for Women,— quoting publishers' 
lowest rates. 

Rates quoted on Pacific Coast papers. 
Classified advertisements In California dailies: 

25 words, one week, in 45 Southern Cali- 
fornia papers, $40. 

6. r > Northern and Central California pap- 
ers, $55. 

Recognized by the American Newspaper Pub- 
lishers Association, and by the Quoin Club of 
New York. 



THE DAKE 

ADVERTISING 

AGENCY 

Inc. 

Geary St., SAN FRANCISCO 
432 So. Main St., LOS ANGELES 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

Gombault's )■**, 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



For 



—It is jK-mtrat 
ng, soothing and 
healing, and tor all Old 
Ik at Sural, Bruisei.or 
IllB Wounds, Felona, 
Exterior Cancers, Boili 

Human iw^t 

CAUSTIC BALSAM hat 



Body 



Liun 



a] 



We would say to all 
who buy it that it does 
not contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its 1 1 
ternal use. Persistent, 
therouoh use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case that 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



Perfectly Safe 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
for 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all Stiff Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 

CornhlU. Tax — "One bottle Cauetlc Balaam did 
my rheumatism more food than $120 00 paid in 
doctor , bills •• OTTO A. BEYKR. 

Price a 1 .BO per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent 
by at express prepaid Write (or Booklet R. 

The LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY. Cleveland, 0. 



TRIANGLE TRIP 

OVER THE 

Northwestern Pacific Railroad 

One of the most delightful scenic 
one-day jaunts in America. 

150 miles of Mountain and Redwood For- 
est Scenery, a Boat Ride on San 
Francisco Bay and l>y rail along 
the Russian River. 

Leave San Francisco 7:45 A. M. dally 
except Sunday, and 8:45 A. M. Sunday 
only, by boat across the Bay of San 
Francisco, in full view of the Golden 
Gate to Sausalito (the Sorrento of 
America). Thence via picturesque San 
Rafael and thriving Petaluma (home of 
the chicken Industry), through Sonoma 
Valley to Santa Rosa and Fulton. From 
Fulton, through magnificent mountain 
scenery and redwood forests and along 
Russian River, to Monte Rio. Return 
Is made along the coast, passing To- 
males Bay, Point Reyes, San Anselmo, 
etc., to Sausalito arriving at San Fran- 
cisco 7:35 P. M. dally the same evening. 

If preferred, trip can be reversed, 
leaving San Francisco at 8:15 A. M. via 
the coast to Monte Rio and returning 
along the river and through the val- 
leys, arriving at San Francisco 7:35 
P. M. dally except Sunday and 7:05 
P. M. Sunday the same evening. 

Round Trip Fare for Triangle Trip, $2.80, 
except on Fridays or Saturdays, it Is $2 50 
and on Sundays only $2.20. 
Tickets on sale at 874 Market Street (Flood Bldg.) 
and Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office . 



CARE OF THE CALF. 



The only calves to be saved from a 
dairy herd are the heifers unless the 
herd is purebred and then only the 
promising bulls should be saved. 
When the calf is born and is a day 
old, it should be taken from its mother 
and fed milk. A good dairy cow al- 
ways produces more milk than is nec- 
essary for the calf and not knowing 
any better the little animal will drink 
it as long as there is a drop in the 



CHAS. WHITEHEAD'S 

Public Training Stable 

Pleesanton Race Track 

PLEA8ANTON, CAL. 

Horses and colts trained at reason- 
able rates for next season's campaign. 
Best of care given. Developed and 
campaigned successfully the Futurity 
stake winners North Star 2:11%, Delia 
Derby 2:11% and many others. Address 

CHAS. WHITEHEAD, Plensnnton, Cal. 



The Finest Winter Training Track in 
America. 

—THE- 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 

There are about 50 box stalls in first- 
class shape, newly roofed, and ready for 
occupancy. Horsemen who intend to 
campaign their horses next season should 
not delay too long if they want to pre- 
pare them on this track, which is uni- 
versally acknowledged to be the safest 
and best in existence. These stalls will 
not be vacant long. For further par- 
ticulars apply to 

H. E. ARMSTRONG, 

Proprietor. 




DON'T FAIL TO GET SAVE-THE-H0RSE BOOK 

Lameness and diseases causing lameness are not such fcistraos and serious natters since Sa»e-The-Horse was discovered. 

and why we give an ironclad contract to refund money. 
OFFICE OF JOHN €. MCIIOLS, Mayor. 



Our newSAVE-THE-HOKSE BOOK Lb an ency. 
cloiM/diaof practical und complete retYreneea. It la 
i In' latest, most reliable and highest authority. It is 
scientific but not technical. Takes in every scope 
and character of diseases causing lameness. 

MA I LEO WITHOUT CHARGE. 

Send for copy. 

EXPERT ADVICE FREE frankly and clearly what to do. 

Send lor eopy 
of eontrart. Save* 
The-Uorse Book, 
and letter* Iron 
Breeders, business 
banker* 




world ot 



■ un 



y kind ol ease, 
l ■ > ears' success. 

ROT A LOST DAT 
WITH THE HORSE, 



nd l 



nit* | 



■ ab> 



luteiy certain ( 

Note 
mitated. 
ill nst ra- 
ni othods 
aro Copied, then 
r..«i will nnder- 
tsl^ud iti success 



Janisviui. Wis.. Sept. 26. 1911. 
Troy Chemical Co.. Binehamton, N . Y : Send one bottle 
SaTe-The-llorse. I used it OB mare that threw two bog sparing 
and it did the work 0. K. Same mare e»t a bad wire cut on 
ankle, leaving a thick etlloil— J enlargement Two-third* of 
a bottle reduced it >>ver half, one niore bottle will reduce the 
rest. Send by return express. JOHN C NICHOLS. 

Read What a BanKer and Business Man Old With 
Save-The»Hor*e. 
Cleveland. 0.— Last fall at Lexington. Ky . I bought the finest 
saddle and carriage horse it wasevi-r my plrnsuro to own. Dur- 
ing the winter he threw out as large a th< .rough pin as lever 
saw. You can imagine my disappointment in having un -ha fine 
animal disfigured. I heard of yon and bourht one bottle, with 
result that lump on bolh sides of WW is entirely gone and has 
been a matter of romiuent on the part of every one who has 
seen It. The hock is to-day absolutely clean. I shall be glad to 
show horse to the most expert veterinary There is no trace of 
the trouble. W. P. MURRAY, 

Proprietor Murray Stock Farm. West Mentor. Ohio, 
bottle, with a contract to absolutely and perma- 
ntlycure Bons md Bog Spavin. Thirouobpin. RinibM* 
'(except low). Curb, Splint, Capped Hoch. Wmdnutf. 
Shoe Boil, Injured Tendons snd sli Ismentss or REFUND THE MONET. 



9S.s 



No 



rlo 



ol hi 



H" 



ual. 



$5 SI stl Druggiils or Ossters or Eiprets Paid U. S n»d CsssoY 

TliOY i III mi ll CO.. Commercial A»e„ Ulaabamlnn. N- • 



TROY CHEMICAL CO., BINGHAMTOX, N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 

66 Bayo Vista Avenue. Oakland, Cal. 2S1 Kearny Street, San FrancUco, Cal. 



IN THE FIELD 



MAKING 

MONEY- 



if 



mi 



or in the Barn Wasting It 

Whether your horses work or not, their feed costs you big money. When a horse is laid up you 
not only lose the cost of feed, but also the profit that the horse would have paid if ai/eto work in t!'e field. 

Since there is no way to prevent spavin, curb, splint, ringbone, sprains and lameness, your thought 
should be given to the quickest, surest and most economical cure. And for over 35 years, thousands 
of horsemen have depended on Kendall's Spavin Cure. It's the old. reliable, safe remedy that has 
saved thousands of dollars' worth of horse flesh, to say nothing of the worry, time and troublt it has saved 
horse owners. You should get and keep a bottle of — 

Kendall's Spavin Cure 

for emergencies. You never can tell when you'll need it, and when horse does not need entire rest while using Kendall's Spavin 

the time does come, you'll be mighty glad you had the foresight to Cure. Light work and careful handling are better than 

prepare. Here are samples of the thousands of letters we receive standing in the barn. If the horse was in the pasture not many 

from grateful horse owners every year. Mr. J. J. Sandlin, New people would take proper care of hira. I use the Spavin Cure 

Hope, Ala., writes:— "I am a great believer in Kendall's hpavin a week at least, sometimes three, according to the severity of 

Cure. A few applications have just taken an unnatural growth off the trouble. There is enough in one bottle to cure three large 

my horse's back, thereby increasing his value $25 00 at least." Spavins if used according to directions. It is excellent for 

Mr. j. IS. McCullors, Haleysville, Ala., writes:— "Last July I bought bruises, both for man and beast. Your Spavin Cure will cure 

a mule for $65 00. He had a bad Spavin and was unable to work Thoropin in a hurry. With over twenty years' experience with 

but after using three bottles of your Spavin Cure, I cured it and this remedy I know what I say to be true. If one doubts my 

he was sold in March for $180.00. I advise all horse owners to use my word he may bring me a horse with a Dlood Spavin on one 

Kendall's Spavin Cure." And Mr. Wm. Booth, of Grovette, Ark., leg. Bone Spavin on the other and Thoropin on both and I can 

writes:— "I have cured both Blood and Bone Spavins, taking the make him a sound horse in six months. What I have done I can 

bunch all off and leaving the horse as sound as he ever was. The do again and what I have done others can do." 

Why experiment with other remedies— when you know what Kendall's has done and can do. You can get Kendall's Spavin Cure at 
any druggist's, $1.00 per bottle, 6 tor $5.00. Ask for free book. "Treatise on the Horse," or write direct to 

Dr. Bm J. Kendall Company, Enosburg Falls, Vt., U. S. Am 



Saturday, January 13, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1911 Grand American Handicap 

THE GREATEST TRAP-SHOOTING HONOR OF THE YEAR WON WITH 

PETERS SHELLS 



AT COLUMBUS, OHIO, wUNE 22, 1911 



By a Record Score, 99 out of 100 From 20 Yards 

Mr. Harvey Dixon of Oronogo, Mo., handicapped on the 20-yard line, and shooting PETERS Factory Loaded Shells, purchased by him out of the regular stock of the 2 
Columbus Gun Club, won the most coveted honor in the trap-shooting world, together with the Inter-State Association Trophy and the $1,000 purse. The score of 5 
99 from 20 yards in the Grand American has never been equaled. It pays to use PETER 8 Shells — the kind having "Steel where Steel belongs." £ 

THE PETERS GARTRID6E COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 



New Yorlti 98 Chambers St., T. H. Keller, Mgr. / 
San Francisco t G08-612 Howard St., J. S. French. Mgr. ft 
New Orleans! 321 Magazine St., ID. F. Leckert, Mgr. J 



udder. It should be allowed to run 
with the mother the first day so as to 
get the colostrum which serves to 
open up the young calf's bowels. 

After the second day at the longest 
it should be taken away, for the 
mother will learn to "hold up" the 
milk for the calf. When the calf is 
real young it should be fed the warm 
milk from the mother's udder. If the 
milk is very rich, some of the cream 
should be skimmed off and then the 
milk should be diluted with water. 



This milk should be fed to the calf 
three times a day. It is a good idea 
to feed the calf whole milk to skim 
milk, and it will take about five days 
to make the change. 

Feed it about twelve or fifteen 
pounds of skim milk per day and put 
before it all the hay the calf will eat. 
The hay will make the calf have a 
large belly but that is not objectiona- 
ble for what is needed is a good de- 
velopment of the digestive organs and 
well sprung ribs and the hay will sure- 



Get Your Stallion's Picture 

IN THE 

Breeders Special 
Number 

OF THE 

Breeder and Sportsman 

WILL BE PUBLISHED 

Saturday, March 2, 1912 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this Coast. 

IF YOU OWN A GOOD MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the 
best stallions on the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a work of 



reference. 



AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers, and those who are interested in Field Sports, it will be 
particularly valuable. 



OWNERS OF STALLIONS 



who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. Write for price 
and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco. 



ly do that. When the ration is made 
skim, a little grain, preferably corn 
meal, should be added to the skim 
milk to replace the fat that was in 
the whole milk. 



SPECIAL ADVERTISING. 



Wanted. For Sale, and Miscellaneous advertis- 
ing under this head will be set in nonpareil 
type (same type below) and will be published at 
the rate of 2 cents per word each insertion, or 6 
cents per word by the month . Count each abbre- 
viation and initial as a word. 



STUD BOOK FOR SALE. — Volumes 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Bruce's American Stud 
Book; handsomely bound; good as new. 
Will be sold cheap. Address Breeder 
and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. — Out of Rand's famous 
Mile High Kennels; Airedale puppies; 
Boston, French and English bulldogs; 
all of Hie tVst pedigreed stock in 
America. For further particulars, 
call on L,. F. Rains, <!"<> Monadnock 
Itldn., San Francisco. Phone Sutter SJ>4. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE. — Bay mare 
by Chas. Derby, first dam Josie D. by 
Joe Daniel. About 10 years old; very 
handsome; a good driver; gentle; 
afraid of nothing; a good roadster. 
Address C. H. JONES, 713 5th Ave., San 
Rafael, Cal. 

FOR SALE, CHEAP— The best bred mare 
in California. Bay filly. 3 years old; sound. 
With 6 weeks' work paced a mile in 2:20 to a 
cart and had just 2 :00 speed. Sired by Nutwood 
Wilkes: 1st dam by Bonnie Direct 2:05%; 2nd 
dam by Searchlight 2 :03M; 3rd dam by Director: 
4th dam Lida W., d.im of Nutwood Wilkes by 
Nutwood 600. Br. il by Martin Carter, Nutwood 
Stock Farm. Address T. W. BARSTOW, 1042 
Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 

FOR SALE, CHEAP— One registered 
stallion, sired by 'McKinney 2:14*4 ; 8 
years old; sound. Also one imported 
draft registered stallion; weight 1800 
pounds; 7 years old. Would consider 
trade on heavy mare or standard-bred 
mares, or fillies. Breeding and pictures 
sent to interested parties. Address D. 
A. BAKEH, Hill I*. <)., San DIeRO, Cal. 

FOR SALE. — Standard bred black 
stallion; 15.3 hands; weighs 1100. Can 
trot in 2:15; nice mannered; easy to 
drive or control; good gaited; has 
trotted quarters In 31% seconds. Is 
only 5 years old. A grand stock, race 
or matinee horse; choicely bred; dead 
game, and handsome enough for a show 
ring. Address all communications to 
K. I... Breeder and Sportsman Office. 

FOR SALE — Halley Wilkes, black 
mare by Count Wilkes 2:21; dam by 
Orator, grandson of Klectioneer. An 
ideal road mare, trots good road gait; 
paces when at speed, free legged; uses 
no boots. With one month's training 
paced quarter mile In 34% seconds, 
half mile in 1:12 on half-mile track. 
Also three and four-year-old fillies out 
of the same mare by Dictatus 2:17. For 
price and particulars address W. S. 
CLARK, Gustine Stock Farm, Gustlne, 
Cal. 

CHOICE ONES FOB SALE. — The 

six-year-old black pacing mare Cella 
K. (trial 2:10Vi, at the Stadium); no 
record; by Arner 2:17%; dam by Direct 
2:05%; second dam Carrie S., by Mam- 
brlno Wilkes. This mare stands 16.2, 
weighs about 1050; free legged; wears 
six-ounce shoes all around. Is abso- 
lutely sound and guaranteed; not afraid 
of anything; perfectly gentle, and she 
will be a 2:05 pacer this year if she 
goes Into capable hands. I will sell her 
with a proviso that she will pace in 
2:05. This Is a beautiful mare, one of 
the handsomest and best prospects in 
California. I have also a full sister to 
her, a jet black four-year-old, which 
I will also sell. She Is a strong, rugged 
mare, and will undoubtedly be as fast 
as her sister. For further particulars, 
apply to II. OLSEN, 6014 Start Four- 
teenth Streel, Oakland, Cal. 



Sunset Limited 



An entirely new luxuriously furnished, 
vacum cleaned, steel car train 

From San Francisco 6:00 p. m. Tuesdays 
and Fridays through Los Angeles and 
El Paso to New Orleans in 70 hours via 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Connecting at New Orleans with " New 
Orleans-New York Limited" for Atlanta, 
Baltimore, Washington, and New York; 
Illinois Central, Seaboard Air Line, 
Louisville & Nashville and other lines 
for St. Louis, Cincinnati, Chicago and 
Atlantic Coast Cities, as well as New Or- 
leans-New York SS Line for New York 
direct. 

Dinner service unequaled by the finest 
hotels or restaurants. Parlor observa- 
tion car with library, ladies' parlor, buf- 
fet, latest magazines and newspapers. 

Stenographer, barber, valet, shower 
bath, ladies' maid, manicure. Cour- 
teous and attentive employees. Excess 
fare $10.00. 

Write or call on our nearest agent for in- 
formation and reservations. 

The Largest Place of Its Kind West of Chioagol 



G. Lindauer 

Proprietor. 

UNION LIVERY and SALE STABLES 

Work Horses to Let. 
Country Horses for Sale. 

Horses and mules bought and sold 

122-124 Clara St., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phone Kearny 659. Home J 2643. 

Special attention paid to the purchase and 
shipment of horses and mules to foreign and 
domestic ports. 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

J. 8. Phippan 

Is now located on the A. J. Clunle 
farm, adjacent to the celebrated Palo 
Alto Farm, at Mayfleld, where he Is 
prepared to keep a few horses through 
the winter. He has fine box stalls and 
paddocks and can take the best of 
care of all sent him. He is also pre- 
pared to break colts either for city 
use or racetrack. His lifelong expe- 
rience In this branch of the business 
has fitted him to do this work care- 
fully and well. He takes pleasure In 
referring to all for whom he has ever 
worked. Address J. S. PHIPPEN, May- 
Held, Cal. 

PUBLIC TRAINING STABLE. 

DICK WILSON 
Of Plaaaanton 

Announces he will train a few good 
"prospects" for outside ownera thlB 
winter and prepare them for next sea- 
son's campaign at very reasonable 
rates. Mr. Wilson has given 16 horses 
race records of 2:10 or* better. 61 with 
records of 2:15 or better, besides giv- 
ing the double team Hedgowood Boy 
and Hady Maud C. the world's record 
to pole of 2:02%, besides winning many 
races with them. Address DICK WIL- 
SON, Race Track, I'leaaanton, Cal. 



L4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 



TWO GREAT SIRES. 



TheBondsman 

Reg. No. 37641 

8IRE OF 

Colorado E. (3) 2:04f, «m o 3 , 

the world. Winner of the Matron. American 
Horse Breeder and Kentucky Stock Farm Fu- 
turities; second in Kentucky Futurity. 

The Plunger (4) 2:07i 



old stallion of 1910. 



est 4 - year- 



Grace Bond (J) 2:09|, d ^r rboth 



risions of 



Kentucky Futurity. 

Creighton 2:08i, rc 




and 31 others. 

Half brother to Jay Hawker 2:14%, sire of Country Jay 2 :05 Vi . Susie Jay 2:06V4. 
etc. 

Half brother to The Tramp, sire of Bervaldo 2:08V4, Trampfast (2) 2:12V4. 
Half brother to Sorrento Todd (4) 2:1414, Belle Sentinel 2:15, etc. 



BARON WII.KES 2:1S. . 

Sire of 12 in 2:10, in- 
cluding Bumps 2:03«4, 
Rubenstein 2:05. Bar- 
on May 2:07V4: sired 
dams of 4 in 2:10. 



GEORGE WII.KES 2:22 

Sire of 83, dams of 204. 



BELLE PATC1IE\2:30% 

In great brood mare list. 



SORHEXTO 

Dam of Jay Hawker 
2:14%, Sorrento Todd 
(4) 2:14»4. Belle Sen- 
tinel 2:15, Eola 2:19%, 
Lazv Bird 2:26%, Ted- 
dy Sentinel. 2:29%, The 
Tramp (sire), etc. 

4th dam Vlrgle — by Abdallah 15. 

5th dam Lucy — by Highlander (Veech's) 



GRAND SENTINEL 
2:2i)i4 

Sire of 23, including Nel- 
lette 2:16%, Tosca 
2:18%. 



EMPRESS 

Dam of 2 and grandam 
of 9. 



HAMDI.ETONIAN 10 

Sire of 40. 
DOLLY SPANKER 

Dam of 1. 
MAMBRINO PATCHEN 
58. 

Sire of 25. dams of 162. 
SALLY CHORISTER 
By Mamb. Chorister, 
dam of 2 In 2:20. etc. 
SENTINEL 280 

Sire of 8 in list. 
MAID OF LEXINGTON 

By Mamb. Pilot 29. 
ABDALLAH MAMBRINO 

Sire of 15, dams of 42. 
BIG ELLEN 

By Clark Chief. 



THE BONDSMAN is the only stallion that sired three new 2:10 performers 
with race records in 1910. In spite of the fact that he has no record, The Bonds- 
man was a colt trotter of great merit. He was a contending colt all through the 
Kentucky Futurity of 1899. getting third money. This was a six-heat race and was 
won by Boralma. As a four-year-old he was not raced, but trotted a public trial 
In 2:11. As a sire he is destined to be ths leading son of the great Baron Wilkes, 
founder of the greatest futurity winning family. 

He will make the season of 1912 at 



Pleasanton Training Park. $100 



the Season with usual 
return privilege 1913. 
Season ends June 1st. 



THE PATCHEN BOY 39033 

Three-Year-Old Record 2:10 3 , In a Winning Race. 

Sired by the Great WILKES BOY 3803, sire of 107 in standard time. 
A Genuine Raca Horse and a Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 



The Patchen Boy 39033 is sire of the following: 



Francis J 

Evelyn Patchen. 
Scott Patchen 
Dessle Patchen . 
Frank Patchen 
Ruby Patchen 
J. C. Patchen . . . 



.2:08 Legal Patchen ...2:15% 

.2:10% Luclle Patchen ..2:16 

.2:12% Jerrv Patchen ...2:16% 

.2:13 Knightstown Belle2:16% 

.2:13% Alec Williams ...2:18% 

.2:13% Lois Patchen 2:19% 

.2:14% Auduous the Mlller2:19% 



Dorothy C 2:19% 

Louise Patchen ...2:19% 

Dr. Warren 2:19% 

Roscoe Binning ..2:20 

Mary Patchen 2:20% 

Black Patchen ..2:20% 
and 11 others in 2:30. 



Dam Lndy Clnv, the dam of The Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%, C. W. M. 2:24% 
(trotted to high wheels), Anglin Wilkes 2:16% over half-mile track, trial 2:09%, 
by Metropolitan 1372, son of Hambletonian 10; second dam. Haggie Brown, by 
Ashland Clay; third dam, Pitty Pat, thoroughbred. The Patchen Boy was the 
greatest three-year-old race colt in the world, winning six straight races in the 
Grand Circuit the only year he was raced. His produce are good-headed and real 
race horses. (No tin cups.) 

THE PATCHEN BOY is a beautiful black, 16.1 hands and weighs 1290 pounds. 
His colts are of fine size, great individuals and the kind that sell for the high 
dollar. 



Season of 1912 at Pleasanton Training Park. Fee: 



$50 



privilege 1913 



Both of the Above Horses Will Remain in California. 

Best of care and attention given mares, but no responsibility assumed for 
accidents. Good pasturage at reasonable rates. For further particulars and full 
tabulated pedigree, address 

WILLIAM J. WILSON, Manager, Pleasanton, Col. 
A Choice Collection of Kentucky Saddle Horse* for Sale. 




WM, HAROLD 2:13 



4 By Sidney 2:19' 

Dam 

4 Cricket 2:10 



Sire of Frank N. 2:07%. Janice 2:0% The Iceman 2:10. etc. 

Season 1912. $5 at first service: $20 when mare proves 
with foal. 

Apply or address 

JAS. O. JOHNSTONE, 

Elmhurst, Alameda Co.. Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

(Typewritten, Suitsble for Framing. 

Registration of Standard-Bred Horses Attended to. 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and terms on first page; complete tabulated 
pedigree on the two inside pages and description on back page. 

Stallion Cards 

Two sides, size 3% x to fit envelope. 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

Size, one-half sheet, 14 x 22; size, one-third sheet, .11 x 14. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1. 

Address, BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

366 Pacific Bldg., San Francisco 



Clean-Polish 



MS-ONE oil Immediately 
removes stains, spots and 
scars from piano cases and 
all fine furniture. It restores 
the orltlnal lustre and a 
bright lastlni finish. Jnst 
a (entle rub with a rag 
moistened with 3-IN-OHE and 
any varnished or veneered 
surface Dili shine like Dew. 
Contains do (rease or acid to 
soil or Injure; has no dis- 
agreeable varnish odor. Try 
It at oar expense. 

FPFF Vr " e at oncc - Clvt Damt your 
r RLiLj d ta i er . Get a sample bottle and 

"the new may" to polish pianos absolutely free. 

A library slip packed with every bottle. 

I'3-IN-ONE OIL CO.. 102 New St. 

New York City. 





FOR SALE OR LEASE 



The Standard-Bred Trotting Stallion 

UNIMAK 40936 

(Full brother to Sterling McKinney 
2:06%.) 

Sired by McKinney 2:11 Vi, dam 
Twenty-third by Director 2:17; second 
dam Nettie Nutwood (dam of Hills- 
dale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%; third 
dam by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903; fourth 
dam by Williamson's Belmont. 

Unimak is a beautiful seal brown; 
stands 16.1 hands, and weighs 1250. He 
is one of the finest-looking, best-bred 
and best-gaited trotters on this Coast. 
His disposition is perfect. For terms 
and other information, apply to this 
office. 



HOMEPHONE PRAISED. 

A new subscriber writes the Home 
Telephone Company under date of Oc- 
tober 28, 1911: 

"Please install a phone at my home. 
I did not know anything about the good 
points of the Homephone and was 
rather prejudiced against it until I be- 
gan using it in my office. I use it all 
the time now, not only in phoning 
around the building, but getting outside 
numbers, because it saves me time and 
trouble. The Homephone delivers the 
goods. 

"You know the burners of candles 
rioted in London about 500 years ago 
when gas was introduced. Most of us 
object to changes. Possibly that is the 
reason why 1 am so late in ordering a 
Homephone." 

BAY CITIES 
HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 
333 Grant Ave.. San Francisco. 



SMITH'S WONDER WORKER 

Registered 




Trads Mark 

Endorsed by Horsemen the world over a9 the 
BEST remedy for Bowed. Strained and Rup- 
tured Tendons. Weak Joints. Cording Up. Buck 
Shins. Shoulder. Hip and Stifle Lameness and 
Rheumatism. As a Leg and Body Wash it has 
no equal, tl per bottle prepaid, $16 per dozen, 
$10 per gallon F. <). B. Tiffin. At all harness- 
makors and druggists. W. K. SMITH. Tiffin. 
Ohio. 

WM. E. DETELS, 

Pacific Coast Agent. Pleasanton. Cal. 



Pedigrees 

TRACED AND TADDLATED 



Stock Farm 

Catalogues Compiled, 
Registration Attended To. 

Prices Reasonable. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

P. O. Drawer 447. San Franciaco 

GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Marin snore at 
Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing Tackle to let and 
Bait always on hand. First-claas boats at rses 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat House, 
Capt. Y. Wm. Ehrkk. Prop., Tiburon. Oal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market Bt . 



MM 

HOTEL 

ENTIRXLY REBUILT 
J1NCE THE FIRE 

Far famed and first 
named wherever good 
hotels are mentioned. 

Recognized as the headquarter or 
the businessmen of the world. 
The place where you always find 
your friends. 

European plan only. 

Management 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

M FRANCISCO 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases ot veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonaoie prloes 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

610 Ootavla St., between Fulton and Grove 
Phone Market 2074. San Franoieeo, Cal. 

WM. F. EGAN. M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1155 Colden Oat* Av. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster ana chestnu 
Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

trains 
for 
Business 
and places 
it* graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 
425 M0ALLI8TER ST., 

San Franciico. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealers In PAPER 

37-1 st St., San Franoisoo, Csl. 

Blake. Moffit & Towne. Los Angelas. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland. Ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art In 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artistic Designing 
121 Sscond St., San Pranoisco 



ABSOBBIN1 



Removes Bursal Enlargements, 
Thickened, Swollen TLnirs, 
Curbs, Filled Tendons, Soreness 
from any Braise or Strain; Cures 
Spavin Lameness, Allays fain. 
mm- mrm Does not Blister, remove the hair 
luP=jtif or lay up the horse. S2.0O a 
Borore Arter bottle, delivered Hook 1 E free. 

ABSORBINE, JR.. liniment for mankind. For 
Synovitis, Strains. Gouty or ltheumauc Deposits, 
Swollen, Painful Vuncose Veins. Allays I'aln. 
Will tell you more If you write fl and 12 per bottle 
at dealers or delivered. Manufactured only tt 
W.F.YOUNG, P.O. F. 54 Temple Si., Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Langley A Michaels, San Francisco, Calif.; 
Woodward. Clark a Co., Portland. On.: F. W. Brans Co., 
Broniwlg Drug Co., Western Wholesale Drag Co., Loi An- 
galei. Calif.; Kirk, Cleary 4 Co., Sacramento. Calif.; Pacific 
Drag Co., Seattle, Wash., Spokane Draj* ;o., Spokane, Waah. 

Coffin, Redington Co.. San Francisco. Cal. 




Saturday, January 13, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



16 



The Man Who has Come Back. 

The host of admirers of what the veteran war horse of the shooting game — The 
Hon. T. Bill Crosby — has done lately with his 34-inch barrel Parker gun, will be 
glad to read the following, viz: 

In the Eastern Handicap 100 out of 100 targets. 

In the Western Handicap . 492 out of 500 targets. 

In Evansville, Ind., Tournament 395 out of 400 targets. 



Making a continuous run of 987 out of 1000 targets 

The only straight score ever recorded in the Grand American Handicap 

event was made with a Parker gun, scoring 100 out of 100 at 19 yards rise. Further- 
more the same Old Reliable has won the National Championship of America 

every year it has been shot for. 

For information regarding small bore guns, address the pioneer makers of the 



20 gauge 

PARKER BROS., 



Meriden, Conn. 



N. Y. Salesrooms. 32 Warren Street. 

Resident Agent: A. W. du Bray, P. O. Box 102, San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
«P OUTFITTERS 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER 4 .! 
ATHLETE. 



48-52 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
*1° APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



"IDEAL" 



All that the name implies 



The Perfect Marine Gas Engine 



SIMPLICITY 



RELIABILITY 



STRENGTH.... 




FOUR CYCLE 



4 TO 40 



HORSEPOWER 



SHOWING PORT SIDE — 16 h. p. 

EVERY ENGINE GUARANTEED. 

No freak features, but every part perfected along the most approved 

lines. 

SOME ADVANTAGES OP THE "IDEAL." 

All Parts Easily Accessible. 
Expansion Chamber Between Cylinders. 
Exhaust Manifold at Bottom of Cylinders. 
Mechanical Force Feed Lubrication. 
Compound Bronze and Babbitt Dovetailed Bearings. 
Perfect Ignition System and Perfect Timing. 
Absolute Control at All Speeds. 
Noise and Vibration Reduced to a Minimum. 
All Sittings Highest Grade for Salt Water. 

The Most Power and the Least Fuss. 

Send for Catalogue and you will know more. 
IDEAL CAS ENGINE, Wollaston, Mass. 

PORT SIDE — 4h. p. California Agency : 36C Pacific Bldg. San Francisco. Cal. 




ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 



Phone Kearny 2030. 



403 Battery St, San Francisco, Cal. 




TALLION OWNER 

If In need of anything In the lino of Stallion Cards, complied and 

E Tinted, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Books 
talllon Sorvlce Books, Horse Cuts In stock and made from photos. 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, Prrgnators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 



MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 



358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. . 

• — ~xmm* — 



S RESULT OF OVER A CENTURY'S EXPERIENCE. 




Perfection in powder-making is only achieved by exerci.sinj,' the most 
scrupulous care in the selection and preparation of raw materials, employing 
skilled workmen exclusively, and using only the most improved modern me- 
chanical equipment. 



This is the QyJJJONj) method and accounts for the unequaled reputation 

among sportsmen enjoyed by the (^QjDffD brands of 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

One of the most popular of these brands is 




A dense powder that is absolutely uniform in velocity and pattern. Water- 
proof — not affected by extremes of heat or cold. " Infallible" SMOKELESS 
SHOTGUN POWDER will not pit the gun barrels. 

Unequaled for Field and Trap-Shooting. 

See that your shells are loaded with INFALLIBLE. 

Send to-day for Infallible Booklet No. 99. It gives best loads for various kinds of game 
and other information of value to shooters. It's free. 

DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 

Pioneer Powder Makers of America. Wilmington, Del. 



E. 

Established 1802. 



GOLCHER BROS. 



Camping 
Goods. 




Fishing 
Tackle. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 

510 Market St., San Francisco 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Of San Francisco 



CAPITAL 
$3,000,000.00. 
SURPLUS AND PROFITS 
$1,500,000,00. 




Rudolph Spreckels. Pres. 
James K. Lynch, VIce-Pres. 
J. & Moffltt. Cashier. 



issssssii ::!!!•! 




Offers adequate banking 
service to mercantile firms, 
business men, professional 
men and banks. 



Post and Montgomery 



J. H. Skinner. Assistant-Cashier 
C. H. McCormlck, " 
(leo. A. Kennedy, 




Take Bt In 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
•act promptly, you will find that there Is nothing In 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, WlndpufTs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1912. 




Five shots all under absolute control — three to get the cripples. The action is simple, powerful and sure. 
The trigger pull is smooth and easy. The hammer is light and quick. Part of the recoil ordinarily absorbed by the shooter's shoul- 
der is utilized to operate the mechanism. Not one single ounce of muzzle energy is lost. Handles the heaviest loads with ease and 
safety. Solid breech, hammerless, safe. 



Peming tortrUMC —the perfect shooting combination. 

\ 



REMINGTON -ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY, 



299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 




WINCHESTER 

Repeating Rifles the Hunter's Choice. 

Winchester Repeating Rifles have been the favorite hunting rifles for decades, and 
with the introduction of new models from time to time to keep pace with dis- 
coveries and improvements in firearms and powders, they have remained first in 
the esteem of experienced hunters. There is a Winchester repeater for every kind 
of shooting; and whether you wish a little .22 Caliber or a big .405 or .50-110 for 
the largest game, you will find your requirements best met by a Winchester. 
Don't overlook the Winchester Self- Loading Rifles, which are made in cal- 
ibers from .22 to .401, suitable for all kinds of hunting. These rifles are 
simple and reliable in action and exceedingly rapid and accurate in shooting. 

Send for large illustrated eatalogne. It's free. 
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., - - NEW HAVEN, CONN. 




LOADS 

the 1911 WINNERS! 

Unequaled for VELOCITY, PATTERN and PENETRATION, SELBY LOADS have 
enabled AMATEURS TO WIN CONSISTENTLY at every 
shoot on the Pacific Coast in I9II. 




SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., San Francisco. 



LOADS ARE 

Loaded on the Pacific Coast. 

ALWAYS FRESH, ALWAYS RELIABLE, BACKED BY THE SELBY GUARANTEE. 

Special Loads at a Moment's Notice. 



VOLUME LX. No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1912. 



Subscription— ?3.00 Per Yeat 





t&c 

f HIGH TEST 

OIL 

HIGHEST GRADE 

PENNSYLVANIA OIL 

MANUFACTURED CXPMSSLY FOR 



WHITTIERCOBURNCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



■I 

A 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 



Perm. 150° Test. 49° Grav. 



Argo Coal Oil 

SAFEST FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Absolutely Sweet, Water White, Glean, Highest Test Oil 

NO SMOKE-ODORLESS. 

MANUFACTURED EXPRESSLY FOR 

Whittier - Coburn Company 



301 Howard St., 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Write for 
Nearest Dealer. 



443 So. Los Angeles St., 
LOS ANGELES. 



MT. DIABLO CEMENT 

bast for foundations, dairy floors, fruit dryer floors, etc. etc. 

SANTA CRUZ LIME 

best for bricklaying and plastering. 

MT. DIABLO LIME 

best for spraying and whitewashing. 
WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICES ON ALL BUILDING MATERIAL. 

HENRY COWELL LIME & CEMENT COMPANY 

9 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



$ 5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



THE 



State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 4 

Foals of Marea Covered in 1911 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$ 5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



$2,850 for Trotting Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



$2,150 for Pacing Foals. 



California State Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE FEBRUARY 1, '12. 



MOMJV DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS : 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

For Two- Year-Olds to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1914. 

Two-Year-Old Trotters $600 

Two-Year-Old Pacers 400 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started in above and won no money. 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

For Three-Year-Olds to Take Place at the California State Pair, 1915. 

Three-Year-Old Trotters $1400 

Three-Year-Old Pacers 1100 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started In above and won no money. 



Two-Year-Old Trotters 
Two-Year-Old Pacers 



ENTRANCE FREE — Otherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

$350 I Three-Year-Old Trotters 
250 Three-Year-Old Pacers . . 



$400 
300 



ENTRANCE \\D PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1, 1912, when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1912, 
$5 December 1, 1912; $10 on yearlings February 1. 1913; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1914; $10 on three-years-olds February 1, 1915. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace. $25 to start in the two-year-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pace; $50 to start In the 
three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair at which the race Is to take place. 

No additional entrance villi he charged in the Consolation Stakea. 

Nominators: mnst designate when making payments to start whether the home entered In a Trotter or Paeer. 
toils that Ntart at two years old are aot harred from starting again In the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITIONS. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats 2 In 3, and for three-year-olds, 3 in 5. Distance for two-year-olds, 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 100 yards. 

II a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or tninx, or If either the mare or foal dies before February 1, 11)13, her nominator may sell or traawfer hi* 

nomination <>r anbatltute : I her mare or foal, regardless of onnrrNhip; hut there will he no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 

paid in or contracted for. In culrics, the mime, eolor nnd pedigree of mare must be given: also the name of the horde to which nlie nun bred la 1011. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5000, the amount of the 

guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacng divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received Is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the third heat. 
Races for Three- Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the fifth heat. 

Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25. 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat In three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown by the 

summary. 

Entries open to the world. 

Write for Entry Blanks to 

V. I.. SCOTT, President. C. ALLISON TEI.FER, Manager, Sacramento, Cal. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank, rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 
Breeder and Sportsman 



Advertise in the Breeder and Sportsman 



Saturday, January 20, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sporting Authority of th* Paeifle Coaet. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday, 
r. W. KELLEY. Proprietor. 



OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

National Newspaper Bureau Agent. 219 East 23rd St., New York City 
Entered as Sacond Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Offlca. 

Terms— On* Year. f3; Six Months, $1.75; Three Months. |l. 
Foreign postage $1 per year additional ; Canadian postage 50c 
per year additional. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Po9tal Order, draft or registered letter 
•ddressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447, 8an Francisco, Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



THE Stallion Registration Law which went into 
effect August 1st, 1911, is published in full in this 
issue. Its importance as a measure to prevent un- 
scrupulous horse owners from standing stallions un- 
der fictitious pedigrees cannot be overestimated. 
For many years there were men who would "patch 
up a pedigree" to suit any owner's desires, and, un- 
der the false statements made, many owners of good 
mares were tempted to breed to them. In after years 
it was learned that the pedigrees as printed on the 
stallion cards were fraudulent, but there was no 
legal redress. Of late, however, thanks to the trot- 
ting horse publications and the vigilance of the sec- 
retaries of the various draft horse organizations, 
this nefarious work has been checked; but that 
is no reason why there are not other rascals ready 
to "manufacture suitable pedigrees." To prevent 
this class from committing this crime this new reg- 
istration law to regulate the public service of stal- 
lions and jacks in California was passed by the last 
Legislature. 

It is an excellent law for another reason, it sets 
forth that all horses standing for public service in this 
State must be licensed, and they must be advertised 
with their license number affixed to the description. 
Stallions must also be classified and defined as 
"pure bred," "standard bred," "grade," "cross-bred," 
"non-standard," or "mongrel," and it shall be illegal 
to print or advertise any misleading reference to 
the breeding of any stallion cr jack, his dam or his 
sire. 

Another provision of this law which should meet 
with the approval of horsemen is, that every stal- 
lion or jack, for which an application for a license 
is made, must pass a most rigid veterinary exami- 
nation and any diseases, either transmissible or 
hereditary, as specified in the act, if found to exist 
in the stallion of jack, will be sufficient for a dis- 
qualification and the refusal of a license. The law 
is very explicit on this point, and, when one stops 
to consider what a disastrous effect the spread of 
these diseases (which are too common now) must 
have upon future generations of horses the won- 
der is that such a law enacted and enforced many 
years ago. 

There are many of the States in America that have 
adopted similar registration license laws, and horse- 
men claim that the majority of colts and fillies in 
these places are remarkably free from disease and 
command higher prices than those bred where such 
laws are not in existence. In France, Germany, Aus- 
tria, Russia, and Italy, the Government supervises 
the horse-breeding industry, consequently horses bred 
in these countries are noted for their soundness and 
freedom from disease; all unsound ones being de- 
stroyed. 

The tit'es "pure bred," "non standard," and "mon- 
grel," which confronts trotting horse breeders in this 
law may seem very difficult to abide by, and many 
owners of horses which are "non-standard" will 
hesitate about advertising them as such. This is not 
right, they should not look upon it in that way, for 
evidently the makers of this law did not understand 
the technical phrases of horse breeding. It is fool- 
ish to construe "pure bred" as only meaning a horse 
that is registered with the American Trotting Regis- 
ter Association, as some of the best and purest bred 
horses in the world, with the longest pedigrees, and 
holding some of the fastest records, including Uhlan 
l:59i/4, Charley D. 2:06%, Aerolite 2:07Vfe, etc., can- 
not be registered under the present requirements 
of the Trotting Register Association. The rules have 
been changed a number of times since the Register 
was established. It would have been more sensible 
had they classified trotting and pacing horses as 



"standard and registered," "trotting bred" and "non- 
standard" and not used the words "pure bred" which 
is misleading to the uninformed public. The words 
"pure bred' as used by breeders, relates more par- 
ticularly to cattle, sheep, hogs and other livestock 
than it does to horses. 

The reason why these horses are termed "non- 
standard" is that their sires were not "standard" and 
registered horses or that some of their dams were 
not registered when the laws of registration were 
more lax than at present. The name "standard" is, 
in a great measure, losing its significance, because 
many grandly-bred hcrses and mares that came un- 
der its caption have never earned a 2: HO record, or 
never sired or produced a 2:30 performer, neither 
have their progeny been noted as progenitors of 
standard speed. The sire and dam of any horse with 
a record, if they have never been registered, pre- 
vents their produce from attaining that honor. Some 
of our campaigners have earned low records in the 
hardest of turf battles, yet their dams may trace to 
some thoroughbred mare or some mare whose pedi- 
gree is untraced, hence they would be "non-standard." 
Performers of this kind should be favorably consid- 
ered by breeders, especially, if the holder of the 
record has al' the other requisites. 

Following is a list of stallions that were licensed 
by the California Stallion Registration Board to and 
including January 10, 1912: 

Major Domo, John V. Grimes Lockford 

E. G. Diablo, J. R. Balkwill Parlier 

Guy Borden. P. L. Aguirre Hanford 

Unique, Gordon R. Parker Santa Cruz 

Pathro, Solomon Shoekley Merced 

Lijero, P. E. Wright Sacramento 

Modesto Mac, John H. Dirst Modesto 

Don Sonoma, J. J. Summerfield Santa Rosa 

Royal Envoy, John Campbell Tulare 

Nearest McKinney, T. W. Barstow San Jose 

Scott McKinney, Dr. M. Schaltenbrandt . . San Francisco 

Reflector, A. D. Fischer Hughson 

Arthur Wayland, A. J. Kirkpatrick Orland 

Lyn Kinney, P. Grein Chico 

Ingoma, Gravatt & Co Hanford 

Dexter Prince, Jr., J. W. Dunlap Trwin 

McVerde, J. W. Hitch Somis 

Woodlock, I. M. Lipson Tulare 

Black Wilkes, W. H. Mitchell Tulare 

Dexter Derby, F. A. & P. W. Groom Stockton 

Aimond Lou, Hemet Stock Farm Hemet 

Geo. W. McKinney, Hemet Stock Farm Hemet 

Wilbur Lou, Hemet Stock Farm Hemet 

Kinney De Lopez, Hemet Stock Farm Hemet 

Best Policy, R. O. Newman Visalia 

Jacob F., Peter Frisch Fresno 

Zomblue, E. D. Waffle Santa Ana 

Hazlenutt, Hugh Morgan Tulare 

Star Direct, Hugh Morgan Tulare 

Joe Locke, Henry Delaney Ventura 

El tier, Henry Delaney Ventura 

Kinney Rose, Henry Delaney Ventura 

McAdrian, E. D. Diggs Stockton 

Doble Lou, Geo. W. Martin San Jose 

Prince Don, G. W. Watson Napa Junction 

o 

THE ravages of that destructive insect pest, the 
Mediterranean fly, wherever it has appeared, are 
so vast that the United States Government should 
pass the most drastic laws to prevent consignors of 
all fruit subject to the attacks of this fly from ship- 
ping it to America, and adopt the most stringent 
treasures to prevent passengers from bringing it 
into any port. In places where this fly is known to 
exist the newspapers should be subsidized to wage a 
ceaseless battle against such offending corporations 
or individuals. On every steamship and sailing ves- 
sel placards containing the warnings and penalties 
for infraction of the law should be displayed in the 
most conspicuous places, and also be plainly printed 
in German, French, Italian, and the native language 
used in the port whence the vessel sails. The 
transportation companies whose officers and em- 
ployes are negligent or lax in the handling of the 
investigation business should be held liable for heavy 
damages, and all passengers be compelled to sign 
affidavits that they have no specified "contraband" 
fruits, if steps cannot be taken immediately to search 
their baggage at such ports. If a passenger or an 
employe should make a false report on arrival at any 
port In the United States he or she should be heavily 
fined or imprisoned. The dangers resulting from the 
invasion of this fly into California can never be esti- 
mated. If it was a pest that could be annihilated by 
chemicals, acids, or by the introduction of other in- 
sects, the danger would not be so great, but it a|>- 
pears these flies are not affected by climatic changes 
or the usual insecticides (liquid or dry) but seem to 
flourish and multiply upon Paris green, sulphur, 
lime, potash and all other powerful and poisonous 
preparations. This is a vital question and should 



receive the attention of the proper authorities, and 
every newspaper in the United States must use 
its influence by giving this subject a'l the publicity 
possible. 

IT WILL be exceedingly gratifying to everyone 
interested in the light harness horse industry to 
learn that there were ninety-eight entries made in 
the Occident Stake (for foals of 1911) to be de- 
eded at the State Fair in 1914. This is just thirty- 
four more than was sent in last year and is the best 
( vidence in the world that the interest in trotting 
and pacing in California is on the increase. A care- 
ful study of the sires and dams of these foals is an 
< hject lesson for progressive breeders, and it is no 
idle boast to say that in this list there are many 
that will be 2:10 or better performers, and the ma- 
jority will get in the standard list. 

IN THE State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 4, for foals 
of mares covered in 1911, the produce to trot and 
pace at two and three years old, entries will close 
Thursday, February 1st, with C. Allison Telfer, man- 
ager, Sacramento. There is not an owner of a mare 
bred last year who can afford to leave this stake 
out of his list of engagements fcr that prospective 
foal. The payments are very easy and reasonable 
and it is for a $5000 guaranteed stake. 

THE dawning of a new era in all that pertains to 
the trotting horse industry of the whole Pacific Coast 
was duly celebrated at the meeting held in this city 
on Thursday; for further particulars read the article, 
"Pacific Coast Circuit Arranged," as published in 
this issue. The "Breeder and Sportsman" congratu- 
lates everyone connected with it for their enthusiasm 
and determination to give at least fifteen weeks of 
racing and perhaps more in 1912. 

CHANGES AT THE HOME OF DAN PATCH 1:55. 



M. W. Savage, the proprietor of the International 
Stock Food Farm writes: 

"Ned McCarr has been advanced to head trainer. 
McCarr has been assistant trainer on my farm for 
about two years and has thoroughly proven his abil- 
ity by developing the wonderful speed of my sensa- 
tional two-year-old, Dazzle Patch, and the excep- 
tional speed of Liberty Patch, two-year-old Dan 
Patch colt, — dam Effie Powers. He has also been 
very successful in developing many of my other 
colts, including Princess Patch, winner at Spring- 
field last fall and the three-year-old trotting filly Mary 
E. Patch, that was second to Jack Swift in 2:10V 2 
at Milwaukee. He also drove my four-year-old, Pearl 
Patch, a mile in 2:04 last fall. McCarr also trained 
Hedgewood Boy 2:01 in 1910 and 1911 and George 
Gano 2:02 last spring and summer, and every horse- 
man knows what Hedgewood Boy did in 1910 and 
what George Gano did last year and the splendid 
physical condition of both horses. 

"I make the prediction now that McCarr wisU put 
George Gano in the 2:00 list before the close ori912, 
and that he will also train and drive Minor Heir and 
George Gano to the world's team record this year; 
and I would not be surprised if he put the double 
record right at 2:00. I am basing this only after 
carefully watching his every day training all last 
summer. I give you these facts so that you will real- 
ize that I am expecting my farm to show still greater 
results than it has ever done in the past. 

"Dr. Jack Seiter will have charge of my shoeing 
department which will insure first-class work being 
done in this very important branch of the business. 
You, of course, known of his abality atid wide experi- 
ence in shoeing the harness horse. 

"C. W. Moseley will act as secretary of the farm 
and his many years' of successful work in this line 
specially qualify him as a dependable secretary for 
my farm." 

Of Clifton Pilot, sire of Kate Bradley, dam oi 
Charley Wilkes 2:21%, sire of Carlotta Wilkes (dam 
of Carolkin 2:07%, Vollta 2 : 1 5 14 , etc.), Jos. Cairn 
Simpson wrote in 1895: "I owned Clifton Pilot. I 
bought him of M. S. Patrick, then living in Chicago, 
and sold him to C. A. Voght, of Iowa City. Some 
of the turf papers claim that the dam of Clifton 
Pilot was untraced, but I feel sure that is an error. 
He was bred in Kentucky and my impression is that 
Mr. Patrick bought him pf his breeder. At all events, 
he got the pedigree with the horse which he gave 
ire, and I turned It over to Mr. Voght. According 
to my recollection, Clifton Pilot was by Pilot Jr. 12, 
out of a mare by Whip Comet, grandam said to be 
of Messenger blood. C. S. Dole, of Chicago, had a 
mare called Bacchante Mambrino, which I think was 
from the same mare as Clifton Pilot or the sister 
of Clifton Pilot's dam." I This mare Bacchante Mam- 
brino was the dam of Kitty Lewis (dam of Bob 
S pragUe 2:24%) and she was out of Grey Bacchante, 
whose dam was by Whip Comet out of a mare said 
to be by Messenger, and was owned by R. A. Alex- 
ander, who sold her daughter, Bacchante Mambrino, 
to C. S. Dale of Chicago. The probabilities are that 
Clifton Pilot and Grey Bacchante were half brother 
and sister. — Ed.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 



THE GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY IS HERE. 



If, in May, 1906, one had predicted that in less than 
six years there would be a greater interest taken in 
San Francisco than there was then, and that it would 
be the pivotal point to which the people From all 
parts of the world would center their thoughts, the 
prophet would be looked upon as demented. At that 
time the entire business center and one-half of the 
residential section were in ashes and the inhabitants 
weie endeavoring to see their way clear to rebuild 
the city they loved. The spirit of determination 
and courage which pervaded the entire community 
was so remarkable for its aggressive strength and 
undaunted power that even to this day it is a source 
of wonderment to all who realize what was accom- 
plished by it. The work of tearing down dangerous 
walls, clearing away debris and hauling the thou- 
sands of tons of this waste material bo make new 
kind along the shores of the Bay of San Francisco 
gave employment to thousands of men and horses. 
These were also employed in bringing in building 
materials of all kinds from railroads and wharves. 
The work of rehabilitation continued until rows of 
modern fireprooof buildings and magnificent sky- 
scrapers replaced the old wooden houses which were 
c'estroyed. There was much to he accomplished and 
the wonder of it all is that so much was done so well. 
Every month since, millions have been spent in build- 
ings of the finest class, until San Francisco is con- 
sidered to have a greater proportion of absolutely 
safe structures for the number erected of any city in 
the civilized world. 

Three years ago there were scores of these build- 
ings untenanted and business of all kinds came to a 
standstill. Even building operations, in a great meas- 
ure, ceased. San Francisco was struggling with its 
exposures of boodling Supervisors, graft trials, and 
bribery cases. Then a new political power came into 
office and "gloom" settled like a pall upon many 
capitalists and business men who felt that they were 
powerless to resist the increased taxation that would 
follow this new administration; they decided not to 
build cr loan money upon any vacant property, hence 
dull times followed. 

About two years ago the Chamber of Commerce 
and most of our leading bankers saw this condition 
of things. They decided, that to revive a greater 
interest in San Francisco and instill confidence in the 
minds of all who were struggling against great odds, 
that something should be done toward holding a 
world's exposition here at the time of the completion 
of the Panama Canal. The idea took root like good 
seed on fertile soil. The daily and weekly press took 
the work up and immediately enlisted the attention 
of the general public by paving the way for making 
a campaign tor it. Everybody in America knows how 
vigorously that battle was fought and won, and that 
the enormous sum of $25,000,000 was subscribed to 
carry this great undertaking on. 

In 1911 we had another election, and those who 
were elected to take charge of the affairs of this 
municipality then are men noted for their strong 
business principles, integrity, ability, optimism and 
"determination to do things." They are workng 
shoulder to shoulder with every organization for the 
tctterment of this city and for its advancement, while 
h( Iping the Panama-Pacific Exposition Committee to 
carry out its stupendous task. 

Since this election, our architects have been busy 
lianning and designing homes, fine buildings, and 
li tels find apartment houses on the acres of vacant 
lind in the burnt district. The seventy thousand men 
with their families who once occupied the most beau- 
tiful residences near the center of our city moved 
shortly after the disaster to Oakland, Berkeley, Ala- 
meda, and other bay cities, or down the peninsula as 
iar as Redwood City, or out toward the Golden Gate. 
They want to "come back," and, as fast as suitable 
buildings are erected for them, they will. This is 
only one of the many building operations contem- 
plated, although it means the expenditure of immense 
sums of money during the next three years. 

The United States Government buildings, sub- 
treasury, and others, will be started in a few months; 
then there are scores of other large business build- 
ings, the foundations for which will soon be laid. The 
( lection of an immense railroad depot with its miles 
of track stretching out in all directions will also be 
finished before 191"). A new City Hall in our civic 
center, with a great auditorium building, an opera 
house, library, and other buildings built on a scale of 
grandeur in keeping with the class of buildings al- 
i eady erected in this city, will soon be started. To 
get sufficient ground to make this civic center second 
to no other in America considerable land already 
covered with buildings will have to be purchased and 
the buildings thereon razed. 

Besides these improvements involving the expendi- 
ture of many millions, tunnels are to be made through 
several of cur steepest hills, thus shortening the dis- 
tance to be traveled by thousands who live in densely 
populated sections but have business in our city. 
Many hills are to be graded and leveled, the material 
from them to be used to fill in part of the seven miles 
of cemented bulkhead along the shores of our beau- 
tiful bay. The ferry depot is to be enlarged and cur 
wharfage facilities increased to afford room for 
the large number of vessels that will enter this port 
for all time to come. Nine millions of dollars have 
been appropriated for harbor work alone. 

New streets, railways, sewers, and immense reser- 
voirs are to be built. Our great water supply system 
is to be purchased and vast sums of money will be 
used in enlarging it to meet the demands of this city 
and suburban cities. Schools, churches and lodge 
buildings are to be erected and new parks laid out; 
many boulevards will be made and beautified with 



ornamental trees; and, in fact, San Francisco from 
San Mateo to Black Point, and from the Bay to the 
Pacific Ocean, will be put in perfect order before the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition throws open its gates to 
the world. 

The $25,000,000 set aside for this latter undertak- 
ing is said by conservative men to be just about one- 
fourth of the amount that will actually be expended 
by the time all the buildings and surrounding im- 
provements are finished. Almost every nation and 
country on the globe will have its building, represen- 
tative of its architecture, to hold the exhibits sent. 
The Exposition Committee has commissioned many 
representatives to go around the world provided with 
literature to arouse an interest in it. These mis- 
sionaries report that everywhere they visited their 
receptions were most cordial and the people have 
manifested their desire and determination to have 
exhibits of their best productions shown in buildings 
they will construct. Some are asking for space. The 
( hinese Government desires forty acres. 

The Exposition fever on this Coast is spreading 
like an epidemic and its effects are being felt in all 
our cities, towns and villages. Companies are being 
incorporated to harness our rivers and mountain 
streams for the purpose of supplying electricity for 
the demand they know must come. Interurban elec- 
tric lines are being built and extended into our re- 
motest valleys; rivers are being widened and dredged; 
lateral canals built and dams constructed to save the 
waters for irrigating purposes. Wells are being sunk 
for oil and many valleys are turned into reservoirs 
lor the precious fluid. Large farms are being sur- 
veyed, divided and subdivided to meet the demands 
of the vast immigration that is pouring in by steamer 
and railroad, so the citizens in the interior cities and 
towns are striving, as they never did before, to get 
people of means and experience to buy up the rich 
lands surrounding these places and begin farming, 
dairying or stock raising. 

All these great changes and improvements portend 
a revival in every branch of industry everywhere. 
In San Francisco, where so much is to be accom- 
plished, it is presumed that there will be more men 
employed and more horses and wagons and carts used 
than was ever known before. Laborers and skilled 
workmen we can get, but horses will be difficult to 
find, for the constantly growing demand in the in- 
terior has been a big drain on the supply. There- 
fore, when contracts are let for grading and hauling 
away materials and bringing in the hundreds of thou- 
sands of tons of iron, stone, brick, cement, etc., and 
the millions of feet of lumber, there will be buyers 
sent to all parts of California, Oregon, Washington, 
Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah for horses for 
this work. To supply hay and grain for this un- 
precedented number of horses will be another diffi- 
cult problem to solve. So farmers and stock breeders 
have much to anticipate. And the man who has the 
means to buy some extra horses and mules will have 
no reason to regret it, for this "boom" will last nearly 
three years, and the demand for good ones will al- 
ways be greater everywhere than the supply. While 
San Francisco must, necessarily, be the principal 
market for horses, there will be buyers from the 
interior attending the horse sales to supply the half- 
million or more newcomers who will settle in Cali- 
fornia before 1915. 

The millions of dollars lying idle in our banks and 
safe deposit vaults will be drawn upon and put into 
circulation. Every manufacturer, merchant, property 
owner, farmer, mechanic, and laborer will feel the 
effects of this movement to make San Francisco the 
greatest city outside rf New York in America. It 
will be the well paid work of tens of thousands of 
energetic men in all walks in life who will strive 
unceasingly to place it among the greatest commer- 
cial cities of the world. Geographically, it has the 
advantage over all others facing the Pacific Ocean. 
It has the finest and safest harbor in the world; its 
e'imate is the most equable, while topographically it 
has advantages very few cities possess; and. as the 
the doorway of the Occident and the Orient it has 
no rival. Now that its citizens have awakened to its 
many possibilities and realize what they can accom- 
plish by concerted effort, it is for them to bury all 
past differences, silence the cry of hard times, and 
push on the great work which calls for the expendi- 
ture of almost ninety millions of dollars in three 
years. The citizens of San Francisco and the country 
at large have just cause for feeling jubilant and 
optimistic, for the golden opportunity which Dame 
Fortune has left at the threshold of this favored city 
by the sunset sea is ours if we only grasp it. 

o 

Charley Dean's string of horses is increasing at a 
remarkable rate of speed. Frank Perry, p., 1, 2:15, 
the kindergarten phenom, is at the farm, and is one 
of the recent noted purchases by Dean for the Cana- 
dian magnate, R. J. MacKenzie. He also bought one 
three-year-old, five two-year-olds, and a yearling. 
They consist of Burnewin, 1, a trotter, by Ess H. Kay, 
p., 2:00?4, dam by The Beau Ideal 2:15%; the follow- 
ing two-year-olds: Spriggan, by Baron McKinney, 3, 
2:10%, cut of Helen Simmons 2:11%; Zenatello, by 
Bellini 2:13%, out of Katherine Hamlin, dam of four, 
bv Mambrino King; Baroness Ceres, by Baron Re- 
view 2:2114, out of Aria Axtell 2:29%; Baroness 
Psyche, bv the same sire, and out of Durnella 2:18%, 
and Red Sheet, by Mainsheet 2:05, dam by Axworthy, 
3, 2:15%. The three-year-old is by Bellini 2:13%, 
and wasecmsigned to the sale as a pacer, but refused 
to hit a lick at that way of going. He took a notion 
to trot before the lead pony at the Old Glory and 
showed just $625 worth. His dam was the one-time 
$10,300 beauty, Miss Previous, which was sold at the 
time for that price as a yearling. 



SUNFLOWER 2:24, BY ELMO 2:27. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman: 

In ycur "Answer to Correspondents" of your issue 
of January 13th, attention was called to a mare called 
Sunflower by Elmo, dam Ella Kellogg by Chieftain. 
I remember Ella Kellogg well for I passed upon her 
for the late Calvin Kellogg when he purchased her 
from the late Frank Chapman, then a stable keeper ' 
in Sacramento, and later proprietor of the Norfolk 
stables CD Ellis street, San Francisco. I have driven 
her, and, in fact, I named her Ella Kellogg merely as 
a stable name, as she was then kept in my stable, 
409-411 Taylor street, "The Club Stable." I named 
her knowing that Mr. Kellogg's charming daughter's 
name was Ella, and both she and the mare were 
handsome blondes. Hence I called the mare Ella 
Kellogg. She was an elegant roadster, either single 
or double; if she were not, Mr. Kellogg would never 
have owned her, as he was an expert behind one, two, 
three, or four horses. He drove her about two years 
on the San Francisco driveways. One day while 
his man was leading her from Martin O'Dea's black- 
smith shop, she received an injury, and later, upon 
my advice, Mr. Kellogg bred her to Elmo and the 
mare Sunflower was the result. 

When Mr. Kellogg purchased the mare from Mr. 
Chapman the latter gave her breeding in the pres- 
ence of the late George Condon and myself as by 
Chieftain, dam by Rifleman, son of Imported Glencoe. 
I believe that was her true breeding. So if the above 
is of any value to the horse breeding public all well 
and good, but I hope my version of this breeding will 
not lead me into another controversy, or that some 
individuals will claim I am a "rambler," etc., as I 
would rather take a scent of Mag-po-tine than to 
have my Scotch-Irish blood disordered by fighting 
for my rights when I know I am in the right. When- 
ever such accusations are made I will not quit as 
long as money and power lasts. Another thing, I 
never allow myself to become over-sanguine about 
any one claim where there is a single doubt in my 
mind. 

The above breeding I have and always will believe 
to be Ella Kellogg's true breeding. Mr. Kellogg gave 
the same when he sold her to the late Henry W. 
Seale, and I worded the same to E. J. Travis and the 
late Monroe Salisbury, and later on, in conversing 
with the late W. S. Hobart over my choice of the 
daughters of Director as speed-producing mares, I at 
all times named this mare, Director's Flower, as she 
showed me the marks of a great speed-producing 
mare, for I believe she carried a double cross 
of the blood of Glencoe, one of my favorites of all 
the thoroughbred sires, for his blood blended so har- 
moniously with certain strains found coursing through 
the veins of many trotting horse families. Director's 
Flower never joined the late Hobart Farm harem and 
I believe every one interested knows why she didn't. 
Her opportunity to fulfill my predictions as a speed- 
producing mare, I am at a loss this moment to know. 
Sincerely yours, 

SAMUEL GAMBLE. 
o 

NOTES FROM MARYSVILLE. 

Attracted by the new track, which horsemen claim 
is the fastest on the Northern Circuit, more than 
twenty horses have been stabled at the Marysville 
grounds and the local stables bid fair to be the Mecca 
for much racing stock during the winter months. 
The track is in good condition and the horses are 
worked out daily. 

Among the horses of note stabled here for the 
winter are the two stallions of J. F. Elwell, Junior 
Dan Patch and Vareol. The former was sired by the 
famous Dan Patch and the latter by the well known 
Nutwood Wilkes. Junior Dan Patch brought In his 
owner $2,950 the past season, pacing second in the 
$5,000 purse at Portland. Vareol is kept more for 
breeding purposes. 

William Duncan, who earned an enviable reputation 
as a driver last season, has a string of horses in his 
care at the local track, among them being Mabel, 
owned by George Magruder, who won $1,950 in the 
past season. Her record is 2:15%. Aeroletta, a two- 
year-old, owned by William Harkey, of Gridley, has a 
record of 2:21, having won in the past season the 
Breeders' Futurity and Oregon Futurities. Sir John 
S., owned by Willard Vance, with a record of 2:04%, 
is stabled in Marysville. Other promising horses at 
the track are the four-year-old Marline, owned by 
Dr. Randolph, of Williams; George Woodard 2:07%, 
belonging to Dr. Merrill, of Colusa, and Diawood, the 
property of John Hanna, of Colusa. 

John Renatti has a string of promising colts in 
training at the Marysville track, the home of his 
horse, Monteo. 

Following is the schedule for the Grand Circuit 
adopted at the last meeting of the Board of Stewards 
in New York City: Grand Rapids, July 8-13; Kala- 
mazoo, July 15-20; Detroit, July 22-27; North Randall, 
July 29-Aug. 3; Buffalo, Aug. 5-10; Pittsburg, Aug. 12- 
17; Salem, N. H.. Aug. 19-24; Readville, Aug. 26-31; 
Hartford, Sept. 2-7; Syracuse, Sept. 9-14; Michigan, 
Sept. 16-21; Columbus, Sept. 23-Oct. 5; Lexington, 
Oct. 8-19. 



James E. Hague, the veteran turfman and driver 
of harness horses, known all over the United States, 
died at Los Angeles on Tuesday. Hague, who was 
61, formerly lived in Peoria, 111., and drove many 
horses to victory on the Eastern tracks. For several 
vears he had lived in retirement in Los Angelea. 



Saturday, January 20, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



The following entries in Occident Stake of 1914 
closed January 1, 1912: 

D. L. Bachant's Athleen, by Athasham-Corrine Neil- 

son. 

J. Li. Balkwill's Boulet, by Stamboulet-Estrella B. 

E. M. Barber's foal, by Prince Ansel-Everette. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's All McKinney, by Nearest M- 

Kinney-Mrs. Weller. 
Mrs. S. V. Barstow's Miss Hayes, by Bon McKinney- 

Maud J. C. 

H. A. Bassfords Helen J., by Palo Kins-Lulu B. 
Geo. T. Beckers' Zolite. by Zombro-Lady Secretary. 
Geo. T. Beckers' Zomie Beck, by Zombro-Cyrena. 

Geo. T. Becker's foal, by The Bondsman-Lady Van Zom. 
W. V. Bennett's foal, by Bon Voyage-Clara Collins. 

I. L. Borden's foal, by Barney Barnato-Hester McKinney. 
I. L. Borden's foal, by Barney Barnato - La Belle Alta- 

mont. 

Bowman & Maurer's Kinworthy, by Prince Axworthy- 
Malverna. 

Alex Brown's foal, by Prince Ansel-Nutflower. 
Alex Brown's foal, by Prince Ansel-Arista. 
Alex Brown's foal, by Nuristo-Anselois. 
Alex Brown's foal, by Nuristo-Zanita. 
E. O. Burge's Grace B-, by Stam B. -Princess Eulalie. 
Mrs. F. H. Burke's Yoncalla. by Bon Voyage-Birdie. 
J. J. Campbell's Bon Cress, by Bon Voyage-Kate 
Kopje. 

C. A. Canfield's foal, by Carlokin-Mamie Elizabeth. 

C. A. Canfield's foal, by Carlokin-Eilleen. 

C. A. Canfield's foal, by El Volante-Chloe. 

S Christenson's foal, by Bon Voyage-Perza. 

Wm. E. Detels' Bonnie Melba, by Bon Guy-MelbaT. 

Donnelly & Ivey's The Surgeon, by Lijero-Daisy W. 

R. L. Draper's Carlotta. by Carlokin-Lady Hackett. 

E. D. Dudley's foal, by Palite-Friskarina. 

E. D. Dudley's foal by Palite-Ima Jones. 

W. G. Durfee's Ethel D., by Carlokin-Roberta Madison. 
W. G. Durfee's John Warwick, by Carlokin-Alameda 
Maid. 

W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Ezelda. 

W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-My Irene S. 

W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Ophelia. 

W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Subio. 

W. G. Durfee's foal, by Directum Penn-Carolyn C. 

W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Anabella Loftus. 

F. E. Emlay's Beauty McKinney, by Washington Mc- 

Kinney-Bird W. 
L. C. Gates' Robert S., by Bon Voyage-Dew Drop. 
L. C. Gates' Guylokin, by Guy McKinney - Carlokin 

Queen. 

C. A. Harrison's Tosora, by The Patchen Boy-Niquee. 
Ted Hayes' Bon Heur. by Bon Voyage-Cecile M. 

Ted Hayes' Bertha E. Brown, by Carlokin-Belle Pointer 
Ted Hayes' foal, by Bon McKinney-Helen Keyes. 
Heilbron Bros.' Del Rio. by Lijero-Dot Knight. 
Heilbron Bros.' Rose R., by Lijero-Callie. 
Hemet Stock Farm's Lottie W., by Geo. W. McKinney- 
Hemet Light. 

Hemet Stock Farm's Geo. W. Carter, by Geo. W. McKin- 

ney-Louise Carter. 
Hemet Stock P'arm's Alice T., by Geo. W. McKinney- 

Mamie Redmond. 
Hemet Stock Farm's Mayberry, by Geo. W. McKinney- 

Muriel C. 

Hemet Stock Farm's Frank H., by Geo. W. McKinney- 
Lady Zonibro. 

Hemet Stock Farm's Senator Felton, by Geo. W. McKin- 
ney-Stambia. 

Hemet Stock Farm's Acacia, by Geo. W. MeKinney-Lou- 
ise R. 

Hemet Stock Farm's Geo. McKinney, by Geo. W. McKin- 

ney-Kinney Rosebud. 
Hemet Stock Farm's Nealton, by Worth While-Nealy W. 
Geo. L. Herndon's Caroline, by Lijero-Nightingale. 
H. S. Hogoboom's Honest Boy, by Palo King-lone. 
J. B. Iverson's Princess Alcon, by Alconda Jay-Salinas 

Princess. 

W. J. Irvine's Jno. F. Heenan, by Lijero-Ever Green. 

M. C. Keefer's Prince Vosta, by Prince Ansel-Advosta. 

M. C. Keefer's Dulzura. by Adansel-Laura Smith. 

M. C. Keefer's foal, by Zombro Colt-The Trueheart. 

A. S. Kellogg's foal, by Black Hall-Lilleth. 

A. S. Kellogg's foal, by Black Hall-Diabless. 

A. S. Kellogg's foal, by Athasham-Myrtle. 

Ernest Kemp's Bertha Kemp, by Athasham-Babe Kemp 

D. Lynn's foal, by G. Albert Mac-Belle Lvnn. 
J. W. Marshall's foal, by Bon Voyage-Madeline. 

F. H. Metz's Bon Fire, by Bon Voyage-Queen Abdallah. 
W. T. McBride's Laverta, by Alconda Jay-La Moscovota 
Capt. C. P. McCann's Lady Alation, by Alation-Miss 
Lady Patchen. 

D. D. McDonald's Don Zombro M., by Don Reginaldo- 

Francis Zombro. 
W. B. McGowan's Healani, by Zolock-Queen Derby. 

E. McLees' Orange Bell, by Bon Voyage-Zomitella. 
Dana Perkins' foal, by Stam B.-Zaya. 

Henry Peters' Sweet Verne, by Jules Verne-Bradtmore. 
A. L. Scott's Bonnie Rose, by Le Voyage-Rosie Wood- 
burn. 

Chas. F. Silva's foal, by Lijero-Cammellia. 

Cas. F. Silva's foal, by Teddy Bear-Swift Bird. 

Thos. Smith's foal, by General J. B. Frisbee- 

P. H. Smith's Zomarine S., by Zombro-Katherine 
P. H. Smith's El Volante S., by El Volante-Sevilles. 
P. If. Smith's foal, by El Volante-Rosemarv. 
John Suglian's Just Right, by Tom Smith-Hazel Mac. 
Valencia Stock Farm's foal, by Zombro Heir-La Belle H. 
Valencia Stock Farm's foal, by Zombro Heir-lsabelle. 
Vendome Stock Farm's Iran Alto Second, by Iran Alto- 
Eva. 

Geo. L. Warlow's Edith Hall, by Black Hall-Soisette 
Geo. L Warlow's Alice Hall, by Black Hall-Strathalie. 
Geo. L. Warlow's Walton Hall, by Black Hall-Narcola. 
Geo. L Warlow's Moto, by Nogi-Donnagene. 
Geo. L Warlow's Wick Hal], by Black Hall-Cora Wick- 
ersham. 

Jay Wheeler's Garrel, by Gerald G.-Leona Wilkes. 

F. E. Wright's Dr. John, by Palite-Toots W. 

J. W. Zibbell's foal, by Tom Smith-Kate Lumry. 
E. S. Knowlton's Symbernal. by Symboleor- Fancy P. 
Mabel Llpson's foal, by Best Policy-Alta Altamont. 
Homer Rutherford's Bonnie Porter-by Hon McKlnney- 
Golden Bliss. 

o 

Percy F. Clemons, of St. George, Ontario, was the 
owner of Mary Best, 4, 2: 12 14 for the past three 
years, but was compelled to put her to death Decem- 
ber 7. She was so worn out that she was unable to 
eat, and a well planted bullet was an act of mercy. 
Her foal of 1907, by Directum Spier, 4, 2:1114, which 
came dead, was her last. She could not have bred 
on, but she produced The Quaker 2:18% and W. M. 
Corbitt, who is in the sires' list. She was a chestnut 
mare, bred at the San Mateo Stock Farm, foaled 1890, 
by Guy Wilkes 2:15»4, dam Montrose (dam of three), 
by Sultan 2:24, and took her record in a winning 
race at Cleveland, O., in 1894. 



Occident Stake of 1912. 

Following is a list of payments made January 1, 
1912: 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's Belle Amnion, by Nearest McKin- 
ney-Aunt Joe. 

W. G. Durfee's Consuelo B.. by Del Coronado-Beatrico. 

Alex Brown's foal, by Prince Anscl-Serpolo. 

Alex Brown's foal, by Prince Ansel-Bonnie Derby. 

Alex Brown's foal, by Nushagak-Nosegay. 

Estate of Frank H. Burke's Mabel Claire, by Con- 
ductor-Lady Belle Isle. 

A. G. Dahl's Zomjud, by Zombro- Judith. 

E. D. Dudley's Enchalada, by Palite-I'aprika. 
W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Lady H. 

Robert Garside's Chanate, by Alconda Jay-Dora Mc- 
Kinney. 

J. Arthur Hardy's Miss Helen, by Greco B. -Fannie G. 
D. W. Wallis's Sissy, by Greco B. -Josephine. 
Hemet Stock Farm's Wilbur Lou, by Kinney Lou- 
Louise Carter. 

H. S. Hogoboom's His Highness, by Palo King-Queen 

Alto. 

S. H. Hoy's Busy Body, by Iran Alto-Diawalda. 

Jos. D. Cornell's Queen Ansel, by Prince Ansel-Nuvola. 

A. L. Scott's Nutwood Lou, by Nutwood Wilkes-Cora. 

F. E. Ward's El Bell Maden, by Almaden-The Silver 

Bell. 

I. L. Borden's Albaloma. by Almadcn-Loma B. 

J. H. Torrey's Joe Todd, by Baronteer Todd-Bessie T. 
D. L. Bachant's Soison, by Athasham-Soisette. 
J. W. Zibbell's foal, by Tom Smith-Kate Lumry. 

Occident Stake of 1913. 

Following is a list of payments made January 1, 
1912: 

D. L. Bachant's Fresno Maid, by Athasham-Corinnc 
Neilson. 

L. E. Barber's Burke, by Lord Isle-Madge. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's Mc McMinney, by Nearest Me- 

Kinney-Aunt Joe. 
Mrs. S. V. Barstow's Lady Alto, by Alto Express-Mrs. 

Weller 

Geo. T. Becker's Zomie's Secretary, by Zombro-Lady 
Secretary. 

Geo. T. Becker's Zomie Gray, by Zombro-Trott Mc- 
Grath. 

L. G. Bonfilio's foal, by Del Coronado-Atherine. 
I. L Borden's foal, by Barney Barnato-Hester McKin- 
ney. 

I. L. Borden's foal, by Barney Barnato-La Belle Alta- 
mont. 

Bowman & Maurer's Peter Huck, by Blue Peter-Mal- 
verna. 

Brolliar & Garver's Direct Policy, by Best Policy- 
Brownie Direct. 

E. M. Barber's Arista Ansel, by Prince Ansel-Arista. 
Alex Brown's foal, by Prince Ansel-Lottie. 

Alex Brown's foal, by Prince Ansel -Lauress. 
L. B. Daniels' The Voyager, by On Voyage-Nocha. 
Dr. M. C. Delano's Elco, by Lijero-Iran Bell. 
J. F. Heenan's Doratine, by De Oro-Lady Valentine. 
E. D. Dudley's Truthkin, by Carlokin-Truth. 
E. D. Dudley's Hazel Bee, by Palite-Bee Stirling, 
E. D. Dudley's John Rice, by Palite- Paprika. 
W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Mv Irene S. 
W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Lady H. 
W. G. Durfee's foal, by Carlokin-Beatrice Zombro 
W. G. Durfee's foal by Del Coronado - Roberta Madi- 
son. 

W. G. Durfee's foal by Del Coronado-I ran Belle. 
E. E. Sherwood's Tirenzi by Carlokin-Mowitza. 
L. W. Folsom's Zee Todd, by Baronteer Todd-Grace T. 
Hemet Stock Farm's foal, by Geo. W. McKinney-Mamie 
Redmond. 

Hemet Stock Farm's foal, by Geo. W. McKinney - Lady 
Zombro. 

Hemet Stock Farm's foal, by Geo. W. McKinney - Lou- 
ise R. 

W. J. Irvine's California Mc, by McKena-Ever Green. 
E. P. Iverson's Ellen Lou. by Kinney Lou-Queen Karen. 

E. H. Nason's Fowler, by Silente-June. 

J. P. Nichols' Dexter Lou, by Kinney Lou-Alma Dexter. 

A. L. Scott's Bon Prix, by Bon Voyage-Cora. 

C. A. Spencer's Star Ansel, by Prince Ansel-Noraine. 

John Suglian's Hazel Smith, by Tom Smith-Hazel Mac. 

.las. Thompson's foal, by Nobage-Zombell. 

Ted Hayes' Zombowage, by Nobage-Zombowette. 

Vendome Farm's B. Rea, by Nearest McKinney-Eva B. 

F. W. Wadham's Johano, by Carlokin-Johanah Treat. 
Geo. L. Warlow's foal, by Athadon-Cora Wickersham. 
Geo. L. Warlow's foal, by Stamboulet-Soisette. 

F. E. Wright's La Ampola, by Prince Ansel-Idora. 
J. W. Zibbell's foal, by Tom Smith -Kate Lumry. 



WHAT TO DO WITH A STALLION. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Parties who own stallions, and contemplate giving 
them proper opportunities — by this we mean, secur- 
ing for them a liberal patronage of well-bred mares, 
and at the same time deriving satisfactory monetary 
returns — should commence not later than the latter 
part of this month, to judiciously advertise them. 

Gentlemen with business acumen have fully learned 
the salutary lesson, that, it does not answer the pur- 
pose to keep their property practically hid. 

Experience has thoroughly demonstrated the fact, 
that no matter how well bred a stallion is, or how 
promising his get are showing, it is absolutely neces- 
sary to let the pilbllc know something about him and 
his location as well, and furthermore, that Of tw > 
horses of about equal qualities, the one advertised 
judiciously and the other not, the former will, in a 
surprisingly short time, eclipse his competitor and 
demand a larger fee as well as secure an increased 
patronage. 

Never fear that, your horse will be too well 
known. That is a state of affairs as yet unheard of. 
If your property is practically worthless, it is true 
that the least said relative to him is really the bet- 
ter but again, if he has quality and is not adver- 
tised, nine people out of ten will naturally conclude 
that he is worthless and the owner tacitly makes an 
admission of the fact by not advertising him. 

George Wilkes 2:22, founder of a great tribe, was 
not extensively advertised until he was about seven- 
teen years of age, and it can be truthfully said, that 
his career as a stallion dated from that time. The 
merits of Electioneer were unrecognized until he 
had attained almost the same age. Either of these 
two wonderfully successful sires could have, in all 
piobability, made his owner a snug sum long before 
that time. 

The same holds good with many other horses, 



which, if properly advertised and thereby furnished 
the opportunities early in life, would have excep- 
tionally bright chances of becoming popular with the 
breeding public; otherwise, if their good qualities 
are not made known, they remain in obscurity. 

Our most successful stallion owners contend, that 
if a ljorse is worth keeping entire, ne is worth the 
very best opportunities that may possibly be pro- 
vided him and if the owner does not intend to do 
t.iis, the animal should be castrated. 

Occasionally an advertisement does not appear to 
pay, but in such isolated cases the owner is invaria- 
bly to blame, for the simple reason that he overlooks 
chances to be of assistance to the publication carry- 
ing his business by not following up promptly, the in- 
quiries made relative to his property. 

Again, your stallion may be a trifle slow in getting 
expected results, but if properly advertised, the time 
comes when his reputation receives general acknowl- 
edgement, and the public will come your way in num- 
bers. 

If you have confidence in him. you will, by adver- 
tising him, give others confidence as well. The aver- 
age individual is naturally of the opinion that an 
owner has but little respect for his property, if he 
lacks advertising proclivities and we must admit 
that we are of the same class. 

If a horse is really good, a liberal supply of type 
matter will advance him in the estimation of the 
public quicker than any other known way. While 
some of our readers may think these statements 
rather far fetched and written solely to advance our 
own affairs, we but ask them to study the situation 
and see how many stallions ever became famous 
without being advertised. While there may be one 
or two cases, they acquired success when practically 
too old to be of much service. 

This is not what the 1912 individuals desire. They 
want their property to secure reputations while in 
the full bloom of youth, and prove remunerative in- 
vestments. 

No one desires a horse, endowed with the true 
elements of greatness, to pass the period of his 
youth and vigor in obscurity, and then — figuratively 
speaking— flame up like a dying candle, at the very 
end of his career. It is no satisfaction whatever to 
an owner, to hear remarked, "That he had unques- 
tionably a great sire, if afforded proper opportunities 
during the useful years of his life," yet it has un- 
doubtedly been the sad fate of many a truly great 
horse, through the fact that, unfortunately, he was 
the property of an unenterprising owner. — American 
Sportsman. 
, o 

FANELLA 2:13 A WONDERFUL MARE. 



Referring to Fanella 2:13, the celebrated daughter 
of Arion 2:07% and Directress 2:19, by Director 
2:17; second dam Aloha (dam of King Buzz 2:23%, 
etc.) by A. W. Richmond 1687, that has made such a 
marked impression upon the records, an exchange 
pays her the following deserved tribute: 

"Fanella had already done much to place her name 
high on the roll of honor by producing such horses 
as Sadie Mac 2:06%, a winner of the Kentucky Fu- 
turity and an unbeaten stake winner as an aged 
mare until she fell dead in a race, and the wonderful 
sire, Todd 2:14%, that in a few years has done 
enough to keep his memory green for many years 
to come, despite the fact of his untimely death, just 
when he seemed to be entering on the threshold of 
one of the most successful stud careers that a stal- 
lion ever enjoyed. 

"But in 1911 she increased her standard list to 
five, by the addition of the young stallion, Todding- 
ton, that took a record of 2:20, and the yearling colt, 
John E. Madden, that dropped into the list with a 
record of 2:27%. But it does not stop here, for 
Toddington also obtained a high place as a sire by 
his first crop of yearlings. But one of them was 
trained for a record, but that one was Frank Perry 

(1) 2:15, the world's champion yearling, and the first 
yearling to reach the 2:15 mark. Another yearling, 
a trotter, stepped a quarter in 33 seconds, and she 
most certainly had the capacity to trot a mile in 
standard time and possibly considerably better than 
that. Still another yearling was one of the most 
sensational in Kentucky early in the season, but was 
not worked later in the year. Todd added farther 
laurels still to his already full crown, for he was 
represented by four trotters that took records within 
the 2:10 list, his standard list increased by several 
new names. Three of the quartette of new 2:10 trot- 
ters secured their records in races, Al Stanley 2:08*4, 
Gordon Todd 2:09%, Electric Tcdd 2:09'/i, and the 
fourth, Sue D., time record 2:08y 2 , obtained a race 
record of 2:11%. And that he is destined to breed 
on was proven by his granddaughter, Princess Todd 

(2) 2:12%, the best two-year-old of the season by 
far." 

The Rural Spirit of recent date, in leaded lines and 
surrounded by a conspicuous border, publishes a 
communication which reads as follows: "I am vey 
much pleased to hear that you are going to leave the 
race-horse business out of your paper. That Is 
something the farmer does not want." Poor, mis 
guided scribbler! He is just one of his class, and 
probably the sole surviving member. As to the 
farmer not caring for harness racing, that is all 
bosh. Racing in the west is practically supported by 
the farming community. — Horse Review. 

Bon Volonte 2:19% won a matinee race last Sat- 
urday in Los Angeles in 2:20 and 2:20. 



G 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 



I NOTES AND NEWS 1 



Chas. Durfee will train his horses at San Jose this 
year. 

Have you been to Studebaker's to see those Too- 
iney earts and Frazier sulkies? 



Chas. de Ryder made a flying trip to Portland, 
Oregon, on Tuesday. He will return in a few days. 



Daughters of Diablo 2:09% produced two new 2:10 
performers in 1911— Little Lucille (3) 2:09 and Gin- 
ger 2:10. 



R. J. Mackenzie and wife visited Pleasanton last 
Saturday and were well pleased with the way their 
horses looked. 



Some years ago there was an auction sale of 
horses from the Boord ranch, Orland, Cal. Can any 
cf our readers loan us a copy of the catalogue issued 

for it? 



.1. B. Iverson's mare, Mamie Riley 2:16, dropped a 
fine, lusty little filly by Clear Voyage (son of Bon 
Voyage 2:08), last Saturday at Salinas. It ought to 
be a good one. 



Elmo Montgomery and Frank Childs are busily 
engaged driving their strings of trotters and pacers 
on the Sacramento track. This course has been in 
perfect order all winter for exercising horses. 

William L. Snow has driven seven pacers to re- 
cords below 2:05. Darkey Hal 2:02%, Fanny Dil- 
lard 2:03%, Hal Raven 2:03%, Zombrewer 2:04%, 
Hal B 2:04y 2 , Star Hal 2:04%, Star Patchen 2:04%. 



Thomas W. Murphy put six trotters in the 2:10 
list during the season of 1911 — Charley Mitchell 
2:04%, Belvasia 2:06%, B. T. C. 2:06%, Cascade 
2:08%, Vanitv Oro 2:09%, and Eva Tanguay 2:09%. 



Alcantara, by George Wilkes, is the sire of six 
pacers in the 2:10 list and the sire of 14 dams of 
2:10 pacers. Gambetta Wilkes has 16 pacers in the 
2:16 list and is the sire of six dams of 2:10 pacers. 



McKinney 2:11%, is now the great grand-sire of 
a 2:10 performer, Palo King, by the dead Zombro 
2:11, sired Little Lucile (3) p. 2:09, a good little 
winner of the past season. 



Noretta by Norris (dam of Lady Maude C. 2.00 %, 
and Hedgewood Boy 2:01), has a weanling colt by 
General Watts (3) 2:06%, and will be returned to 
him. J. C. Henry, of Taylorville, 111., owns the mare 
and colt. 



Absolute dispersal of the entire breeding interests 
of the I'hlien Farm will take place at the Wiscon- 
sin State Fair grounds, Milwaukee, Wis., March 20, 
at public auction. This includes ten Harvester year- 
lings. 



Fred H. Chase & Co., the well-known auctioneers, 
will hold their annual Spring Combination Sale on 
March 18th. The market is good and owners sl.ould 
avail themselves of this opportunity to consign them 
to this sale. 



Wm. J. Wilson, the manager of the Tip Top Ranch 
stallions at Pleasanton, writes that The Bondsman 
served his first mare last Friday. Her name is 
Midget by Carmichael's Prince out of Dewdrop by 
Norfolk, and belongs to L. C. Gates, of Modesto, Cal. 



Wm. J. Kenney has a number of sulkies and road 
and jogging carts for sale at remarkably low prices. 
Seekers after these will have rare opportunities to 
make selections from his stock at 531 Valencia 
near Sixteenth street. 



Mr. A. V. Mendenhall has sent us one of the shoes 
worn by Prince Alert 1:59% when he was driven by 
the late Jack Curry at the Empire City track, New 
York, in 1904. It will be placed beside another 
curio in this office, i.e., one of the shoes worn by 
Lady Moscow, the famous old trotter, in 1850. 



Ted Hayes is handling an eight-months'-old filly 
called Bertha E. Brown. She is by Carlokin 2:07%, 
out of Belle Pointer (dam of Boton de Oro 2:11%) by 
Sky Pointer. This filly is a very pretty gaited trot- 
ter, worked a quarter in 55 seconds and loves to 
stick to that way of going. 



Bon Voyage's best race last year was not his win- 
ning race at Woodland, but at Marysville, the fol- 
lowing week against Kingbrook; he trotted the first 
heat in 2:07%, second in 2:08% and the third in 
2:09, coming the last quarter faster than any other 
in the three heats. 

The greatest curse our pure bred live stock breed- 
ers has to to contend with is the commission men, 
who do business under their hats and make It a 
point to pick up ring-tails and rough necks and 
dump them into the Hawaiian Islands. San Fran- 
cisco is now, and has been for some time, overrun 
with these unscrupulous gentry. — Butchers' and 
Stockgrowers' Journal. 



Zomboyage, by Nobage, out of Zomboyetta, was 
worked by his owner, Ted Hayes, over the Los An- 
geles track last Monday a mile in 2:33%, and a half 
in 1:13. He can beat 2:30 any time and will not 
be a two-year-old for some months. 



There seems to be a scarcity of high-class trotting 
horses for the Midwinter sale in New York next 
month. Owners realize that, as a money-making 
proposition, there will be plenty of opportunities this 
year for their trotters and pacers to engage in. 



After C. McCarthy inspected Tom Smith 2:13%, 
at San Jose, he declared he was one of the finest 
made McKinneys he had seen and immediately de- 
cided to breed his handsome mare Schoolgirl, by 
Prodigal 2:16, to him this season. 



Our "Breeders' Number" to be issued March 2d 
will contain many articles of interest, and for owners 
of stallions that are to stand for the season of 1912, 
it will be the best medium they can have to let 
owners of mares know the merits of their horses. 



Charles Durfee recently bought a half interest in 
two Sidney Dillon mares from George Stickles, of 
Angels Camp; one is out of a mare by Silver Bow 
2:16, and the other is Ascania, full sister to Custer 

2:05%. 

Maurico, the wonderful three-year-old at Los An- 
geles, is claimed by competent judges to be the fast- 
est horse of his age in California. He will be pre- 
pared by W. G. Durfee for the Eastern stakes. Last 
summer he trotted eighths in fifteen seconds, and he 
was only two years old then. 



How highly Kentucky Todd (3) 2:08%, the noted 
young stallion owned by Miss K. L. Wilks, of Gait, 
Ont, is thought of, is shown by the fact that three 
of the best-bred and producing matrons of Patchen 
Wilkes Farm are booked to this son of Todd. 



A number of cases of glanders have recently been 
discovered in Tulare county by State veterinary of- 
ficials, and the animals killed. Dr. George Gordon, 
livestock inspector of Kings county, also discovered 
several cases of glanders and farcy in his county 
during December. 

Henry Helman, who has charge of the Salinas race- 
track, has made many improvements there. With his 
well known reputation for keeping everything neat 
about his horses, he has thoroughly cleansed the 
stalls; and the "boys" eating house is as clean as 
any dining room can be. 

Fred Ward has a colt at Los Angeles called Eagle 
M., by Escobado, out of a mare by Direcho; second 
dam by James Madison 2:17%, that worked a quar- 
ter in 37 seconds last Monday. He is not two years 
old, and is a very promising trotter. His dam hav- 
ing died when he was a foal; he was raised on Eagle 
brand milk, hence his name. 



The Pacific Horse and Sportsman's Review a pub- 
lication which succeeded the Horse Department of 
the Rural Spirit, published in Portland, Oregon, 
made its initial bow last week. It is a neatly printed, 
well edited journal and will doubtless fill a long felt 
want in horse circles in the northwest. John McClin- 
tock is the editor. 



From the present outlook the 2:05 pace should be 
a hummer next year. Such pacers as Don Pronto 
2:05%, Teddy Bear 2:05, Adam G. 2:05%, Sir John 
S. 2:04y 2 , Jim Logan 2:05%, Blanche 2:06%, Dr. 
B. P. 2:06%, Hal McKinney 2:06%, Gracie Pointer 
2:06%, Aerolite 2:07%, Inferlotta 2:04%, and Francis 
J. 2:08, would surely make some horse race. 



Last Saturday, Mr. J. B. Iverson, well known trot- 
ting horse enthusiast of Salinas, had the misfortune 
to lose a fine foal by The Bondsman from his prize- 
winning mare Ivoneer, the dam of the stake winner 
North Star 2:11%. Mr. Iverson philosophically writes: 
"These things occur in the breeding business, so we 
will have to bear the loss gracefully." 

Congressman James B. Cox, of Dayton, O., and 
tepresenting the Third District, was the chief speaker 
at the annual meeting of the Springfield Matinee 
Club and early in his remarks stated that he had 
always been a great admirer of King Solomon be- 
cause the record showed that he owned something 
like 40,000 horses while he had only about 800 wives. 



It is with regret trotting horse enthusiasts on this 
Coast will read of Frank Wright's retirement from 
the ranks of breeders. In this issue he offers all the 
well bred horses he owns, including that grand stal- 
lion Lijero 2:15%, several broodmares, and some 
promising "prcspects." Whoever buys Lijero will 
have a horse that will pay for himself the first 
season, for he is just the type of a stallion to breed to. 



Formal acceptance of the invitation to become a 
member of the Grand Circuit, the changing of the 
$21,000 Kentucky Futurity to a two in three instead 
of three in five heat event; creating a four-year-old 
division for the futurity to be worth $5000 and a 
gold cup, were the features of the session of the 
stockholders of the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers' Association at Lexington last Tuesday. Presi- 
dent Ed Tipton and other prominent harness turf- 
men were present and the session lasted throughout 
the afternoon. The directors will change the class 
of the Transylvania stake at the April meeting. 



It is time that the horsemen of the valley were 
considering the proposition of a horse show. If it 
is intended to hold one it is high time that a start 
was made in the matter. In recent years the com- 
mittee in charge has always been hampered by 
starting too late. The matter can easily be decided 
by calling the principal horse owners together for a 
discussion. — Livermore Herald. 



Grand Circuit harness racing will undergo im- 
portant changes next summer as the result of action 
taken at the annual meeting of stewards last week. 
In the allotment of dates New York City and Pitts- 
burg are admitted to the circuit, Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, is invited to join, Columbus is reinstated, while 
Indianapolis is withdrawn and is out for the com- 
ing year at least. 

There is a well-founded report from Lexington that 
a syndicate of Minnesota horsemen and breeders re- 
cently offered W. E. D. Stokes, owner of Peter the 
Great 2:07%, the sum of $100,000 for the noted sire, 
and the report further states that "the offer was 
promptly declined." With the above also comes the 
report that a group of wealthy horsemen have made 
an offer for the entire farm and the stock thereon. 



Haggie Brown, the grandam of The Patchen Bov 
(3) 2:10% wae by a non-standard stallion called Ash- 
land Clay, a sen of Curtis' Clay. Ashland Clay sired 
Geo gie M. 2:15% and Little Frank 2:19%, and the 
dams of Den S. 2:04%, Martha Marshall 2:06>/ 4 , Gor- 
don Prince Jr. 2:07% and many others. This makes 
Patchen Boy's pedigree much stronger than it ap- 
pears in the advertisement. 



T. J. Crowley, one of the directors of the P. C. T. 
H. B. Association, was a visitor at the new Los An- 
geles race track last week, and reports it to be one 
of the best he has ever seen. Nearly 300 horses are 
in training there and box stalls are at a premium. 
The greatest enthusiasm prevails among the mem- 
bers of the Los Angeles Driving Club and some 
remarkably good reinsmen, as well as fast horses, 
are being developed there. 



W. T. McBride, proprietor of the Rose Hotel, Pleas- 
anton, is also the owner of that great broodmare 
La Moscovita, dam of Bon Guy 2:11%, Yolanda 
2:14%, Tina 2:20%, and the dam of Bon McKinney 
2:28 and Frank W. 2:07%. He bred her to The 
Bondsman last spring and is waiting anxiously for 
the appearance of the foal. It will be worth a lot of 
money, for there will be few better bred ones in 
California. 

Jake Brolliar. the well-known horseman of Visalia, 
is handling one of the fastest trotters he ever broke 
in fact, it is one of the best ever seen in Tulare 
county. It is a yearling colt called Direct Policy, by 
Best Policy, and unless something happens to him 
he will be a hard one to beat as a two and three- 
year-old. Mr. Brolliar only owns a half interest in 
him. Mr. J. A. Garner, of Ducor, owns the mare and 
sold a half interest in the colt to this enthusiastic 
trainer. 



From the fact that at the recent Kentucky sale 
of thoroughbreds nearly 200 head, most of which were 
among the best-bred animals in the country, only 
sold for an average of $111, it would not appear that 
breeders take much stock in the widely published 
scare that without the aid of thoroughbed blood we 
shall soon be without suitable material for the cav- 
alry service, or that the blcod of the running horse 
is absolutely necessary for the production of any type 
of horse whether for business or p'.easure. 



Edmond Blanc, one of the foremost breeders and 
turfmen of France, has purchased the American sire 
Hermis from Henry M. Ziegler. The terms of the 
sale have not been made public, but the son of Her- 
mance and Katy-of-the-West was purchased to suc- 
ceed Flying Fox at the head of the big French 
stud, and it is known that a large sum was paid, 
probably nearly as much as the $197,000 which M. 
Blanc gave for Flying Fox. We had always regarded 
Hermis as a gold brick, as indeed he was in his 
racing, but he may be all right as a breeder. 



Mrs. F. H. Burke's handsome bay mare Tina 2:20% 
(sister to Yolanda 2:14%), by McKinney 2:11%, 
while being dr'ven on one of the principal streets 
of San Jose last Saturday, was almost run into by a 
little girl who was cutting "figure 8's" on a bicycle. 
So close did this rider come to the mare that the 
latter was pulled back on her haunches. The fol- 
lowing morning her caretaker, Patsy Davey, was 
shocked to see she had slipped a fine filly whose sire 
was Tom Smith 2:13%. The police should put a stop 
to children on the highways imitating circus perform- 
ers who do hair-raising stunts on bicycles. 

At the annual meeting Monday evening of the Riv- 
erside Driving Club directors were elected to serve 
the organization for the present year. The reports 
indicate that the club is in a healthy condition finan- 
cially, with a number of improved facilities for good, 
clean sport in this city. A meeting of the newly 
chosen directors will be held on the call of Presi- 
dent Hammond when the officers for the year will 
then be named. The directors selected at the meet- 
ing were the following: H. A. Hammond, J. F. Back- 
strand, H. P. Zimmerman, Henry Engenbrod, H. G. 
Stanley, G. H. Judd, Dr. J. W. Arnold, O. E. Holland, 
W. L. Scott, M. J. Wheeler and Axel Nelson.— River- 
side Enterprise. 



Saturday, January 20, 1912.] THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



PACIFIC COAST CIRCUIT ARRANGED. 



Pursuant to the call issued by Mr. Shirley Christy, 
secretary of the Territorial Fair Association, Phoenix. 
Arizona, a large number of prominent horse owners, 
breeders and members of the various agricultural fail- 
associations assembled in Parlor "A" of the Palace 
Hotel, on Thursday afternoon, with a view of forming 
a Pacific Coast Fair and Racing Association. 

The meeting was called to order and Senator Ben 
F. Rush was elected temporary chairman, Shirley 
Christy secretary. Remarks were then made upon the 
object of and necessity for calling this meeting and 
forming a Pacific Coast association. W. A. Clark, Jr., 
set forth his views in an able manner; H. S. Ensign, 
of Salt Lake, Charles Durfce, Frank E. Alley, of Rose- 
burg, Oregon, Prof. E. P. Heald, T. J. Crowley, A. L. 
Scott. George L. Warlow, S. Christenson. H. S. Rolston, 
of Vancouver, I. L. Borden and others followed. A 
committee was appointed consisting of the following 
to draft resolutions to be presented at the evening 
session: W. A. Clark. Jr., F. E. Alley, I. L Borden, 
H. S. Ensign, M. C. Keefer and S. Christy. W. A. 
Clark, Jr., was appointed chairman. 

At S o'clock the list of those present was much 
larger than in the afternoon, and the enthusiasm 
displayed showed what a deep interest this meeting 
had for everyone. 

The reading of the following report was the first 
order of business and every resolution thereon was 
unanimously adopted. The question of final selection 
of dates, however, was settled after the formation of 
the association. 

Whereas. This committee has met in executive ses- 
sion and considered briefly the best means of effecting 
an association or incorporation for the purposes and 
objects outlined in the motion authorizing the appoint- 
ment of such committee; and 

Whereas. This committee believes it is for the best 
interests of the harness-horse owners and lovers, as 
well as for the best interests of the various fair and 
racing associations, that a united effort be made to 
organize and perpetuate a Pacific Coast Fair and 
Racing Association; 

Therefore, we, your committee, do hereby recom- 
mend that an association be formed, to be known as 
the Pacific Coast Fair and Racing Association; 

We further recommend that such association have 
for its object and aim the arrangement of one prin- 
cipal or "grand" circuit of fairs and race meetings, 
together with as many smaller or secondary circuits 
as may be found advisable, to the end that better 
fields of horses may be provided at the various meet- 
ings, and that the owners of racing stables and the 
many breeders who exhibit livestock may be able to 
race and exhibit their stock with as little expense as 
possible ; 

We further recommend that a committee of three 
be appointed by the temporary chairman and author- 
ized to prepare suitable rules and by-laws for the 
regulation of such association and its members, which 
committee shall report at such time as may be desig- 
nated by the chairman; 

We further recommend that, until such time as the 
association shall adopt its by-laws, any fair or racing 
association may become a member by making appli- 
cation for racing dates upon the circuit to be arranged 
for the season of 1912 and agreeing to abide by the 
decision of this association with respect to such dates; 

We further recommend that an organization be ef- 
fected at this time by the election of the following 
officers, to-wit: a president, vice-president, secretary, 
treasurer, and seven directors, constituting a govern- 
ing board of eleven members, who shall hold office 
until the next regular election to be provided for by 
the by-laws; 

We further recommend that a committee of three 
be appointed for the purpose of conferring with the 
horse owners and trainers present and making sug- 
gestions to the president of the association concerning 
the proposed classes for the various races to be given 
upon the circuit; and concerning such other matters 
as may be of interest to the horse owners and trainers; 

We further recommend that a committee of three 
be appointed and authorized to meet with the North 
Pacific Fair Association at their next regular meeting 
for the purpose of securing the endorsement and co- 
operation of the North Pacific Fair Association, and 
that such committee be furnished with a list of the 
various fair and racing associations and horse owners 
who have agreed to affiliate with and support this 
association. 

W. A. CLARK, JR., Chairman. 

The following officers were elected: 

[. L. Borden, of San Francisco, was chosen president 
of the association, and Shirley Christy, of Phoenix, 
Arizona, the man who is responsible for the move- 
merit which resulted in the formation of the associa- 
tion, was made secretary. Frank J. Alley, of Rose- 
burg, Oregon, was named vice-president, and F. J. 
Crowley, of this city, was elected treasurer. The 
board of directors follows: James A. McKcrron. San 
Francisco; W. F. Whittier, Hemet Stock Farm; H. S. 
Rolston, Vancouver; W. A. Clark, Jr., Los Angeles; J. 
H. Booth, Roseburg, Oregon; S. Christenson, San 
Francisco, and G. A. Westgate, of Salem, Oregon. 

The discussions on all points vital to the interests 
of the trotting horse industry on this Coast was spir- 
ited, and the task of arranging dates for the fairs and 
race meetings of 1912 was a most difficult one. Presi- 
dent Scott, of the California State Fair, and George L. 
Warlow, vice-president, spoke in behalf of that great 
institution and pointed out the value of holding fairs 
at certain places in conjunction with the State Fair, 
and, in order to give the people of the North an op- 
portunity to bring their horses and livestock to Cali- 
fornia, the dates of the State Fair were set back. 
This opened the way for action. Prank E. Alley most 
eloquently championed the cause of the great North- 
west and was followed by H. S. Rolston, who repre- 
sented Vancouver, B. C. The latter spoke of the dates 
claimed In the Canadian Circuit and how anxious many 
who participated in the races in the following places 
were to come to California, and this is the schedule 
of dates claimed for their meetings: Calvary, July 
1st; Winnipeg, July 16th; Brandon, July 22<1; Rcgina, 
July 29th; Edmonton, August 5th. He said that Van- 
couver being the starting place on the circuit, whence 
the horsemen could proceed through Washington. Ore- 
gon, California and Arizona, it claimed the date 
August 12th to 19th; after much discussion the fol- 
lowing dates were also claimed. C. L Allen, making a 
strong plea for San Jose, while I. L. Borden, In reply 
to an insinuating remark made, championed the cause 
of the P. C. T. H. B. Association, stating In a few words 
how much this sterling organization for over twenty- 
two years has upheld the trotting horse Industry of 
this Coast; had been. In fact, its backbone. 

The place where the meeting of the Breeders will 
be held had not been decided upon, but It was stated 
that it would undoubtedly take place either in Santa 
Rosa, Stockton or Chlco. The Salt Lake City and 
Fresno dates are the same, the horsemen being given 
their choice of these cities. 



Following is the schedule of dates now claimed: 

Vancouver, II. AiikuiI 13th to August Midi. 
Seattle, Wash., AukiinI Ifttll to August 25th. 
Portland, Oregon, Intrant -(ith t» September 2d. 
Salem, Oregon, September -<I to September Mb. 
San .lose, September !>ili to September 14th. 
Sacramento, September 14tb to September 21at. 
Breeders' Association of California (place not fixed), 
September a.'fii to September 80th. 

Fresno, September 80tb to October 8th. 

suit Lake t'lt>. September :tniii in October 8th. 

Hnnfprd, October 7th to October 14th. 

I -os Ingeles, October I4tb to October aixt. 

San Diego, October 21st in October listh. 

Pbocnlx, Arizona, November 4th to November L2th. 

Besides the Canadian Circuit, it was pointed out in 
the meeting that horsemen can send their horses to 
the circuit of the Pacific Northwest Fair Association, 
which includes North Yakima. Spokane, Centralla, 
Walla Walla; Lewiston. Idaho, and Boise, Idaho, and 
to the Willamette Valley Circuit in Oregon. 

A fourth secondary circuit which includes a chain 
of towns in Northern California and Southern Oregon, 
including Marysville, Chico. Roseburg, Oregon, and 
others, also is under the control of the association 
just formed, the following dates being allotted: 

Marysville, July 17th to 20th. 
Chlco, July 24th tu 27th. 

Roseburg, Oregon, July 30th to August 3d. 

S. S. Bailey, of Pleasanton, made a stirring address 
upon the necessity of appointing a competent pre- 
siding judge for the circuit and also a first-class 
starter. He spoke from a long experience, and stronglv 
advocated the appointment of a committee to inter- 
view the railroad officials regarding rates of trans- 
portation for men and horses on this circuit. 

There were some remarks concerning the absence 
of delegates from many cities in California where 
race meetings have been held in the past, but, it was 
explained that as they had made no efforts to be there, 
it was apparent that they did not care to come in 
under this schedule of fairs. 

A committee composed of A. V. Mendenhall, W. G. 
Layng and D. L. Hackett. all of this city, was named 
to draft a constitution and by-laws, and Secretary 
Christy was instructed to confer with all of the fair 
associations in the towns of the Grand and California 
circuits, regarding their sanction of the association. 
Also a committee of three, consisting of F. E. Alley, 
H. S. Rolston and Shirley Christy, was appointed to 
confer with the North Pacific Fair Association in 
arranging the matter of dates to conform to those of 
the Grand Circuit. 

After some discussion regarding the giving of big 
purses and thoroughly advertising this circuit, it was 
also resolved that the closing of entries in all early 
closing events be not more than ten nor less than 
eight weeks prior to each meeting. The matter of 
classification and having uniform conditions govern- 
ing the same was left to the secretaries of the various 
associations comprising this organization. 

Some one facetiously remarked that an organization 
had been formed and a treasurer elected, but there 
was nothing for that official to do, as he had no 
money to carry on the work. President I. L. Borden 
at once started a fund by giving $100; W. A. Clark. Jr.. 
the Los Angeles representative, followed with $500; 
S. S. Bailev, $50: Mrs. F. H. Burke. $25; Senator Ben 
F. Rush, $20; Keefer & Spencer, of Woodland, $20; 
then a number present subscribed other sums, none 
less than $5, and the meeting adjourned after tender- 
ing thanks to Senator Ben F. Rush, Shirley Christy. 
W. A. Clark, Jr.. and others who worked so hard for 
the success of the organization. 

Following is a list of those present: Senator Ben 
F. Rush, Suisun; W. A. Clark. Jr.. Los Angeles: Shirley 
Christy. Phoenix. Arizona; Frank E. Alley and J. H. 
Booth, Roseburg. Oregon: H. S. Rolston. Vancouver, 
B. C; E. J. Ensign, Salt Lake City; C. Allison Telfer. 
F. E. Wright. F. Ruhstaller. J. Silva. C. Silva and Ben 
Walker. Sacramento; Mrs. F. H. Burke, Roy Mead, C. 
A. Durfee, C. L. Allen and J. Twohig, San Jose; George 
Warlow. Dickenson; Mrs. Leoto Zapp, Fresno; 
Robert S. Brown, Petaluma; J. H. Burns. Santa Rosa; 
Lon Daniels. Chico; W. Duncan. Marysville; R. O. New- 
man. S. Gallup and T. Dobrensky. Newman; James W. 
Marshall. Dixon; Elmo Montgomery, Davis; M. C. 
Keefer and C. Spencer. Woodland; A. V. Mendenhall. 
Oakland: S. S. Bailey. Dick Wilson, W. J. Wilson. W. 
.1. McBride and Fred Ohadbourne, pleasanton; Ted 
Haves, Los Angeles; T. L Borden. A. L. Scott, J. A. 
McKerron, Prof. E. P. Heald. T. J. Crowley. F. W. 
Kellev. S. Christenson. W. G. Liyng, D. E Hoffman, 
w. Kramer, l>. L Hackett, rra B. Dalziel, William J. 
"enney, W. Higginbot torn. A. Schwartz. T. F. Bannan. 
F Lauterwasser and D. West. San Francisco. 

The books are open with Secretary Shirley Christy 
for further enrollments. 

• -: . — o ■ 

Fred H. Chase & Co. will hold one of the best sales 
rf trotting stock ever seen in California at the 
PaviMon, 478 Valencia street, on Monday evening, 
February 12th. It will consist of all the trotting 
stock belonging to George E. Stickle of Lockeford, 
headed by an untried four-year-old stallion by Bon 
Voyage 2:08, out of the dam of Helen Stiles 2:08%. 
There are some of the grandest broodmares in the 
country in this consignment, and as this is a complete 
r'ispersal sale, every one wiil be sold without reserve. 

Mc T <inney 2:11*4 should be credited with another 
2:30 performer, his daughter Fuschia Mack, out of 
a mare by Gossiper, second dam by Echo, obtaining 
a record of 2:27% trotting in a race at Roseburg, 
Oregon, July 4th. She belongs to the Brnaday Stock 
Farm. 



J. Twohig has made arrangements to stand tint 
grandly bred Hon Voyage stallion, Hon McKinney 
(3) 2:24%, three-year-old trial in 2:15, half in 1:05, 
at the San Jose race track this season. He should 
get his book filled in a little while. 



Cclonel Luke Emerson, of Bowling Green, Pike 
County, Mo., has at that place the largest breeding 
establishment for jacks, jennets and mules in the 
world. He has invested $300,000 in the business and 
has ten barns that will accomodate 1500 head. 



Logan Pointer, by Star Pointer 1:59%. out of 
Effie Logan, will make 'he season of 1912 at Davis. 
Logan Pointer is a half-brother to Jim Logan 2:05% 
and Sir Albert S. 2:03%, and is a splendid individual. 
Carey Montgomery will have him in charge. 



HORSES INCREASE IN VALUE. 

E. Stewart, head of the E. Stewart Automobile 
Company of this city, distributers of the S. G. V. and 
Crawford cars, in a recent discussion regarding the 
"passing" of the horse, went into a lengthy review, 
in which he showed that the liberal introduction of 
the motor car is not responsible lor the higher price 
for horseflesh because of the falling off in breeding. 
Stewart said in part : 

"The horse has been to the American continent 
what the camel has been to the African desert. 
Without him, the United States would be 50 per cent 
less developed. He has carried the weary wanderers 
over the desert in search of gold, has helped to make 
homes out of the vast era of desert unturned soil, 
has carried the American soldier to victorious battle, 
has held the world's record for time and speed, and 
has saved many a life by virtue of his almost human 
intelligence, yet I venture to say that he is abused 
and overworked by 50 per cent of his masters. 

"In the early days the ox team was the favorite, 
when the horse was more or less untamed. To-day 
America boasts of $3,000,000,000 value of these faith- 
ful beasts, costing perhaps $600,000,000 to feed an- 
nually. 

"Where the great percentage of horses are raised, 
throughout the East and Middle West, the farmer 
usually raises enough for his own use and may have 
a few each year to sell to buyers from the large 
cities. These are mostly of the draft horse style. 
A large percentage of the light wagon and livery 
horses are raised on the mountain ranges running 
from Wyoming to the Pacific Slope. The Eastern- 
raised horses have made a steady increase in value 
during the last fifty years, owing to the wonderful 
development of the country and the great demand 
in the recent foreign wars. The demand for the 
light Western horses was created mainly through the 
development of the Pacific Coast and the demand for 
government horses. The government to-day is con- 
templating raising its own horses owing to the scarc- 
ity of the right kind. 

"The prices have risen during the past eight years 
from $5 to $10 per head to $60 to $100 per head, the 
supply being diminished through the taking up of 
the government lands and the supplanting of sheep 
and cattle. Had it not been for the advent of steam 
and gasoline engines, there wculd have been a hoise 
famine, since the country has developed faster than 
the animal has grown. But to-day the horse is at the 
height of his career; another decade may seo his 
general usefulness greatly diminished. And we wel- 
come it. First, because we love the horse and dislike- 
to see him abused; second, the advent of electric and 
gasoline power will supplant his usefulness to a great 
extent; third, we need his fcod to assist in feeding 
the human race. 

"However, contrary to the popular notion, the 
spread of the automobile through the country has not 
diminished either the number or the value of horses 
here. Figures on both these points have come out in 
bulletins which have just been issued by the census 
bureau at Washington. The advent of the power car 
has been coincident with the present decade. Al- 
though some of these vehicles were made as early as 
1898, the year of the Spanish war, the industry was 
not important enough in 1900 to get separate mention 
in the census returns that year. The government 
figures show that the total number of automobiles 
built in the United States in 1904 was 22,830, which 
has increased to 127.289 in 1909. These are the years 
covered in the government inquiry so far as the in- 
formation has been given out. The figures for 1910 
and 1911, though not here furnished, would undoubt- 
edly show a gain over those of 1909. 

"Yet in these years the auto's old time forerunner 
was making large gains. The 21.625,800 horses, 
mules, asses and burros which were in the United 
States in 1900 had increased to 24,016,024, or a gain 
of 115 per cent. This was far from being as large 
as the increase of population in the decade, which 
was 21 per cent, but the fact that there was any gain 
at all will surprise many people. The value of these 
animals increased in a far greater rati,), however, 
jumping from $1,099,000,000 in 1900 to $2,613,000,000 
in 1910, an expansion of 137.7 per cent. Part of this 
gain in value, of course, is due to the increase which 
has taken place in prices of nearly every product 
during the decade. The average value per head of 
horse's in 1900 was $53.03 and $112.53 in 1910, an 
increase of 112.2 per cent. Nor, so far as detailed 
statements have been received, have horses and 
mules decreased in numbers in the last three or four 
years, the period of greatest expansion for the auto- 
mobile." 

The Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Associa- 
tion, through the action of its stockholders at the 
annual session, accepted a membership in the Grand 
Circuit, and the next trotting horse race meeting, 
which will be from October 8th to 19th, will mark 
the close of the 1912 season on the "big ring." It 
vag also slated to change the Kentucky Futurity so 
that it will have three instead of two divisions for 
trotting, and so that three-year-olds will race under 
the two-in-three instead of the three-in-five plan. The 
condition cf the Kentucky Futurity of the future will 
ore vide $5000 for two-year-old trotters, $14,000 for 
three-year-olds, $2000 for three-year-old pacers, and 
$5000 and a gold cup for four-year-old trotters, mak- 
ing a total money offer of $26,000. 



Second payments en seventy-nine co'ts and fillies 
wore made in the Arizona Futurity purse for foals of 
1911. The list will appear in our next issue. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeVVITT. 



THE INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION. 

The circular given below issued by Secretary 
Elmer E. Shaner will meet with the approval of every 
traps hooter. The bane of the sport has been the 
•promoter" — whether a single individual or the gun 
club running a shcot. 

The Interstate Association proposes to eradicate 
some of the nondesirable features in the way of ad- 
vertising and other things that are of no really prac- 
tical benefit to anyone but the grabber. 

Under the registered tournament system club 
shoots are placed on an even business basis that 
will no dcubt be appreciated not only by the shoot- 
ers themselves but some merchants who have been 
held up in the past. 

At the Interstate Association's annual meeting 
some weeks since, it was unanimously decided that 
as the registered tournament plan of 1911 was so 
successful and satisfactory, this course would be 
continued during the year 1912. In a circular issued 
by the Interstate Association, which is being mailed 
to all the more prominent gun clubs cf the country, 
the association says: 

"The Interstate Association's primary object in the 
encouragement of trap shooting is to encourage 
state associations, leagues of gun clubs and special 
organizations; therefore, it is the association's pres- 
ent intention to do all in its power to urge and foster 
the formation of State associations and leagues of 
gun clubs in those States where none now exist. 
The Association anticipates that in 1913 cr 1914 it 
shall probably be in a position to contribute more 
generously to State and similar organizations. 

"A broad experience has demonstrated that the 
registration of tournaments confers many important 
advantages to trap shooting activities, but that, if 
not safeguarded and controlled by proper restric- 
tions, it is subject to many abuses, petty and serious. 
The promoter, actuated by purely business reasons, 
is the chief offender. For the sport or its advance- 
ment he cares nothing; for the profits, he hungers 
greatly. Under the old conditions, each succeeding 
year the mushroom club and the hungry promoter 
were becoming more numerous, and, accordingly, 
the Interstate Association was expending money for 
which no return was given in the way of promoting 
legitimate trap shooting. Yet many legitimate at- 
tempts at holding tournaments resulted in failure, 
because the sum total of so much gun club effort 
exceeded the demand for competition. The majority 
of shooters have limitations to their purses besides 
having a limit to their craving for competition. There 
is such a thing as too much shooting with its harm- 
ful reactions. 

"Again, under the old conditions, a strong club 
holding a successful tournament often made exces- 
sive profits, which were out of all proportion as com- 
pared to the effort and expense of holding the tour- 
ment. Of course, the excessive profits came out of 
the shooters' pockets. 

"The new conditions eliminate the undesirable fea- 
tures while developing the sport on lines that are 
broad, wholesome and permanent. The matter of 
good sportsmanship is given full consideration. 

"Referring more in detail to the changes made at 
the annual meeting in 1910, the Interstate Asociation 
decided that gun club program advertising by its 
members shall cease from January 1, 1911. 

"In place of program advertising, the Interstate 
Association has substituted a yearly contribution of 
$20,000. 

"In the apportionment of the $20,000 contributed 
by the Interstate Association, the States are divided 
into three classes — A, B and C. Class A includes 
States with a population of 3,000,000 or over. To 
each State Association Tournament of this class 
the Interstate Association will contribute $300, to be 
applied to the Squier money-back system. Class B 
includes States with a population of under 3,000,000 
to over 1,000,000. To each State Association Tourna- 
ment of this class the Interstate Association will 
contribute $200, to be applied to the Squier money- 
back systems. Class C includes States with a pop- 
ulation of under 1,000,000. To each State Associa- 
tion Tournament of this class the Interstate Asso- 
ciation will contribute $100, to be applied to the 
Squier money-back system. The matter of popula- 
tion will be determined by the census of 1910. 

"A State Association in a Class A or Class B State 
must have a membership of ten or more bona fide 
gun clubs located in ten or more different cities or 
towns. A State Association in a Class C State must 
have a membership of five or more bona fide gun 
clubs located in five or more different cities or towns. 

"The Interstate Association, at its discretion, may 
exact proof of the proper organization of any State 
Association which applies for a Registered Tourna- 
ment. The foregoing applies to State Associations; 
or to a league of gun clubs in a State which has no 
State Association. 

"The following applies to individual gun clubs: 

"Any gun club, a member in good standing of a 
State Association or of a league cf gun clubs, may 
apply for registration. Applications from gun clubs 
not members of a State Association or of a league 
of gun clubs will not be considered. 

"To each two days approved tournament, the In- 
terstate Association will contribute $100, to be ap- 



plied to the Squier money-back system. To each 
one day approved tournament, the Interstate Asso- 
ciation will contribute $">0, to be applied to the Squier 
money-back system. 

"When a gun club applies for a two days tourna- 
ment, the granting of such application shall depend 
on the attendance at, and success of, previous regis- 
tered tournaments of said club, if any were held. 
The determination of whether it shall be a one day 
or two days tournament is at the discretion of the 
Interstate Association. 

"The records of the Interstate Association show 
that the most successful tournaments held during 
the past few years were those of one day duration, 
and that many two days tournaments which had a 
good attendanc the first day were failures in point 
of attendance the second day. Therefore, applica- 
tions for one day registered tournaments will be 
given the preference in 1912. 

"Any applicaticn for a registered tournament must 
be made not less than ninety (90) days in advance of 
the tournament opening date. 

"The Interstate Association suggests that when 
the percentage system, class shooting, is used, two 
moneys be made for ten entries and under, and that 
when the high gun system is used, three high guns 
win the money for ten entries and under. 

"Gun clubs located in sections where freight rates 
are excessively high, thus making targets cost con- 
siderable more than they do in the East, may charge 
2% cents or 3 cents per target, if it is customary to 
make such charge at tournaments. The Interstate 
Association suggests, however, that, when more than 
2 cents per target is charged, the entrance in the 
regular program events be increased to $1.50 per 
event. 

"The Interstate Association's contribution will not 
be paid to any club until such time as such club, 
holding a registered tournament, and have sent in 
the requisite report of the tournament to the Inter- 
tate Association." 

All communications or applications for registered 
tournaments should be made to Elmer E. Shaner, 
secretary-manager of the Association, 219 Coltart 
avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 



STRIPED BASS CLUB PRIZE WINNERS. 



The San Francisco Striped Bass Club trophy win- 
ners for the past season announced by Chairman 
James Lynch at the club's annual banquet Saturday 
evening were: J. C. Wallace, first prize, club gold 
high hook medal for landing the largest striped bass, 
a 32 pound fish; Chris Johnson, second prize, for 
a 17 pounder; W. D. Smith and "Doc" Wilson, third 
and fourth prizes, for 16 pound fish; fifth prize, 
Charles E. Urfer, 12*4 pound bass; se^etith and 
eighth prizes, Fred Franzen Emil Accret. respective- 
ly, 10 pound fish; ninth prize, H. Von Dohlen, 9 pound 
fish; tenth and eleventh awards, A. W. Thornton, 7 
pound fish, and James S. Turner, 4 pound fish. 

The prizes were rods, reels and other fishing tackle 
favored by the festive clam tossers. The mysterious 
prize donated by Charles H. Kewell was drawn by 
lot, Charles P. Landresse was the winner, with tag 
No. 13. 

Many speeches were made by different anglers 
present. The evening was enlivened with song and 
story by Bob Clark, Spec Smith, H. Healey, E. 
Accret, Jim Turner, C. P. Landresse and others. 

Among those present were: President Joe Gabar- 
ino, James Sinclair Turner, Fred Franzen. Dr. F. in. 
Madden, Charles P. Landresse, J. X. De Witt, frank 
O'Donnell A. W. Thornton, Chris Johnson, H. F. 
Davis, J. C. Wallace, Doc Wilson, Hugh Draper, Tim 
Lynch, Will Lynch, Joe C. Meyer, Terry Evans, 
Thomas Goldsmith, Jack Duckell, Emil Accret, C. G. 
Geilfuss, G. H. Sangstack, Bob Clark, F. Messner, 
Spec Smith, H. Healey, Ed Conlin, L. P. Meaney, H. 
Von Dohlen, James Lynch, Chas. H. Kewell and 
others. 

RECORD PISTOL SCORES. 



James E. Gorman of this city beat the 100 shot re- 
cord by 13 points in Golden Gate Rifle and Pistol 
Club shoot at Shell mound Sunday, January 14. Gor- 
man made 956, while the former record was 943. 

Pistol scores. 50 yards, standard American tar- 
get— Dr. R. A. Summers, 89, 87, 89, 90; C. W. Seely, 
84, 82, 86, 87, 86, 89. 89; W. G. Williamson 89; C. W. 
Randall, 92; C. W. Linder, 90, 86, 91; J. E. Gorman, 
98, 92, 94, 95, 95, 96, 98, 96, 98, 96, 97, 95; J. Apl 
pleyard 82, 72, 90, 86, 80, 77, 76, 81. 85, 79, 81; R. 
Mills, 89, 88, 94, 90, 88, 97, 96; W. C. Pritchard, 89, 
98, 88, 90, 93, 91. 



An immense horned owl was a victim of a coyote 
trap recently. The trap had been set by Sam Little- 
field, of Pleasant Valley, Wash. ,and when he discov- 
ered the intruder he was astonished at its size. 
The bird measured nearly six feet from tip to tip. 
Littlefield has decided to send the bird to the Lincoln 
Park zoo in Chicago. 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 
INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION AVERAGES FOR 1911. 

Secretary Elmer E. Shaner announces as the offi- 
cial Interstate Association list of amateur averages 
tor 1911, with names of contestants, total number of 
targets shot at in Registered Tournaments, total num- 
ber of targets scored and percentages. 

The averages for single targets are based on a 
minimum of 2,000 targets, as per the Interstate As- 
sociation ruling to that effect. The records of the 
tournaments held at Detroit, Mich., April 26-28, Cal- 
gary, Alberta, Canada, July 4-5, and Portland, Maine, 
August 15-16, were not received, and, of course, are 
not included in the list. 

The averages for double targets are computed 
on the Interstate Association Tournaments only, and 
they are based on taking part in two tournaments 
as a minimum, as per the Interstate Association rul- 
ing to that effect. 

Averages for Single Targets — Amateurs. 

Per- 

Shot Per 

Name and Address. a t. Broke cent 

Spencer, W. .S., St. Louis, Mo 2100 2022 ' 96'>8 

Graham J It. Ingleside. Ills 4050 3677 '.9573 

\\ lute. J P W atertown. S. Dak 3190 3037 .9520 

kahler, H. W., Philadelphia. Pa 4050 3846 .9496 

Lewis, Bart, Auburn, Ills 5040 4764 .9452 

Dixon, T.. Orongo, Mo 5950 5603 .9416 

\oung, J. 8., Chicago, Ills 3450 3246 .9408 

.sch loiter, H J Allentown. Pa 4450 4182 .9397 

Hell. Allen, Allentown, Pa 3800 3570 9394 

Ridley. Wm., What Cheer, Iowa 3850 3615 .9389 

Painter, Geo. E., Pittsburg. Pa 2800 26''9 9389 

Pottinger, H. P.., Charleston, Mo 4350 4079 9377 

Killer. T. H.. Slater. Mo 3200 2992 .9350 

Huntley, S. A., Sioux City. Iowa 4740 4430 9346 

Calhoun, J. P., McKeesport, Pa 2050 1914 9336 

Edwards. Dr. F. H., Columbus, Ohio. 3100 2893 .9332 

Clay, W. H.. St. Ixmis, Mo 5850 5458 .9329 

kuutzky. .Jos., Ft. Dodge. Iowa 2200 2050 9318 

Baton, C. P., Fayette, Mo 2950 2737 .9278 

Gates, Li. A.. Columbus, Nebr 2400 2226 9'»75 

Livingston. J. K., Sprtngville. Ala. . . 2000 1854 .'9270 

Westcott. C. G., Leesburg, Fla 2050 1897 .9253 

Veach. Wm., Falls City. Nebr 3950 3649 .9238 

Barto, J. P., Chicago. Ills 2350 2165 .9212 

McNeir, F W.. Houston, Texas 2850 2623 .9203 

Fisher, Lon, Columbus, Ohio 4960 4561 9195 

Campbell, Frank. Waukee, Iowa 2950 270s .9179 

Blunt. .1. A., Greensboro. Ala 2000 1833 9165 

Collins, C. C, Aldine, Ind 2300 2105 9152 

Thompson, Riley, Cainesvllle, Mo... 3300 3019 .9148 

Nuti, (). H., Beaver, Ohio 2100 1921 9147 

Slocum, Fred P., Watertown, S. Dak. 2940 2689 9146 

Shoop, Marion. Novinger, Mo 2950 2697 .9143 

Smith, H. E.. Columbus, Ohio 3040 2774 9125 

Hickey, D. E., Millvale. Pa 2000 1838 9190 

Newcomb, Chas. 1 1., Philadelphia, Pa. 2000 1838 .9190 

Weh.'-tcr, Will., Columbus, Ohio.. .. 3100 2821 9100 

Colli. Id. W. ]•;.. ftica. N. Y 2340 2129 .9098 

Frantz. C. L., Seneca Falls, N. Y.... 2280 2071 .9083 

Warren, Thos. A., Hot Springs, Ark. 2500 2270 .9080 

Noel, J. H.. Nashville, Tenn 3115 2828 9073 

llenline, C. D.. Bradford, Pa 2190 1984 9058 

Connor A. C, Springtield. Ills 3000 2708 .9026 

Moore, C. F.. Brownsville, Pa 2050 1849 .9019 

Huston. Fiemont, Perry. Okla 2800 2522 .9007 

Griffith, W. H.. Murf reesboro. Tenn. 2050 1840 .8975 

Martin. John, Brooklyn, N. Y 2000 1793 8965 

Campbell, W. It., Tulsa, Okla 3350 3002 .9861 

Coleman, Fred, Higins, Pa 2650 2374 .8958 

Coburn, C. D., Mechanicsburg. Ohio. 2500 2238 .8952 

Edwards, D. A., Union City, Tenn... 2700 241o .8944 

Davidson. I. C. Springfield, Ills 4200 3754 .8938 

Muncy. N.. Iowa City, Iowa 2900 2580 .8896 

Townsend. Wm. !>., Omaha, Nebr... 2450 2175 .8869 

Cain, J. E., Dayton, Ohio 3000 2660 .8866 

Hoon, W. S.. Jewell, Iowa 6300 5576 .8850 

Maland. John. Jewell, Iowa 2600 2296 .8830 

Shoop, H. B., Harrisburg, Pa 2050 1807 .8814 

Nlcolal, Geo., Kansas City, Mo 2100 1848 .8800 

Knglert, John L. Catasauqua. Pa.. 3200 2812 .8787 

Brown. W. A.. Sioux City. Iowa 3000 2634 .8780 

Ditto, C. H., Keithsburg. Ills 2450 2146 .8759 

Schroeder. G. A., Columbus, Nebr... 2900 2540 .8758 

Bray. D. D„ Columbus, Nebr 2550 2233 .8756 

Penn. John A., Dayton, Ohio 2620 2285 .8721 

Howlett, J. A.. Charleston. Mo 3000 2612 .8706 

Beard. Geo. A., Evansville, Ind 2450 2131 .8698 

Gellatly, C. G.. Sutton. Nebr 2450 2130 .8693 

Mackie, Geo. K.. Scamnion, Kansas. 4350 3755 .8632 

Donnelly, B. S., Chicago, Ills 2705 2330 .8613 

Osborne, P. E., W. Somerville, Mass. 3200 2724 .8513 

Gribble, .1. W., Brownsville. Pa 2100 1784 .8495 

Loring. Ray B., Marseilles. Ills 2350 1979 .8421 

Den. J. C, North Platte. Nebr 2150 1796 .8353 

Blanks, H. S., Vicksburg. Miss 2000 1664 .8320 

Fuchs. F. P., Evansville, Ind 2050 1675 .8170 

Dey. J. C. S.. Syracuse, N. Y 2355 1919 .8148 

Martin. John G.. Harrisburg, Pa.... 2800 2236 .7985 

Farnum, c. C. Wellavllle, N. Y 2540 2026 .7976 

Willoughby, F. W., Jefferson, Iowa. 2550 2033 .7972 
Morrison. J. I., Brownsville, Pa 2950 2323 .7874 

Averages for Double Targets — Amateurs. 

Shot Per 

Name and Address., at. Broke, cent. 

Heil. Allen, Allentown, Pa 200 174 .8700 

Graham. J. R.. Ingleside 450 369 .8200 

Gates, L. A., Columbus. Nebr 150 123 .8200 

Buckwalter, H. E., Royersford. Pa.. 200 163 .8100 

Kahler. H. W., Philadelphia, Pa 300 242 .8066 

Young. J. S.. Chicago, Ills 450 362 .8044 

Connor. A. C. Springfield, Ills 350 280 .8000 

Graham, T. E.. Ingleside. Ills 150 116 .7733 

Veach, Wm., Falls City, Nebr 150 113 .7533 

Clay, W. II., St. Louis, Mo 250 188 .7520 

Noel. J. H.. Nashville. Neb 350 263 .7485 

Griffith , W. H.. Murfreesboro. Tenn. 300 214 .7466 

Barto. J. B., Chicago, Ills 300 222 .7400 

Huntley, S. A., Sioux City, Iowa 200 147 .7350 

Baton, C. B. Fayette. Mo 150 110 .7333 

Dixon, H., Oronogo. Mo ojO 256 .7314 

McNeir, F. W.. Houston. Texas 300 219 .7300 

Thompson, Riley, Calnsville. Mo 250 1S1 .7340 

Chingren. E. J., Spokane, Wash. .. 150 108 .7200 

Blanks. H. B.. Vicksburg. Miss. .. 200 143 .7150 

Spotts, R. L, New York City, N. Y. 200 136 .6800 

Dodds. S. L, Hickman, Ky 200 128 .6400 

Osborne, P. E., W. Somerville. Mass. 200 119 .5950 

Edwards, D. A., Union City. Tenn.. 200 110 .5500 

Jacobsen, H. P., San Francisco, Cal. 150 78 .5200 

Bounties were paid on 1597 coyotes, 14 Lynxes, 116 
wildcats and one cougar to hunters in the Yakima 
valley during 1911, according to the report of boun- 
ties by the county auditor. 



Saturday, January 20, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



S 



PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIALS. 

Judge C. N. Post, president of the Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club, Tuesday announced the entries for 
the derby and the all-age stake of the club's field 
trials to be held on the Tevis ranch, near Bakers- 
field. The trials are to begin January 22d and con- 
tinue four days. Entries for the champion and mem- 
bers' stakes will close the night before the events. 

Interest in the field trials has been increasing each 
year, and there are now many owners of fine hunt- 
ing dogs who look forward to the annual event with 
great interest. Judge Post was the founder of the 
organization, and has always been very prominent 
in its activities. 

Judges for the coming trials have been named as 
follows: Henry L. Betten of Pomona, T. J. A. 
Tiedemann of San Francisco and William Dormer of 
Oakland. 

The entries for the derby and the all-age stake are: 
Derby. 

Buddie, setter dog; owner, F. C. Berry. 
Kildonan, setter dog; owner, F. J. Ruhstaller. 
Babe, setter bitch; owner, George B. M. Gray. 
Judge Post, setter dog; owner, Carroll Cook. 
Diamond King, setter dog; owner, C. D. Lutz. 
Bobs, setter dcg; owner, J. W. McKenzie. 
Jeff, setter dog; owner, J. H. Schumacher. 
Joconde, setter bitch; owner, C. N. Post. 
Lena B., setter bitch; owner, S. Christ enson. 
Shasta Frank, setter dog; owner, J. E. Terry. 
Agua Caliente, setter dog; owner, W. B. Coutts. 
Bohemian Prince, setter dog; owner, E. C. Ford. 
Melrose Danstone, setter dog; owner, J. W. Con- 
sidine. 

Doctor Duel, pointer dog; owner, J. W. Flynn. 
Brown Betty, pointer bitch; owner, J. W. Flynn. 
Three, painter bitch; owner, Stockdale Kennels. 
Stix Jr., pointer dog; owner, Gordon Tevis. 
Hardtack, pointer dog; owner Lansing Tevis. 
All-Age. 

Light, setter dcg; owner, F. J. Ruhstaller. 
St. Lamberts Doris, red Irish setter; George B. M. 
Gray. 

Merry Buck, setter dog; owner, William Dormer. 

Rex of Salem, setter dog; owner, •. 

Melrose Mac, setter dog; owner, J. W. Considine. 
Melrose Bill, setter dog; owner, J. W. Considine. 
Benvenuto, setter dog; owner, T. J. A. Tiedemann. 
Kent's Hal, pointer dog; owner, T. C. Dodge. 
Lad of Kent Jr., pointer dog; owner, Lansing 
Tevis. 

Chula, pointer bitch; owner, Lloyd Tevis. 
Alfond's Blue Ribbon, pointer bitch; owner, Gor- 
don Tevis. 

Shasta Queen, setter bitch; owner, J. E. Terry. 
Old Forrester, setter dog; owner, Joseph Chanslor. 

Ten cups have been secured by the cup committee. 
These trophies will be awarded to the three placed 
dogs in the derby, all-age and members' stake and 
to the winer of the champion stake. 



A nine months' Momoney-Becky Sharp puppy, 
which S. Christenson recently received from Louis 
McGrew, secretary of the All-American Field Trial 
Club, died of distemper along with two other setter 
puppies at W. B. Coutt's training quarters near Ba- 
kersfield two weeks ago. 



A pocket edition de luxe of setterdom is the 2f>- 
pound seter bitch by Count Whitestone-Peach Blos- 
som, owned by S. Christenson. 

- o 

NATIONAL DOG BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION. 

The members of the National Dog Breeders' Asso- 
ciation, in a meeting held this week, elected the 
following officers to serve for the ensuing year: J. 
Hervey Jones, president; William Blackwell, first 
vice-president; Phil M. Wand, second vice-president; 
W. V. N. Bay, secretary; George W. Ellery, treas- 
urer; J. Leo Parks, registrar. 

The Nationals — or "insurgents," as they have 
been dubbed — propose to conduct a big circuit of 
bench shows on the Coast and in the Middle West 
during the coming bench show season. 

o 

SAN FRANCISCO SHOW. 

Officers of the San Francisco Kennel Club have 
announced that the fourteenth annual bench show 
of the club will be held in Dreamland Rink cn 
February 29th to March 2d inclusive. Premium listr, 
will be mailed to the dog fanciers within the next 
few days. The judges have not been chosen, but 
probably will be named at the next meeting of the 
club. 

The show will be held under the rules of the Na- 
tional Dog Breeders' Asociation. 

The shipping of carp from eastern Washington lake 
points to the Eastern markets promises to become 
a good sized commercial adventure as well as a boon 
to fishermen and hunters during the next few years. 
It is estimated that 50 carloads are available in Col- 
ville lake near Sprague. Secretary Al Weiseman of 
the Spokane Fish Protective Association, who has 
been working hard to rid the nearby lakes of the 
carp, which is driving game fish from the waters and 
causing a duck famine by eating the fowl food, 
states that estimates place the carp in Moses lake 
ait 100 carloads, with others comparatively large. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BRITISH POINTER. 



As a matter of fact we are generally constrained 
to think there is only one pointer in the world, since 
the British pointer is in such great use the world 
over. But if we look over the sporting or gun dogs 
of Europe we will find there are many other kinds 
of pointers; and that they have excellent noses, are 
very staunch, and altogether useful dogs in their 
way, writes F. Freeman Lloyd in Recreation. The 
present day pointer-the one shot over everywhere 
in America — is purely a creature of circumstances; 
and he has been evolved to keep up to or alongside 
of the various changes of sport and the improve- 
ments in firearms and ammunition. 

For the purposes of this sketch I will simply use 
the term "pointer," and it must be regarded as ap- 
plying to the British pointer only, excepting where 
some other of the heavy, houndy-headed and gen- 
erally slow pointers of the continent of Europe are 
brought under notice. The root from which the 
pointer was obtained is the Spanish pointer. From 
that sunny country we have obtained many of the 
best dogs, or at least the stock that has been ex- 
ploited by generations of sportsmen and dog-lovers, 
and brought to its present day state of "fancy" per- 
fection. The Spanish pointer was and generally is 
a heavy, loose-made dog, standing about 22 inches 
at the shoulder. His head is large and his lips big 
and pendulous. In these characteristics we recog- 
nize his great scenting powers. The coat is short, 
and the colors may be liver color, liver and white, 
red and white, black, black and white, sometimes 
tanned about the face and eyes, often speckled with 
small spots on a white ground, the tail thin and 
smooth; frequently dewclaws on the hind legs; the 
feet sometimes turning a little outwards. This was 
the dog that was crossed with the English foxhound, 
the southern hound and harrier, and even the grey 
hound. The pointer of today is a dog made up of 
all these crosses, all introduced to give the desired 
result — an unerring nose,, staunchness on scenting, 
and, of course, plenty of speed. 

Setters are older than pointers so far as regards 
the tastes of the English speaking peoples. A 
known Spanish pointer to arrive in England was a 
dog the property of a Portuguese wine merchant. He 
was a nobleman — a Baron Bichell, and had con- 
siderable sporting opportunities in the county of 
Norfalk, a part of the country always noted for its 
partridges and other game, including hares. Baron 
Bichell could kill a bird on the wing. "Shooting 
flying" came into vogue about 1730, when small 
pellets were introduced. The Baron was in Nor- 
folk early in 1800. It can be well understood that 
before the shotgun the net and hawk were in use 
for taking winged game. Greyhounds could look 
after the hares and other fleet ground game; or the 
goshawk flown at the smaller furred animals. It 
will be understood that the Spanish pointer was 
slow but sure. He was given to pottering and lazi- 
ness, and more steam and dash had to be put into 
him. Still, it is thought, such a dog would be of 
a great deal of service in this country in such thick 
cover, where we find ruffed grouse and woodcock. 
Again as a snipe dog there surely could be worse 
gun dogs than the Spanish pointer. 

Suydenham Edwards, writing over a hundred 
years ago, tells us that the lightest and gayest of 
the Spanish dogs were judiciously crossed with the 
foxhound, the object being to gain courage and fleet- 
ness. The progeny with thin or whiptails were pre- 
ferred, the coarse sterns demonstrating the cross. 
The cross resulted in dogs of considerable courage, 
and then commenced the trouble. Try, today, to get 
a foxhound on scent to stop and stand, and then we 
recognize the difficulty the sportsmen of a century 
ago had to stop the cross-bred Spanish pointer and 
hound in its enthusiasm to chase. The cross, there- 
fore, had its serious disadvantages, for the young 
ones were very hard to break or train. Good point- 
ers were at that time quite expensive. 

There are some who think that the first Spanish 
pointers were introduced into England about the 
years 1600. Col. Thornton, a great sportsman, used 
the foxhound cross late in the eighteenth century, 
A writer in 1803 tells us that pointers "on account 
for their universality and general utility, have been 
so incredibly crossed, recrossed, bred in and bred 
out, to gratify the various opinions (as prompted by 
fancy, caprice, or speculation), that they are now to 
be found of all sires and all qualifications, from the 
slow, short-head, heavy-shouldered remains of the 
original Spanish pointer (who will tire in half a 
day's work) to the cross of in and in with a fox- 
hound, of which none are ever known to tire; many 
of them having speed enough to catch a leveret three 
parts grown, when they jump up before them." 
Pointers forty or fifty years before 1800 were hardly 
ever seen, but entirely white or variegated with 
liver-colored spots, except the then Duke of King- 
ston's black and white pointers, which were consid- 
ered superior to every breed in the kingdom, and 
sold for most extravagant sums after his death. In 
1800, with the constantly increasing attachments to 
Held sports, they were to be seen of every descrip- 
tion in color, from the pure white and a flea-bitten 
blue or grey, to the universal liver color, and a per- 
fect black. 

Of the early pointer foxhound dogs one stands 
out in history as of great prominence and interest. 
This was Dash, the property of the aforesaid Col. 
Thornton. He was styled in reputable print of the 
period as the most remarkable pointer ever known 
up to that time. He was produced by a cross of a 
foxhound with a high-bred pointer bitch; he was 
famous for his style of ranging upon the moors on 
grouse, as well for his superior method of finding, 



which demonstrated a good nose and "bird sense"; 
and when hunting in inclosures for partridges he 
showed an instinct or sagacity that was almost in- 
credible, by constantly going up to the birds with- 
out previous quartering of the ground. All this 
added to his steadiness in backing other dogs, ren- 
dered him, it was supposed, the best pointer up till 
then produced. Dash was traded to Sir Richard Sy- 
mons for eight hundred dollars' worth of champagne 
and Burgundy (which had been bought at the French 
Ambassador's sale at the Court of St. James), a hogs- 
head of claret, an elegant gun, and a pointer, with 
a stipulation that, if any accident befell the dog 
that might render him unfit to hunt, he was to be 
leturned to the colonel at the price of fifty guineas 
($260)). The dog had the misfortune to break his 
leg, and was sent to Col. Thornton, who paid the 
fifty guineas according to agreement, and he was 
afterwards kept as a stallion— with little success, 
however. 

From time to time pointers have improved, and 
now we see the very excellent dogs of the day, some 
of the choicest of the exhibition stock being owned 
by George Bleistein, of Buffalo, N.Y., that gentle- 
man possessing a magnificent lot of American and 
foreign bred dogs, the best of which are Champion 
Mark's Rush, Champion Coronation, and Mall- 
wyd Glory, the last mentioned being an exceed- 
ingly beautiful bitch out of the international cham- 
pion, Coronation. All are capital workers, so in 
them we see that which is required in pointers in 
the way of being useful as well as ornamental. 

Pointers have wonderful pointing instinct, and are 
easily trained. Standing or pointing game is second 
nature to them, and there surely cannot be a more 
glorious sight than to observe a dog of this breed 
cataleptic on the feather or fur which his olfactory 
organs acquaint him is not far ahead of his nose. 
The young dog will soon range if given his liberty. 
It is unwise to check him at first. So leave him 
alone, or encourage him to go on. Then he may 
be taken in hand and taught the rudiments of his 
stopping and standing in some smaller enclosed 
space, even if it be under a roof. But let him have 
confidence. In training him do not break his heart 
and smash his spirits. In teaching him to retrieve 
a soft yarn ball may be used, throwing it short dis- 
tances indoors at first. Or better still is a stuffed 
rabbit-skin. By pressing the underjaw from un- 
underneath with the right hand forefinger and 
thumb, the dummy game will be released without 
any trouble. Make a kindly fuss over the dog, and 
he will enjoy the lesson as much as you do the 
teaching. But a few minutes at a time is plenty. 
If this cold-blooded lesson be persisted in for a 
lengthy period he will become tired and nauseated. 

It is not too much to say that the best show point- 
ers in the world are in America today. The thou- 
sands of field dogs are evidence of the excellence 
of the stock, which, of course, originally came from 
the other side. The "natives" of the south, as they 
were called, were the early pointers, and good, 
steady and staunch dogs they were. They were 
slower hunters than the field trial dogs of this mo- 
ment, in which competitions "pace" is worshipped 
at its utmost. In fact, a trial between two dogs 
is styled "a race," a misnomer we are bound to 
remark. "The race is to the swift," and such a term 
must be applied to long dogs — greyhounds, or their 
like, that use their eyes and legs and not their 
noses. Great speed does not always mean a faithful 
unerring quest. 

Pointers have flourished in every way that can 
be desired in the United States and Canada, and 
they prove to be of more than ordinary interest at 
shows and trials. They are possessed by rich and 
those of moderate means. They are the gun dogs 
of all gun dogs to some. Both the Westminster Ken- 
nel Club (which then went in for dogs and kept up 
a kennel) and the St. Louis Kennel Club were great 
importers of pointers in the seventies. Both, as dog 
•owners, have declined in their fancies. In the eigh- 
ties the great Graphic kennels became famous, called 
after the English champion of that name. The best 
dogs in good looks and work were from time to time 
acquired, and sportsmen all over the union today 
have to thank the early importers of the leading 
quality for what they at present own. From 76 to 
'86 are records of the arrival of such pointers as 
Sensation (thought not to be the real Sensation, 
prominent on the other side), Sleaford, Pride, Rock, 
Beau, Faust, Jaunty, Zeal, Lassie, Regent, Irme, 
Keswick, Jessamine, Lady Rapid, Stella, Countess 
Lena, Donald, Maxim, Meteor, Mita, Christmas Belle, 
Luck, Don, Burstone, Graphic, Nell of Klford, Jetsam. 
Bloomo, Bracket, Meally, Revel III, Lad of Bow, 
lieppo III, Lass of Bow, Naso of Knppen, Glauca. 

Champion Marks Rush was bred by F. E. 
Conlon. He is by Mark C, from Bessie C, and 
was whelped in 1900. Many hundreds of pointers are 
exhibited throughout the country, from east to west 
every year. Almost without exception they are of 
sterling merit. 

The colors of pointers are various. TIih most 
popular as show dogs are liver and white and lemon 
and white. They can be seen in the field, and some 
say that game will lie better to them than to a self- 
colored dog. There are a few good blacks in Amer- 
ica, a brace that are doing very well being recently 
imported by Mr. Burrell. Geo. J. Gould is a fast 
adherent to the merits of the pointer, and of the 
breed keeps up a large kennel. Clarence Mackey sus- 
tains quite an establishment of them in America and 
Scotland. Ancell Ball is a large owner. 

Coming to the show points of a British pointer we 
like to see him with a head that is long rather than 
short, with a skull that is decently wide between 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 



the ears. Here is the brain box, and the long grey- 
hound head is not desired. Because of the "stop" 
the brows are well developed, and the same may 
be said of the back of the head, although the more 
than prominent occipital bone is not required. The 
muzzle must necessarily be long and the nostrils 
large. The ears are always very beautiful, being 
so delicate in leather, set on low, and hanging fiat to 
the sides of the head. The neck ought to be free 
irom throatiness, although some of the best field 
dogs known have owned such points that denote the 
old hound relationship. The sloping shoulders dem- 
onstrate freedom of action and good pace. The well- 
made body of the pointer is an ideal one. Its 
strength and formation of ribs are pronounced. The 
forelegs are well set under him, and they are round, 
straight and well boned. The feet are compact 
and strong. These may be either of the cat-foot or 
hare-foot description. But the majority of people 
are in favor of the cat-foot, so called, because of its 
round formation. The hind quarters are deep, well 
muscled, and full of strength, as are his short loin-;. 
His hocks are well let down, and the stifles round 
and strong. The tail, for choice, is a three-quarter 
one, tapering from butt to tip. The true carriage of 
the British pointer is straight out or with an incli- 
nation to be slightly below the level of the rump. 
The general classification at shows is for dogs 55 
lb. weight and over, and bitches 50 lb. weight and 
over. These are known as the "large-sized," the 
"small-sized" being dogs under 55 lb. weight and 
bitches under 50 lb. weight. 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 

Last Sunday was a big day on the Austin pocl 
near Duncan's Mills. At least 30 boats carrying 
one to three anglers were in the pool. Nearly 
twice that number of small craft were operating 
up and down Russian river nearby. It was a day's 
steelhead fishing, that will be remembered for years 

Many fish were taken, nearly everybody caught 
one or more. Some anglers, however, did not get 
even a nibble all day long, whilst ( thers in the 
same boat would catch one or more big steelheads. 

The river was clear up to last Monday, when the 
anticipated roily water caused by the rainfall 
began to show up. The rains this week will prob- 
ably end the great sport. At all events, for the 
past three weeks the steelhead anglers have en- 
joyed the best fishing Russian river has offered 
for fifteen years past. 

The week-end rodsters last Saturday were off in 
force on the train to Duncan's Mills. Having kept tab 
on the game during the week, the possibility of rain 
last week, as the weather clerk intimated, was not 
a deterrent agent. 

Among the lucky anglers Tuesday and Wednes- 
day last week was Manuel Cross, four fish one day 
and five the next morning. Emil Medau and Harry 
Behr's Wednesday and Thursday angling resulted in 
four and one fish respectively. Medau's largest trout 
scaled eighteen pounds. The anglers find salmon 
roe bait on their hooks the best lure. Last Satur- 
day's roster — and the following day and during the 
past week — included Dr. .1. Auburn Wiborn, Hugh 
Copeland, Lruis Getthelf, .1. Eisenbruck, W. D. 
Burlingame, Al Wilson, Bob Sangster, Dr. Raynes, 
Dr. B. F. Alden, J. P. Babcock, L. Gould, Captain 
Watts, J. Parmeter, Fred Schmidt, P. McCluir, J. 
McLachlan, R. Patterson, Louis Boutellier, Ralph 
Lacoste, Fred D. Sanborn, W. H. Hillegass, E. 
Medau, H. Behr, M. Cross and others. 

Anglers have recently made the comparison that 
the large run of steelhead in Russian river has not 
been interfered with by net fishing. Nets and 
seines can not be used in any of the creeks or 
streams of Sonoma county. Paper Mill creek, in 
Marin county, has been almost barren of steelhead, 
which fish, it is claimed, should now be numerous 
in the creek. Seining steelhead in Tomales bay is 
regarded as the principal reason for the absence of 
the coast troat in the creek. 

Paper Mill creek is reported to have plenty of 
water since the rains. Salmon have been seen work- 
ing up as far as Lagunitas creek. These fish will 
struggle up stream in comparatively little water. 
Steelhead trout, on the contrary, will wait in the 
tide waters until they can get enough water to run 
upstream to spawning ground comfortably. 

Salmon, with the exception of a male fish now 
and then, perish after spawning. These fish are 
often seen on or near the spawning beds so bat- 
tered and worn from the upriver struggle as to be 
scarcely able to perform the natural spawning func- 
tions. The kelt gradually works down stream to 
salt water again. The steelhead, on the contrary, 
is a game and fastidious fish, it journeys upstream 
when conditions are right, spawns and returns to 
salt water none the worse for wear. 

The Paper Mill creek waters offer inducement 
now for the steelhead angler, it is claimed. A week 
ago E. H. Humphreys, Frank Bollivar, George Uri, 
Floyd Spence, F. Smith, Joe Uri and other anglers 
found a number of one and two pound fish in the 
creek. Charles Isaacs and others fishing on Thurs- 
day, when the sun was shining brightly on the banks 
of the "white house" pool also discovered the pres- 
ence of the steelhead. Several salmon have been 
taken in the creek within the past week. 

J. Boshoff, writing from Pescadero Friday last, re- 
ported a run of grilse in the Pascadero lagoon. 
These fish range from one up to three and a half 
pounds in weight. Clarence Haywood of San Mateo 
and other anglers have been getting nicec atches. 



A catch of twelve last Wednesday was one angler's 

luck. 

Steelhead are reported plentiful off the mouth of 
the Soquel, near Capitola. 

Striped bass activities seem to be confined, at 
present, to Russian river, in the vicinity of Duncan's 
Mills. Since the steelhead anglers have been oper- 
ating in the Austin pool striped bass have been fre- 
quently seen, many of these being very large fish. 

Last Wednesday about fifteen big bass were 
caught while the fish were trying to work up stream 
over the Austin pool riffle. The two heaviest fish 
scaled fifty and thirty pounds respectively. One 
day last week a forty-five pounder was sent to this 
city. 

The method in vogue for taking these practically 
impounded fish is by using a heavy hand line rigged 
with numerous triple hooks and a sinker. The 
deadly contrivance is thrown out and dragged 
through the water over the fish, which are "snagged" 
the bass being hooked any old way and yanked to 
shore. This system is in use with market fishermen 
only. 

San Antonio slough, unproductive for many weeks, 
threw off the incubus Wednesday, when Gus Chris- 
tianson and M. Miller were trolling, and produced 
two fine bass, twenty and thirty pound fish. 

With favorable weather ensuing the sport in both 
San Antone and VVingo resorts should improve, that 
is, if the January results of different past season are 
any guide. 

o 

THE PASSING OF A PIONEER SPORTSMAN. 

Robert Liddle, one of the pioneer gunsmiths in 
this city, passed away in Oakland last Sunday. "Bob" 
Liddle was a prominent figure among the sportsmen 
of two generations ago who would not put the mark 
of approval on any sporting goods that did not come 
from the gun store of Liddle & Kaeding, which was 
located, from about 1860 to the early '80's, on Wash- 
ington street, below Mcntgomery, that part of the 
city then being the center of retail business in San 
Francisco. 

Liddle was a skilled expert in gunsmithing. At 
the age of 88 he survived all of his family in this 
city except a grandson, Bob Liddle. 

o 

AT THE TRAPS. 



The two-man team bluerock Northwest tourna- 
ment, between trade representatives, started aus- 
piciously at Ashland last Tuesday. The progress 
of the shoot is given below in press dispatches re- 
ceived daily: 

Ashland, Ore., Jan. 15. — Cold weather and newly 
erected traps interfered with the first day's shoot 
of the Northern tournament at the trap shooting 
which, under the auspices of the Ashland Gun Club, 
commenced at Ashland today. The Seattle and Ta- 
coma representatives failed to appear, leaving the 
competition to San Francisco, Portland and Spo- 
kane. Scores were: 

San Francisco — Fred Willet 91, Ike Fisher 77. 
Total 168. 

Portland— Jim Reid 75, H. E. Poston 74. Total 149. 

Medford, Ore., Jan. 16. — All the teams shot bet- 
ter in the American Sportsmen Association's tour- 
nament, held here under the auspices of the Medford 
Gun Club, today. The scores were as follows: 

San Francisco— Willet 93, Fisher 96. Total 189. 

Portland— Holohan 92, Robertson 91. Total 183. 

Spokane— Poston 95, Reid 77. Total 162. 

Roseburg, Ore., Jan. 17. — By the narrow margin 
of four points the San Francisco team of trapshoot- 
ers won out again on the third day of the North- 
western tournament, which was held here under the 
auspices of the Roseburg Gun Club today. 

Fred Willet's remarkable shooting gave San 
Francisco the advantage, for he broke 55 consecu- 
tive targets and scoring 95 breaks for his string 
of 100. The scores today were: 

San Francisco— Willet 95, Fisher 89. Total 184. 

Portland— Holohan 88, Robertson 92. Total 180. 

Spokane— Poston 76, Reid 78. Total 154. 

San Francisco now leads the tourney by twenty- 
three breaks. The next shoot was billed for yes- 
terday at Eugene. 



President E. J. Chingren and Secretary Frank C. 
Riehl of the Pacific Indians have set July 8th to 
12th as the date, for the organization's next shoot, 
which will be held at Eugene, Ore, this year. There 
will be $2000 added money offered at the tourna- 
ment and the crack trap shooters of the West are 
expected to participate in force. 



Good Ammunition. — J. E. Gorman's great pistol 
record — the top notch score in the United States 
to date— was made with long rifle .22 Stevens-Pope 

semi smokeless cartridges. 

According to reports received and compiled by 
Biers Koch, supervisor of the Lolo national forest, 
513 deer and 15 bears were killed by hunters on 
the National reserve during the last hunting season. 
These figures represent information gathered by the 
rangers and are reliable. The rangers reported only 
such numbers killed as they personally knew about. 
This is the largest number of deer slain in the 
Lolo reserve in years. In fact, the records show no 
year which approaches the figures of the slain for 
this year. This year's total is greater than the 
totals of the last three years combined. 



FISH AND GAME COMMISSION SEIZURES. 

Alas for the St. Francis Sunday dinners of rare 
game which were to be, but were not. Also pity the 
rare diners who were to have ordered "Owl" with a 
sly wink to the waiter, but did not. 

For the St. Francis kitchen was raided last Sat- 
urday night by deputies of the Fish and Game Com- 
missioners. Into the kitchen of the newly made 
Cammissioner of Police they walked proudly and 
opened the door of the cold storage room to the 
dismay of the chef. 

What did they find? 

Here is the list: Twenty-three curlew and twenty- 
one English snipe which were to have been cooked 
for gourmets Sunday who had to satisfy their ap- 
petite with Petaluma pullets. 

Such a bunch of illegal dead birds has not fallen 
into the clutches of the law for many a day. But 
be it remembered that Manager James Woods, who 
was only the other day selected as a guardian of 
the law on the Board of Police Commissioners, was 
away in Los Angeles. If he had been here of course 
it never would have happened. Still, it is an un- 
usual thing to raid the kitchen of a Police Commis- 
sioner and contrary to all the customs of official 
good form. 

It was 3:30 Saturday afternoon when two innocent 
looking persons presented themselves at the desk of 
the St. Francis and stated that they were hotel men 
from the country anxious to see how a metropoli- 
tan hotel was conducted in its different departments. 
The idea was a good one. The country hotel proprie- 
tors were soon being shown the different depart- 
ments of the house, and among them the kitchen. 

Once in the kitchen they dropped their rural dis- 
guise and walked straight to the ccld storage room. 
The personally conducted tour turned in a jiffy into 
a full sized raid. At the same moment four other 
fish and game deputies walked into the kitchen from 
the Geary street entrance, and the six of them 
showed the urbane assistant manager an unexpected 
particular in the way a metropolitan hotel is some- 
times conducted. 

The evidence could not get away. Unlike the four 
and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie, the dead 
curlew and snipe did not fly away, although the 
chef and the assistant manager wished they would. 

Seldom has a hunt resulted in such a fine bag of 
game. What need to have got up early and gone 
afield with shotgun and dogs, when all the while 
right here in the cold storage room in the St. Fran- 
cis was game to satisfy an epicure, even with the 
most illicit taste. 

But really one never knows where to hunt for 
game, and the management of the St. Francis ex- 
presses surprise that the spot has been d'i>u.vered 
in the St. Francis kitchen. 

With due regard to Manager Woods' alibi the law 
will insist on its satisfaction, and the penalty set 
down in the statute book is a fine of from $20 to 
$500 and imprisonment. Anyone with mathemat- 
ical tastes can figure how much that comes to for 
twenty-three curlew and twenty-cne saipe, or if 
there is any difficulty the question could be settled 
by the judge. 

John Tait's kitchen next came in for inspection, 
with the result that twenty-seven ixninds of under- 
sized crawfish were discovered and seized by the 
deputies. 

A careful search of nineteen different cold storage 
nooks in the Palace Hotel kitchen followed, but if 
they had been the place of captivity of any rare 
birds the deputies did not find them. 

At Jules' restaurant fifty-seven ducks, more than 
the law allows, and six quail, ostensibly to be served 
to guests which is quite illegal, were discovered. 

Michael Debret had fifty-four ducks and sixteen 
quail ready for Sunday's feasts, and Techau Tavern 
was supplied with thirty-five ducks, when the law 
allows but twenty-five. 

"The eating public of San Francisco demands too 
much from the restaurant men," was the comment 
of Ernest Schaelfle, secretary of the Fish and Game 
Commission. But the eating public ate more wisely 
if not so well Sunday. 

It was a great hunt. 

o 

There are over 200 residents of Spokane making a 
good living catching whitefish in the lakes in the 
Inland Empire according to Secretarry Al Wieseman 
of the Spokane Fish Protective Association. He 
added: "For men who are out of work I do not 
know of a better chance to make a good living 
than catching whitefish for the market. There is 
a big demand for the fish and with prices the same 
as they are now any person can make good wages 
angling through the ice. Loon and Deer lakes are 
full of the fish and with the expenditure of less than 
$2 any person can go into the business. At Sand- 
point there are at least 100 Spokane fishermen mak- 
ing good money. The whitefish are fine for the 
table, and as they are easily caught it is no trick 
to make $5 a day. 



Trap, gun and strychnine lowered the coyote popu- 
lation of Spokane county by 148 members during 
1911, according to records prepared by J. S. Bishop, 
deputy county auditor. At least the State paid $1 
a head for the scalps of that many prairie wolves 
and, in addition, paid $5 apiece for relics cf seven 
lynx, all killed within the district. The figures com- 
pare well with those of 1910, when about 450 coyote 
hides were displayed in the office. The lynx crop 
fell off somewhat, for 12 of the animals were killed 
during that period, and one mountain lion. 



Saturday, January 20, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE NEW STALLION REGISTRATION LAW. 

An Act to regulate the public service of stallions 
and jacks in the State of California. — [Approved 
May 1, 1911.] 

The attention of all horsemen is called to the follow- 
ing. It is in force and must be complied with: 

The People of the State of California, represented 
in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Every association, person, firm or cor- 
poration standing or offering any stallion or jack 
for public service in this State shall cause the name, 
description, and pedigree of such stallion or jack to 
be enrolled by a stallion registration board herein- 
after provided for, and secure a license from said 
board, as provided in section 3 of this act. All en- 
rollments and verifications of pedigree shall be done 
in the office of the secretary of the California State 
Board of Agriculture. All license certificates for stal- 
lions or jacks issued under this act shall thereupon 
be presented to and recorded by the county recorder 
of the county or counties in which said stallion or 
jack is used for public service. 

Sec. 2. In order to carry out the provisions of this 
act. there shall be constituted a stallion registration 
board, whose duty it shall be to verify and register 
pedigrees; to pass upon certificates of veterinary ex- 
amination: to issue stallion or jack license certificates; 
to make all necessary rules and regulations; and to 
perform such other duties as may be necessary to 
carry out and enforce the provisions of this act. Said 
board shall hold meetings at tiie office of the Secre- 
tary of the California State Board of Agriculture the 
first Tuesday and subsequent days of February, May, 
August, and November of each year, and such other 
meetings as may be necessary. 

Said stallion registration board shall be composed 
of three members, consisting of the president and sec- 
retary of the California State Board of Agriculture, 
and the State Veterinarian. 

Sec. 3. In order to obtain the license certificate 
herein provided for, the owner of eacli stallion or jack 
shall forward an affidavit signed by a licensed veter- 
inarian to the effect that he has personally examined 
such stallion or jack, and that, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, said stallion or jack, is free 
from hereditary, infectious, contagious, or transmis- 
sible disease or unsoundness. The owner of said stal- 
lion, or jack shall also furnish to the stallion regis- 
tration board the stud book certificate of registry of 
the pedigree of the said stallion or jack when said 
stallion or jack is registered, and all other necessary 
papers relative to his breeding and ownership. Upon 
verification of pedigree and certificate of breeding (in 
case of pure-bred stallions and jacks), and receipt 
of veterinarian's affidavit, as provided for in this act, 
a license certificate shall be issued to the owner. 

Sec. 4. The presence of any one of the following 
named diseases shall disqualify a stallion or jack 
for public service, and the examining or inspecting 
veterinarian is hereby duly authorized to refuse to 
give an affidavit of soundness to the owner of such 
stallions or jacks affected with any one or more of 
the diseases herein specified in a transmissible or 
hereditary form, and the examining or inspecting vet- 
erinarian 'shall so report the same to the secretary of 
the stallion registration board: 

Larynygeal hemiplegia, (roaring or whistling); pul- 
monary emphysema, (heaves, broken wind); chorea, 
(St. Vitus' dance, crampiness, shivering, stringhalt); 
bone spavin; ringbone; sidehone; navicular disease; 
osteoporosis; curb, when accompanied with faulty 
conformation of hock; glanders, farcy; maladie du 
coif, urethal gleet; mange, or any contagious or in- 
fectious disease, and the said board is hereby author- 
ized to refuse its certificate of enrollment for any 
stallion or jack affected with any one of the diseases 
herein above mentioned and to revoke the previously 
issued enrollment certificate of any stallion or jack 
found on subsequent examination and investigation 
to be so affected. 

Sec. 5. The stallion registration board shall make 
and keep records of all stallions and jacks enrolled in 
the State of California; said stallions or jacks to be 
enrolled as "pure-bred." "cross-bred," "non-standard 
bred," "grade," or "mongrel." according as the facts 
may have been determined. 

Upon making the enrollment of said stallion or jack, 
said stallion registration board shall issue the above 
said license. 

The stallion registration board is authorized, in 
cases of emergency, to grant temporary license certifi- 
cates without veterinary examination, upon receipt of 
an affidavit of the owner to the effect that, to the 
best of his knowledge and belief said stallion or jack 
is free from infectious, contagious, or transmissible 
disease or unsoundness. Temporary license certificate 
shall be valid only until veterinary examination can 
reasonably be made. 

Sec. 6. The owner of any stallion or jack used for 
public service in this State shall post and keep affixed, 
during the entire breeding season, copies of the license 
certificate of such stallion or jack, issued under the 
provisions of this act, in a conspicuous place, both 
within and upon the outside of the main door leading 
to every stable or building where the said stallion or 
jack is used for public service. 

Each bill and poster and each newspaper adver- 
tisement shall show the enrollment certificate number, 
and state whether it reads "pure-bred," "grade," 
"cross-bred," "non-standard bred" or "mongrel" and 
•it shall be illegal to print or advertise any mislead- 
ing reference to the breeding of said stallion or jack, 
h^s dam or his sire. 

Sec. 7. The license certificate issued for a stallion 
or Jack whose sire and dam are of pure breeding, ami 
the pedigree of which is registered in a stud book 
recognized by the United States Department of Ag- 
riculture, Washington, D. C, an act regulating the im- 
portation of breeding animals, approve! March 3, 
1903, shall be in the following form; 

California stallion Registration Board. 

Certificate of pure-bred stallion or jack No 

The pedigree of the stallion of jack (Name) 

Owned by 

Bred by 

Described as follows: 

Color Breed 

Foaled in the year has been duly ex- 

amined, and it is hereby certified that the said 

stallion or jack is registered as number 

in stud book, said stud book being 

recognized and certified to by the Secretary of 
the Department of Agriculture, Washington. D. C, 
and is of pure breeding. The above named stal- 
lion or jack has been examined by 

veterinarian, and is reported as free from infec- 
tious, contagious or transmissible disease or un- 
soundness and Is 

licensed to stand for public service In the State of 
California. 

This license expires on 19.... 

(Signed) 

Secretary California Stallion Registration 
Board. 

Dated this 19... at Sacramento, Cal. 



The license certificate issued for a grade stallion or 
jack, whose sire or dam is not pure-bred, shall be in 
the following form: 

California Stallion Registration Board. 

Certificate of grade stallion or jack, No 

The pedigree of the stallion or jack (name) 

Owned by 

Bred by 

Described as follows: 

Color 

Foaled in the year has been duly ex- 
amined, and it is hereby certified that the said 
stallion or jack is not of pure breeding and is, 
therefore, not eligible for registration in any stud 
book recognized and certified to by the Secretary 
of the Department of Agriculture. Washington. 
D. C. The above named stallion has been exam- 
ined by 

veterinarian, and is reported as free from infec- 
tious contagious, or transmissible disease or un- 
soundness 

and is licensed to stand for public service in the 
State of California. 

This license expires on 19.... 

(Signed) 

Secretary California Stallion Registration 
Board. 

Dated this 19 at Sacramento, Cal. 

The license certificate issued for a stallion whose 
sire and dam are pure-bred, but not of the same breed, 
shall be in the following form: 

California stallion Registration Board. ' 

Certificate of cross-bred stallion No 

The pedigree of the stallion (name) 

Owned by 

Bred by 

Described as follows: 

Color 

Foaled in the year has been duly ex- 

amined, and it is found that his sire is registered 

in the 

stud book as number volume 

at page and his dam in the 

stud book as number volume 

and page 

Such being the case, the said stallion is not eli- 
sible for registration in any stud book recognized 
and certified to by the Secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. The 
above named stallion has been examined by 

veterinarian, and is reported as 

free from infectious, contagious or transmissible 

disease or unsoundness 

and is licensed to stand for p lblic service in fie 
State of California. 

This license expires on 19.... 

(Signed) 

Secretry California Stallion Registration 
Board. 

Dated this 19 at Sacramento, Cal. 

The license certificate issued for a non-standard 
bred stallion shall be in the following form: 

California Stallion Registration Board. 

Certificate of non-standard bred stallion, No 

The pedigree of the stallion (name) 

Owned by •. . ft . 

Bred by 

Described as follows: 

Color 

Foaled in the year has been duly ex- 

amined and it is hereby certified and found that 
said stallion is not eligible to registration as 
standard-bred, and for the purpose of this license 
is not pure-bred, although recorded in the non- 
standard department of the American trotting 
register. 

The above stallion has been examined by 

veterinarian, and is reported as free from 

infectious, contagious or transmissible disease or 

unsoundness 

and is licensed to stand for public service in the 
State of California. 

This license expires on 19 

(Signed) 

Secretary California Stallion Registration 
Board. 

Dated this 19 at Sacramento, Cal. 

California Stallion Registration Hoard. 

Certificate of "mongrel" stallion or jack No 

The pedigree, as far as known or traced, of the 

stallion or jack (name) 

Owned by 

Bred by 

Described as follows: 

Color i 

Foaled in the year r has been duly ex- 
amined, and it is hereby certified that the said 
stallion or jack is of. mongrel breeding, and is 
not eligible for registration in any stud book 
recognized and certified to by the Secretary of 
the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

The above named stallion has been examined by 

veterinarian, and is reported as free 

from infectious, contagious, or transmissible dis- 
ease or unsoundness 

and is licensed 

to stand for public service in the State of Cali- 
fornia. 

This license expires on 19.... 

(Signed) 

Secretary California Stallion Registration 
Board. 

Dated this 19 at Sacramento, Cal. 

Sec. 8. A fee of $2.f)0 shall be paid to the secretary 
of the California stallion registration board for the 
examination and enrollment of each stallion or jack 
pedigree, and for issuance of a license certificate In 
accordance with the breeding of the stallion or jack 
as above provided, which shall be in force and effect 
for a period of one year, from its date, and for the 
purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act. 
The fee shall be paid to the secretary of the Califor- 
nia stallion registration board at the time the appli- 
cation Is made for enrollment. 

I'pon a transfer of the ownership of any stallion or 
jack enrolled under the provisions of this act, the cer- 
tificate of enrollment may be transferred to the trans- 
feree by the secretary of the California stallion regis- 
tration board, upon submittal of satisfactory proof 
of such transfer of ownership, and upon payment of 
a fee of $1.00. A fee of $1.00 shall be paid annually 
for the renewal of a license certificate. 

A fee of $1.00 shall be paid for a duplicate license 
certificate, upon proof of the loss or destruction of 
the original certificate. 

Sec. 9. Every stallion or jack for which a license 
has been Issued shall be exempt from further exami- 
nation, unless from later developments it becomes 
known, and a complaint Is filed, certified to by three 
men, one of whom shall be a licensed veterinarian; 
that said stallion or jack has some hereditary, 
contagious, or Infectious disease, which was not 
evident at the time of previous examination. 
When such complaint is made, and a request for ex- 
amination Is asked, such complaint shall be filed with 
the secretary of the California stallion registration 
board, who shall have another examination made, but. 



the owner of the stallion or Jack shall have the right 
to select a veterinarian legally qualified to practice 
as such in this State, to act with such examining 
veterinary, and in case these two shall fall to agree 
upon a verdict or decision these two veterinarians 
shall appoint a third qualified veterinarian, with the 
consent and approval of said board and owner, who 
shall act as referee therein, and the decision of said 
referee shall be final. If such complaint is found to 
be correct it shall be so reported to the secretary 
who shall revoke the license in force; provided, that 
the owner of any stallion used for public service in 
this State shall have a lien on all colts sired by said 
stallion for the service fee for a period of one year 
from the date of the foaling of said colt, as now 
provided by law. 

Sec. 10. Every association, person, firm or corpora- 
tion violating any of the provisions of tills act, shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be punished by 
a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars ($100) for 
each offense; or by imprisonment in the countv jail 
not exceeding fifty days, or by both such fine and im- 
prisonment. 

Sec. 11. The funds accruing from the above named 
fees shall be used by the said stallion registration 
board to defray the expenses of enrollment of pedi- 
grees and issuance of licenses; to provide for the ex- 
amination of stallions and jacks, when necessary; to 
publish reports or bulletins containing lists of stal- 
lions and jacks examined, which shall be not less than 
one in each year; to encourage the horse-breeding in- 
terests in this State; to disseminate information per- 
taining to horse breeding, and for any other pur- 
poses as may be necessary to carry out the purposes 
and enforce the provisions of tills act. Each member 
of the above committee shall receive his actual ex- 
penses incurred while in the performance of any duty 
imposed under the provisions of this act; the secre- 
tary of said board shall receive for his services an 
amount to be fixed and agreed upon by said board. 

It shall be the duty of the said stallion registration 
board to enforce the provisions of this act, and to 
make an annual report, including financial statement, 
to the governor of the State, on September 15th of 
each year. 

Sec. 12. This act shall take effect and be in force on 
August 1st, 1911. 

TRACING TO IMPORTED MESSENGER. 



Captain Tom Merry (Hidalgo) has written a very 
interesting article for the Pacific Horse and Horse- 
man's Review on Imported Messenger which contains 
the following; 

"This article is written by a man who has devoted 
more time and study to thoroughbreds than to light- 
harness horses. It is not written, however, to show 
the value of thoroughbred blood in the trotter so 
much as to show the real value of Messenger as a 
sire of horses, both at the galloping game and in light 
harness. The following great racers and stallions on 
the running turf since 1870, have the number of 
crosses of Imported Messenger set opposite their 
names, to-wit: 

Longfellow 2 Borghesi 2 

Enquirer 1 Billy Cheatham 2 

Falsetto 2 Carmargo 2 

Fellowcraft 1 Gallatin 2 

Silendthrift 1 Con Cregan 2 

Artidille 1 Fortuna 2 

Muggins 2 Grace Murray 2 

Modesty 2 Spokane 2 

Virgil 1 Inauguration 2 

Now, this list of eighteen horses does not at first 
look so formidable, but there are in it some things 
worthy of consideration. To begin with, Longfellow 
and Enquirer were two out of the five best sons of 
Leamington, considered as sires, the former being 
premier sire of America in 1891, while the latter, 
though never at the head of the list, got a greater 
number of winners than any other stallion in Ameri- 
can history. Virgil was also a premier sire and he 
and Falsetto are the only two stallions to get three 
winners of the Kentucky Derby. Spokane won three 
Derbys in 1889, being second once to Proctor Knott 
and once to Salvator in that year and winning nine 
races out of eleven. Falsetto, a great performer and 
brother to Fortuna, the only mare to beat Bramble 
at cup distances, was by long odds the best male line 
grandson of Leamington. Spendthrift was never first 
on the list but got two stallions — Hastings and King- 
ston — that were each premiers for two seasons. Billy 
Cheatham won a two-mile heat race at Sacramento in 
1860 and challenged the whole Pacific Coast, a banter 
that met with no response. Borghesi holds the Pa- 
cific Coast record, 3:27y 2 , for two miles, and Modesty 
is the only mare ever to win the American Derby at 
Chicago. 

Absorbing: fob w teak inkles. 



A BSORB1NE is an excellent preparation to 
strengthen weak ankles, take out soreness and lame- 
ness, overcome Inflammation, The report received 
from Robert A. Fulton, Tlonesta, I'a., June 12, 1911. 
was as follows: "I have used your Absorblne for 
years and find It excellent. Used It on a horse with 
a weak ankle and got fine results and am never 
without it." 

Absorblne is a soothing liniment, only a little re- 
quired at each application. Use It for Bog Spavin, 
Tboroughpln, Shoe Boils, Capped Mocks. Inflamma- 
tion and soreness anywhere. At druggists. $2.00 a 
bottle or sent direct, charges prepaid, upon receipt of 
price Write for descriptive pamphlet, sent free 
upon request. W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 54 Temple 
Street, Springfield, Mass. 

o 

(lOOl) I'OH \ CI BK. 



There Is no point In advertising a remedy unless 
it is worth something. There Is no use in charging 
a dollar a bottle for a remedy unless the remedy 
is good for a cure. We are both advertising Quinn's 
Ointment and charging a dollar a bottle for it be- 
cause we know It will cure a curb, splint, spavin, 
wlndpuff, or any other enlargement. Mr. W. W. 
Bird, Leadmine, Wis., writes: "Enclosed please find 
a dollar for a bottle of Quinn's Ointment. Please 
send as soon as possible, as I have none at present 
and would not be without It. It Is the best Ointment 
on the market and I have been using It for twelve 
years. It has saved me hundreds of dollars in horse- 
flesh." Such a testimonial proves the value of our 
remedy. Address W. II. EDDY' & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 



DID YOU EVER? 



Did you ever figure up the number of 
acres in your farm devoted to pasture, 
then the number of cows and young 
stock it supports? Then, did you figure 
what that pasture land is worth as a 
part of your farm at going prices of 
land? Then, when this was done, did 
you figure from all those figures just 
what it is costing you to pasture your 
cows? In this section, where land is 
worth over $100 per acre, we know of 
plenty of pastures that require five acres 
to the cow. That is the interest at 5 per 
cent or $2"> per cow for pasture. Take 
up your own farm, where you know just 
what are the facts, and figure it out. 



A small investment will fix up al- 
most any stable with a few more win- 
dows, a coat of whitewash and ventil- 
ating-shafts, which will add greatly 
to the pleasure and profit of the dairy 
work. 

Wheat-bran is a good dairy-feed, and 
generally speaking, it is a good sup- 
plement to other grain-feeds. 



Show Horse ! 

Race Horse M 



Sire ! ! ! 



The Standard Trotting Stallion 

LIJERO 2:15i Re* n< 

Sired bv James Madison 2:17% (son 
of Anteeo*2:16M>). sire of IS in 2:30 list, 
iniludins Brilliant 2:0SV 4 . Tuna 2:08M:. 
Emily W. 2:10; dam Hilda (dam of Wil- 
liam Albert 2:16%. a sire, Saint Am- 
brose 2:25, and IJjero 2:l- r >Vi. a sire). by- 
Nutwood 2:18%, the world's champion 
broodmare sire; second dam Kudora by 
Volunteer, the greatest sire of race 
horses that ever lived: third dam by 
American Star 14, the sire whoso 
daughters have produced 43 trotters 
and among them some of our greatest 
sires. 

IJjero is a brown stallion foaled in 
1902. stands 16.1, and weighs 1200 
pounds. He sired Kxpedio (3) 2:14Vi- 
Public trial at Chico as a four-year-old 
in 2:08%. Lijero forced Prince Lot 
2:09% to trot in 2:10H at Woodland in 
1910 and was only beaten a head. He 
started in five races, won throe and was 
second in the other two, and it gave 
Helen Stiles 2:08>4 and Prince Lot 2:09% 
all they could do to beat him in those 
two races. Very few horses have ever 
trotted in 2:10 with less work than 
Lijero. He should race in 2:08 this 
year. He has everything to recommend 
him as a game racehorse and as a sire 
he will undoubtedly be one of the best. 
He has size, style, color, conformation, 
disposition, the best of feet and legs, 
an iron constitution, and the purest 
of trotting action. His gameness is 
unquestioned. He is a perfect show- 
horse and sires show horses. He and 
his daughter Expedio have won first 
prizes i" the standard class at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair. 

limit \ W., registered in Vol. XIX, 
Brown mare. 15.2 hands; foaled 1901. 
Sired by James Madison 2:17%, dam 
Swift Tide by Albert W. 2:20; second 
dam Uarda (dam of Flowing Tide 
2:14%), by Echo; third dam Dewdrop. 
A sure breeder, due to foal to Lijero 
1912. Entered in State Futurity and 
Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

TOOTS \V„ registered. Vol. XIX. Bay 
mare, 15.2 hands; foaled 1907 by Stam 
B. 2:11 Vi. dam Idora W. Due to foal 
to Lijero 1912. This mare is very fast, 
having worked quarters In 35 seconds 
as a two-year-old. Entered in State 
Fair Futurity and Breeders' Futurity 
Stakes. 

JAMES H. DONNELLEY, b. g . 15.3 
hands; foaled 1909. Sired by Lijero 
2:15Vi, dam by Hanford Medium; second 
dam Algerine (dam of Kelly Briggs 
2:08), by Algona, etc. Entered in Breed- 
ers' Futurity and State Fair Futurity. 
With little work this one showed a 
mile in 1911 in 2:28, half in 1:10 and a 
quarter in 33 Vfc seconds. He will make 
a 2:12 or better pacer this year. 

IVA W., b. f.. foaled 1910; sired by 
Prince Ansel 2:20%; dam Idora W. 
(which see). Entered in Breeders' 
Futurity. State Fair Futurity and Oc- 
cident Stake. She is just broken to 
drive and will undoubtedly make a very 
fast mare. She is eligible for registra- 
tion. 

I)H. JOHN, b. c. (1), by Palite (son of 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% and Pallta, 2, 
2:16); dam Toots W. (which see). En- 
tered in State Fair Futurity. Breeders' 
Futurity and Occident Stake. A fine 
lar«o pcrfectlv formed individual, nice- 
ly halter broken. 

These horses are all sound and In 
good condition, ready for anything that 
horses can be used for. The mare 
Toots W., if worked, will make a 2:12 
trotter, or even a lower record than 
this. 

On account of the many demands up- 
on my time In my business, I find I 
cannot devote any to the development 
or care of these, therefore I have de- 
cided to sell them. 

Any further Information regarding 
prices, etc, will be given by addressing 
P. E. WRIGHT, 
318 K. St., Sacramento, Cat. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HITMAN REMKDV for Kheu- 
mallini, .Spmlm, Sore Throat, '• . ic 

la invaluable. 

Every bottle of fanatic Balenm sold Is 
Warranted to jrive satisfaction. Price *j» 1 .."»<> 
per bottlfc. Sold by druir^lsts, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for it9 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE UWRENCE- WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohi' 



In the feeding of calves there is a 
splendid opportunity for a man to ex- 
ercise patience and kindness. 

The fact that so many dairy-farm- 
ers prosper in spite of these methods, 
is convincing proof that the same 
business conducted in a business-like 
way. could be made very profitable. 



Dake's 
Press 
Clipping 
Bureau. 



Newspaper clippings furnished on any 
subject from the press of the Pacific 
Coast. 

CLIPPINGS 

Social, Personal, Political, 
Lodges, Fraternal Orders, 
Business Opportunities. 

Highly Trained Readers. 
Most Careful Service. 
Clippings Mailed Daily. 

Eastern correspondents for a country- 
wide service. 

RATES: 

Under 50 clippings per month, r>c per 
clipping; 50 to 100 clippings per month, 
SL'.oO per month; over 100 clippings per 
month, 23£c per clipping. 
You pay only for what you re- 
ceive. Order now. Stop when 
you please. 



Dake's 
Press 
Clipping 
Bureau 

432 So. Main St., LOS ANGELES 
California. 



KENDALLS SP *" N 



I 



pi 



e. Splint or l.tmenesb. 
For salr.it all (irujrjjfists. Price _ 
1 per bottle, 6 (or $5. "Treatise on the Horse** 
e at (irufririsis or write to Dr. H. J. kfc.MlALL 
10 MP A.N V, Kno-ltury KnllH, Vt., 1 . S. A. 



No 
matter 
how long 
your horse haa 
:en lame, or 
what the nature 
of his lameness, you 
can cure him if you 
useMack's$l 000 Spavin 
Remedy. 

This is the Only Spavin 




FREE DIAGNOSIS COUPON 



Remedy that Is Sold Under a 
$1,000 Bond Guaranteeing a Cure 
1 the Return of Your Money . 

Every Owner, Trainer, or Caretaker 

should keep this remedy constantly at hand and 
use it freely whenever there is any sign or indica- 
on of lameness. 
<s> Mack's $1,000 Spavin Remedy Will Quickly Cure 
ivin, Ringbone, Thoroughpin, Curb, Capped Hock, 
Shoeboil, Sprung Knee, Ruptured Tendons, Sweeny, 
or any one of a hundred different causes of lameness from which 
/our horse may be suffering. 

MACK'S $1,000 SPAVIN CURE 

Relieves Cases Formerly Considered Incurable 

We know of many cases where liorse owners have paid out bit fcc3 and had valuable horses tortured with 
"firm.?," "blistcrini:." and other goud-for-iuithine methods, and as a last resort tried Mack's $1,000 
Spavin Remedy, and were amazed at the painlrss. positive, quick and permanent cure. It doen not leave any 

scar, blemish or loss of hair — absolutely no mark to show that the animal has ever been lame, bate to use on any 

horse, old or younc< It*9 the surest remedy money can buy. 
and it's the only Spavin remedy in the world that is absolutely 
puarantccd by a 

$1,000 WARRANTY BOND 

This is a straightforward business proposition that you can 
not overlook if you have a lame horse. N"t only fur the sake of 
the horse, but for your pockrt-book as well, you should read 
every word of t! is advertisement and then send the coupon w i;h- 
out the Iol s of an hour. I)on"t let your horse suffer, don't sell 
him for a few dollars; ask us to tell you how to remove the lame- 
ness safelv, surely and quickly. 

We will send yon THE BEST AND MOST RELI- 
ABLE DIAGNOSIS ABSOLUTELY FREE. 

All you have to do is to fill out the " Tree Diagnosis 
Coupon,** mark just where your horse has a swelling, sore or 
any one of the hie number t.f possible causes for lameness, and 
send it to us. We will then give the coupon to our practicing 
Veterinary Specialist f.ir his expert diagnosis. This diagnosis is 
invariably correct. We then inform you of the cause of your 
horse's lameness and the remedy that will absolutely cure 
him. We do all this for nothin;:. 

Be Positive, Know What You Are Doing and know 
that you arc treating the right spot in the right wav. ^ Don't dis- 
figure your horse and reduce his market value. Write to us. 
Vour Druggist Will Obtain Mack's 
$1,000 Spavin Remedy for You 

if yon n^k him. Price |Vo» p.-r bottle. If he refuses, remit $5.00 
to us and wo will ;ce that your order is filled without delay. 

No matter where, when or from whom yon buy Mack's 
■ 1,000 Spavin Remedy, the pries il Qm WSM. Kvery bonfls is 
guaranteed, nod is accompanied liy our $1,0U6 Warranty Mad, 
which iasusjs you that your money will he refunded if the remedy 
fails to do all we claim for it, as slated in our guaranty. 

Do accept a substitute, for thore is no other remedy like 
Mack's tl »W Spavin Remedy— nothing m> powerful and tmro to 
cure. It vida supremo as a leuiciy in all forms of lameness. 

McKALLOR DRUG CO. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 




On pietnre 
of hi 

nark with 
an X just 
whoro sv 
ingor la 
now occi 
then clip out 
coupon and 
mail to us with 
a letter, telling 
what caused 
the lam en of p, 
how long horse 
lias been lame, 
how it affects 
the animal's 
gait, ago of 
horse, etc. 
We will tell y. 



just what the lamenesi is.and how to 



relievi it quickly. Absolutely do eharge. Write today, 

r~rea Book-"Hor*e Scnme" 

Send us the Free Diagnosis Coupon, get abso- 
lutely free acupv of our book "Horse -Sense." 
Describes and Illustrates diseases of horses' 
limbs, shows correct name for every part of 
horse and tells valuable facts every horse 
owner ought to know. 



SAVE-THE-HORSE 



REGISTERED U. S. 



PATENT OFFICE. 

yVa/c/scAmiJt' s 





SAVE-TIIE-IIORSE BOOK la an encyclopedia of 
Information. • Covers every scope and character of 
lameness. MAILK1> WITHOUT tll.VUUK. 
r Write for letters from breeders, business men and 
bankers the world over on every kind of case. 

You will then understand why we give an Ironclad 
contract to euro or refund money. This contract has 
S6U.0OO paid up capital back of it to secure and make its 
promise good. Bend for copy. 

BU.N'KER-CULLER LUMBER COMPANY. 
Capital Paid Up »250,000. 

BUNKER. MISSOURI. Oct. 14, 1911.— Troy Chemical Co., 
Binghamton, N. Y. — Havinf. tried SaY»-Tho-Horee to oar satie- 
fsctionon s bog ipsria, we hare called in another mule with 
a borf. Send another bottle : encloae $5.00. 

BUNKKR-CULLIK LUMBER CO. S. J. BUNKER, President. 



^Practical jftorsetfiotrt .Carol's' >*»»•• 
693 So.H .7XW St~.t <V««i»«e.- 0*tt. 
Oct. 27. Ull— Troy Chemical Co., Blnrhamton. N. I.— H yoo 
rememlier, in March, 1910. 1 wrote retards my bey mare heTinr. 
abed bone ipavin. Had her Sred with no remits (ao lame aha 
couldn't walk): decided to nee Sete-Tho-Horse. I did eo and 
■ incemymerehaa been sound. Now I care her all thla time loco 
wr. nracain. Soyoumayuae thla letter. I think S.ve-The-Hore. 
Is the crealeet remedy in the world. J. L. WALBSCHMIDT. J a. 
-rf«> carat a bottle, with a contract to abeolutely sod perme- 
*|»jf"^ nantlycore laae aae lie taaiia, Ibareeaaeie, Inline 
*P«- '•(eac.pt low). Cert. Seliel. Caeee< Keek. Wi.ee.n. 
S>ee l.il, la|.raa Teee'eee •■■ an laweeaaa er SEfSiS TIE aSMT. 
No acar or loaa of hair. Bsrae work, as naual. • 

IS el ell r o, ,.. i ■ er Sealer, er Cisreie real I. I.eas Caeefe. 
TUOICUiaiCaLCO., CaaeaaerelaJ A>e..atasaas>esa.l.a» 



TROY CHEMICAL CO., BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 

50 Bayo \ Kin Avenue. Oaklnnd, Cal. 251 Kear-y Street, Sua Francisco, Cal. 



WM. HAROLD 2:13 



J By Sidnay 2:19 , 
. Dam 
4 Cricket 2:10 



Sire of Frank N. 2:0734. Janice 2:0l% The Iceman 2:10, etc. 

Season 1912. $5 at first service; S20 when mare proves 
with foal. 

Apply or address 

JA8. D. JOHNSTONE, 

Elmhurst. Alameda Co., Cal. 



Saturday, January 20, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1911 Grand American Handicap 

THE GREATEST TRAP-SHOOTING HONOR OF THE YEAR WON WITH 



PETERS SHELLS 



y 
/ 
/ 
✓ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
✓ 
✓ 

$ By a Record Score, 99 out of 100 From 20 Yards 

^ Mr. Harvey Dixon of Oronogo, Mo., handicapped on the 20-yard line, and shooting PETERS Factory Loaded Shells, purchased hy him out of the regular stock of the 
Columbus Gun Club, won the most coveted honor in the trap-shooting world, together with the Inter-State Association Trophy and the $1,000 purse. The score of 
99 from 20 yards in the Grand American has never been equaled. It pays to use PETERS Shells — the kind having "Steel where Steel belongs." 



AT COLUMBUS, OHIO, wUNE 22, 1911 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 



New York) UH Chambers St., T. H. Keller, Mgr. 

San Francisco: 608-612 Howard St., J. S. French. Mgr. 

New Orleanst 321 Magazine St., E. F. Leckert, Mgr. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO. 



ANNOUNCE FOR 



MONDAY EVENING, FERROARY 12, 1912, 

A 

Complete Dispersal Sale 

OF 

40 HEAD OF HIGHLY - DRED TROTTERS and PACERS 

FROM THE FARM OF 

MR. GEO. E. STICKLE, Lockeford, Cal. 

Headed by a grand looking untried 4-year-old stallion by Bon Voyage 2:08, out 
of the dam of Helen Stiles 2:08^. 

Splendid brood mares by Stam B. 2:11^, Daedalion 2:08>£, Diablo 2:09)4, 
Silver Bow 2:16, Stickle and other standard sires, and out of mares by Direct 
2:05)4, Chas. Derby 2:20, Silver Bow 2:16, Dorsey's Nephew, Mount Vernon and 
other high-class stallions. 

All to be sold without reserve. 

These horses are all in good condition and some will weigh 1200 pounds and 
more. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 

Pedigrees Tabulated 

(Typewritten, Suitable for Framing.) 

Registration ot Standard-Bred Horses Attended to. 
Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and terms on first page; complete tabulated 
pedigree on the two inside pages and description on back page. 

Stallion Cards 

Two sides, size 3% x 6J^, to fit envelope. 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

Size, one-half sheet, 14 x 22; size, one-third sheet, 11 x 14. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1. 

Address, BREEDER AND SPORT8MAN, 

366 Pacific Bldg. , San Francisco 

ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 



Phone Kearny 2030. 



403 Battery St., San Franclsoo, Cal. 




TALLION OWNER 



If Ifi need of anything In the line of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts In stock and nrulo from photos, 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, l'retmators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



Ewes should be two years old be- 
fore being bred. 



SPECIAL ADVERTISING, 



Wanted, For Sale, and Miscellaneous advertis- 
ing under this head will be set in nonpareil 
type (same type below) and will be published at 
the rate of 2 cents per word each insertion, or 6 
cents per word by the month. Count each abbre- 
viation and initial as a word. 



FOR SALE. — The trotting stallion 
Altitude 2:22; seal brown; fine indiv- 
idual; sound and gentle. For terms, 
etc., address ( HAS. THOMPSON, R. F. 
R. I). No. 3, BakcrNfield, ( ill. 

STUD BOOK FOR SALE. — Volumes 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Bruce's American Stud 
Book; handsomely bound; good as new. 
Will be sold cheap. Address Breeder 
Hnd Sportsman, San Francisco, Cnl. 



FOR SALE. — Out of Rand's famous 
Mile High Kennels; Airedale puppies; 
Boston, French and English bulldogs; 
all of t^lie bfcst pedigreed stock in 
America. For further particulars, 
call on L. F. Rains, (J7(J Monadnock 
Itl.lK.. San Francisco. Plione Sntter 854. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE. — Bay mare 
by Chas. Derby, first dam Josie D. by 
Joe Daniel. About 10 years old; very 
handsome; a good driver; gentle; 
afraid of nothing; a good roadster. 
Address C. H. JONES, 713 5th Ave., San 
Rafael, Cal. 



FOR SALE, CHEAP— The best bred mare 
in California. Bay filly. 3 years old; sound. 
With 6 weeks' work paced a mile in 2:20 to a 
cart and had just 2:00 speed. Sired by Nutwood 
Wilkes; Ut dam by ISonnie Direct 2:05%; 2nd 
dam by Searchlight 2:(WM>: 3rd dam by Director: 
4th dam Lida W , dam of Nutwood Wilkes by 
Nutwood 000. Bred by Martin Carter, Nutwood 
Stock Farm. Address T. W. BARSTOW, 1042 
Alameda Ave.. San Jose, Cal. 



FOR SALE, CHEAP — One registered 
stallion, sired by McKinney 2:11%; 8 
yenrs old; sound. Also one imported 
draft registered stallion; weight 1800 
pounds; 7 years old. Would consider 
trade on heavy mare or standard-bred 
mares, or fillies. Breeding and pictures 
sent to interested parties. Address D. 
A. BAKER, Hill I'. O., San Diego, Cal. 

FOR SALE. — Standard bred black 
stallion; 15.3 hands; weighs 1100. Can 
trot in 2:15; nice mannered; easy to 
drive or control; good gaited; has 
trotted quarters in 31% seconds. Is 
only 5 years old. A grand stock, race 
or matinee horse; choicely bred; dead 
game, and handsome enough for a show 
ring. Address all communications to 
K. L>| Breeder and Sportsman Office. 

FOR SALE — Halley Wilkes, black 
mare by Count Wilkes 2:21; dam by 
Orator, grandson of Electioneer. An 
ideal road mare, trots good road gait; 
paces when at speed, free legged; uses 
no boots. With one month's training 
paced quarter mile In 34% seconds, 
half mile in 1:12 on half-mile track. 
Also three and four-year-old fillies out 
of the same mare by Dlctatus 2:17. For 
price and particulars address W. S. 
CLARK, Gustine Stock Farm, Gustlne, 
Cal. 



FOR SALE. A jet black stallion; was 
three years old December 20, 1911. A 
toppy, handsome pacer, nicely gaited. 
good size, and the making of a race 
horse. Has had so little training that 
It Is almost none and stepped a quarter 
in 34 seconds. Being as two of us own 
him, must be sold. He Is by Zolock 
2:06%; first dam. Angle Duryea (p.) 
2:17%. by Patchen Wilkes (the she of 
.Ine I'atchen and others); second dam, 
Angle I), (p.) 2:07 (the first mare to 
pace in 2:07). by Mikaban 2:1!). the sire 
of Frank Agan 2:03'4. If you desire 
such ;i horse, write to Dlt. \. C. Ill M- 
BLBAUGH, 805*6 South Spring Street, 
I, on \ ngeles, Cnl, 



Sunset Limited 



An entirely new luxuriously furnisbed, 
vacum cleaned, steel car train 

From San Francisco 6:00 p. m. Tuesdays 
and Fridays through Los Angeles and 
El Paso to New Orleans in 70 hours via 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Connecting at New Orleans with "New 
Orleans-New York Limited" for Atlanta, 
Baltimore, Washington, and New York; 
Illinois Central, Seaboard Air Line, 
Louisville & Nashville and other lines 
for St. Louis, Cincinnati, Chicago and 
Atlantic Coast Cities, as well as New Or- 
leans-New York SS Line for New York 
direct. 

Dinner service unequaled by the finest 
hotels or restaurants. Parlor observa- 
tion car with library, ladies' parlor, buf- 
fet, latest magazines and newspapers. 

Stenographer, barber, valet, shower 
bath, ladies' maid, manicure. Cour- 
teous and attentive employees. Excess 
fare $10.00. 

Write or call on our nearest agent for in- 
formation and reservations. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE 



The Standard-Iired Trotting Stallion 

UNIMAK 40936 

(Full brother to Sterling McKinney 
2:06%.) 

Sired by McKinney 2:11%, dam 
Twenty-third by Director 2:17; second 
clam Nettie Nutwood (dam of Hills- 
dale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18-%; third 
dam by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903; fourth 
dam by Williamson's Belmont. 

CJnlmak is a beautiful seal brown; 
stands 16.1 hands, and weighs 1250. He 
is one of the finest-looking, best-bred 
and best-gaited trotters on this Coast. 
His disposition is perfect. For terms 
and other information, apply to this 
(■l'lice. 



BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

J. 6. Phippen 

Is now located on the A. J. Clunle 
farm, adjacent to the celebrated Palo 
Alto Farm, at Mayfleld, where he Is 
prepared to keep a few horses through 
the winter. He has fine box stalls nnd 
paddocks and can take the best of 
care of all sent him. He Is also pre- 
pared to break colts either for city 
use or racetrack. His lifelong expe- 
rience In this branch of the business 
has fitted him to do this work care- 
fully and well. He takes pleasure In 
referring to all for whom he has ever 
worked. Address J. S. PHIPPEN, Mnj- 
(m i.i. Cal. 

PUBLIC TRAINING STABLE. 

DICK WILSON 
Of Plaaaanton 

Announces he will train a few good 
•prospects" for outside owners this 
winter and prepare them for next sea- 
son's campaign at very reasonable 
rates. Mr. Wilson has given 16 horses 
race records of 2:10 or better. 61 with 
records of 2:15 or better, besides giv- 
ing the double team Hedgewood Boy 
and Lady Maud C. the world's record 
to pole of 2:02%, besides winning many 
races with them. Address DICK WIL- 
SON, Race Track. Pleaaanton, Cnl. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 




8|o Buys The Best Horse Clip 
ping Machine in the World 

That's the price right at your dealer's for this wonderful Stewart Ball 

Bearing Enclosed <.ear Machine. 

Every horse should be clipped in season and ibis macbine will do it easier 
and quicker than any other. Has all file hard cut steel gears, enclosed, protected 
and running in oil. A marvelous machine. Clips horses mules and cows 
Get one from your dealer or write for otr complete catalog. Send a postal today 

CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY 
204 Ontario St., Chicago 




AN AMERICAN BREED. 

There are other breeds that lay 
claim to American origin, but Secretary 
Wm. McFadyen believes that the 
Poland-China is the only strictly 
American breed of swine. The breed 
originated in southwestern Ohio, 
where it was brought to a high de- 
gree of perfection by judicious min- 
gling of the blood lines, by the hog 
men of that section. Those old-timers 
back there in the forties to seven- 
ties did a world of good for them- 
selves and the country at large in de- 
veloping a breed of hogs peculiarly 
adapted to the needs of American 
breeders, packers and consumers. In- 
deed it was the activity of these peo- 
ple that helped more than anything 
else to give to Cincinnati the name of 



"Porkopolis," the proud title held 
by the Queen City till the young giant 
Chicago arose and wrested it from 
her. The Poland-China has been de- 
veloped to show quick maturity and 
easy feeding qualities. It has also been 
demonstrated that no breed will de- 
velop more size if bred in that line. It 
is the standard of all breeds for the 
so-called lard type. 

The breed has been developed in 
the corn belt, and it is the accepted 
type to go with this cereal. The dis- 
tribution of the breed in the United 
States is greater than any other, 
and the majority in the coun- 
try are more largely of Poland- 
China type and form than of any 
other. It is a breed that seems to suit 
the needs of the country very gener- 
ally, being in favor in the South and 



TWO GREAT SIRES. 

TheBondsman 

Reg. No. 37641 

SIRE OF 

Colorado E. (3) 2:04f, ^'.d £ 

the world. Winner of the Matron. American 
Horse Breeder and Kentucky Stock Farm Fu- 
turities; second in Kentucky Futurity. 

The Plunger (4) 2:07^,^,^ 

old stallion of 1910. 

Grace Bond (3) MH.3I5BSM 

Kentucky Futurity. 

Creighton 2:08i, rocord made in I9U - 

and 31 others. 

Half brother to Jay Hawker 2 :1 4 94 , sire of Country Jay 2:05%, Susie Jay 
etc. 

Half brother to The Tramp, sire of Bervaldo 2:08'4, Trampfast (2) 2:12»4. 
Half brother to Sorrento Todd (4) 2:14%. Belle Sentinel 2:15, etc. 




2:06Vi, 



IJARON WILKES 2:18.. 

Sire of 12 in 2:10, 
eluding Bumps 2: 
Rubensteln 2:05, Bar- 
on May 2:07'4'. sired 
dams of 4 in 2:10. 



!:18. . { 
), in- 

:03%, I 



OEORGE WILKES 2:22 

Sire of 83, dams of 204. 

BEUE PATCHEN 2i30% f 

In great brood mare list. | 



SORRENTO 

Dam of Jay Hawker 

2:14%, Sorrento Todd 
(4) 2:14>4, Belle Sen- 
tinel 2:15, Eola 2:19%, 
Lazy Bird 2:26%, Ted- 
dy Sentinel. 2:29%, The 
Tramp (sire), etc. 

4th dam Virgie — by Abdallah 15. 

5th dam Lucy — by Highlander (Veech's). 



GRAND SENTINEL 

2:21)% 

Sire of 23, including Nel- 
lette 2:16%, Tosca 
2:18%. 



EMPRESS 

Dam of 2 and grandam 
of 9. 



Pleasanton Training Park. $100 



the Season with usual 
return privilege 1818. 
Season ends June 1st. 



THE PATCH EN BOY 39033 

Three-Year-Old Record 2:10 In a Winning Race. 

Sired by the Great WILKES BOY 3803, sire of 107 in standard time. 
A Genuine Race Horse and a Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 
The Patchan Boy 39033 ia aire of the following: 



Francis J 2:08 

Evelyn Patchen. ..2:10 % 
Scott Patchen ...2:12% 
Dessie Patchen ..2:13 
Frank Patchen ..2:13% 
Ruby Patchen ...2:13% 
J. C. Patchen 2:14% 



Legal Patchen ...2:15% 
Lucile Patchen ..2:16 
Jerry Patchen ...2:16% 
Knightstown Belle2:16V4 
Alec Williams . . .2:18% 

Lois Patchen 2:19% 

Auduous the Miller2:19% 



Dorothy C 2:19% 

Louise Patchen ...2:19% 

Dr. Warren 2:19% 

Roscoe Binning ..2:20 

Mary Patchen 2:20% 

Black Patchen ..2:20% 
and 11 others in 2:30. 



HA.MRI-ETONIAN 10 

Sire of 40. 
DOLLY SPANKER 

Dam of 1. 
MAMBRINO PATCHEN 
58. 

Sire of 25, dams of 162. 
SALLY CHORISTER 
By Mamb. Chorister, 
dam of 2 in 2:20, etc. 
SENTINEL 280 

Sire of 8 in list. 
MAID OF LEXINGTON 

By Mamb. Pilot 29. 
ABDALLAH MAMBRINO 

Sire of 15, dams of 42. 
BIG ELLEN 

By Clark Chief. 



THE BONDSMAN is the only stallion that sired three new 2:10 performers 
with race records In 1910. In spite of the fact that he has no record, The Bonds- 
man was a colt trotter of great merit. He was a contending colt all through the 
Kentucky Futurity of 1899, getting third money. This was a six-heat race and was 
won by Boralma. As a four-year-old he was not raced, but trotted a public trial 
In 2:11. As a sire he is destined to be ths leading son of the great Baron Wilkes, 
founder of the greatest futurity winning" family. 

He will make the season of 1912 at 



Dam Lady Clay, the dam of The Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%, C. W. M. 2:24% 
(trotted to high wheels), Anglin Wilkes 2:16% over half-mile track, trial 2:09%, 
by Metropolitan 1372, son of Hambletonian 10; second dam, Haggie Brown, by 
Ashland Clay; third dam, Pitty Pat, thoroughbred. The Patchen Boy was the 
greatest three-year-old race colt In the world, winning six straight races in the 
Grand Circuit the only year he was raced. His produce are good-headed and real 
race horses. (No tin cups.) 

THE PATCHEN BOY is a beautiful black, 16.1 hands and weighs 1290 pounds. 
His colts are of fine size, great individuals and the kind that sell for the high 
dollar. 

Season of 1912 at Pleasanton Training Park. Fee: $50 SRSlami 

Both of the Above Horaea Will Remain in California. 

Best of care and attention given mares, but no responsibility assumed for 
accidents. Good pasturage at reasonable rates. For further particulars and full 
tabulated pedigree, address 

WILLIAM J. WILSON, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 
A Choice Collection of Kentucky Saddle Horaea for Sale. 



breed, and the market hogs of the 
on the Pacific Coast, where other feeds 
than corn are largely used. 



The Finest Winter Training Track in 
America. 

— THfcf— 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 

There are about 50 box stalls in first- 
class sliape, newly roofed, and ready for 
occupancy. Horsemen who intend to 
campaign their horses next season should 
not delay too long if they want to pre- 
pare them on this track, which is uni- 
versally acknowledged to be the safest 
and best in existence. These stalls will 
not be vacant long. For further par- 
ticulars apply to 

H. E. ARMSTRONG, 

Proprietor. 

HOMEPHONE PRAISED. 

A new subscriber writes the Home 
Telephone Company under date of Oc- 
tober 28, 1911: 

"Please install a phone at my home. 
I did not know anything about the good 
points of the Homephone and was 
rather prejudiced against It until I be- 
gan using it In my office. I use it all 
the time now. not only In phoning 
around the building, but getting outside 
numbers, because it saves me time and 
trouble. The Homephone delivers the 
goods. 

"You know the burners of candles 
rioted In London about 500 years ago 
when gas was Introduced. Most of us 
object to changes. Possibly that Is the 
reason why I am so late in ordering a 
Homephone." 

BAY CITIES 

HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 

331! Grant Ave.. San Francisco. 



SMITH'S WONDER WORKER 



Registered 



MakesThem 
Sound 

A Positive 
Cure for 
Blemishes 
of all kinds. 




Keeps Them 
Sound 

Soreness 
from any 
cause reliev- 
ed like magic 



Trade Mark 

Endorsed by Horsemen the world over as the 
BEST remedy for Bowed, Strained and Rup- 
tured Tendons. Weak Joints. Cording Up, Buck 
Shins. Shoulder. Hip and Stifle Lameness and 
Rheumatism. As a Leg and Body Wash it has 
no equal. $l> per bottle prepaid. $16 per dozen. 
$10 per gallon F. O. B. Tiffin. At all harness- 
makers and druggists. W. K. SMITH. Tiffin, 
Ohio. 

WM. E. DETELS, 

Pacific Coast Agent. Pleasanton. Cal. 



The Largest Place of Its Kind West of Chicago! 



G. Lindauer 

Proprietor. 

UNION LIVERY and SALE STABLES 

Work Horses to Let. 
Country Horses for Sale. 

Horses and mules bought and sold 

122-124 Clara St.. bet. Fourth and Fifth, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phone Kearny 659. Home J 2643. 

Special attention paid to the purchase and 
shipment of horses and mules to foreign and 
domestic ports. 

CHAS. WHITEHEAD'S 

Public Training Stable 

Pleasanton Race Track 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

Horses and colts trained at reason- 
able rates for next season's campaign. 
Best of care given. Developed and 
campaigned successfully the Futurity 
stake winners North Star 2:11%. Delia 
Derby 2:11% and many others. Address 

(HAS. WHITEHEAD, Pleasanton, Cal. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Mann siiore at 
Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing Tackle to let and 
Bait always on hand. First-class boats at reas 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat House, 

Capt. F. Wm. Ehrki. Prop.. Tiburon. Cal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market St.. 



MM 

HOTEL 

ENTIRELY REBUILT 
JINCE THE FIRE 

Far famed and first 
named wherever good 
hotels are mentioned. 

Recognized as the headquarter or 
the businessmen of the world. 
The place where you always find 
your friends. 

European plan only. 

Management 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

SM MCI5CQ 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalzlel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonaoie prloes 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

6X0 Ootavla St., between Fulton and Orove. 
Phone Market 2074. San Praneiaee, Cal. 

WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1158 Golden Gat* Avo 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster ana Cbestuu 

Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

traina 
for 
Buaineaa 
and places 
ita graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 

425 McAllister st. 

San Francisco. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealers In PAPER 

37-1 st St., San Franoiaoo, Cal. 

Blake. Moffit & Towne. Los Angelas. 
Blake. McFall <& Co.. Portland. Ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art In 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artiatio Designing 
121 Second St., San rranolaeo 



y\BSORBiNE 



Will reduce inflamed, strained, 
swollen Tendons, Ligaments, 
Muscles or Bruises, Core the 

Lameness and stop pain from a 
splint. Hide Bone or Bone Spavin. 
Nil blister, do hair gone. Horse can be 

used. 12 a bottle delivered. Describe 

Before After your case for special instructions and 
Book 8 E free. 
ABSORBINE, JR., the liniment for mankind. 
Reduces strained, torn llgamenu, enlarged glands, 
veins or muscles— heals ulcers--allays pain. Prioe 
tLOO a bottle at dealers or delivered. 
W.F.YOUNG, P.D.F., 54 Temple St., Springfield Mass. 

For tale by Langley 4 Michaels, San Francisco, Calif.: 
Woodward, Clark a Co., Portland, Ore.: F. W. Braun Co., 
Brunswig Dru« Co., Western Wholesale Drag Co., Lot An- 

8elM, Calif.; Kirk, Cleary & Co.. Sacramento, Calif.; Faclnc 
irng Co. Seattle, Wash.; Spokane Dru" Jo. .Spokane, Wash. 

Coffin, Redlngton Co.. San Francisco. Cal. 




Saturday, January 20, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



The Man Who has Come Back. 

The host of admirers of what the veteran war horse of the shooting game — The 
Hon. T. Bill Crosby — has done lately with his 34-inch barrel Parker gun, will be 
glad to read the following, viz: 

In the Eastern Handicap 100 out of 100 targets. 

In the Western Handicap 492 out of 500 targets. 

In Evansville, Ind., Tournament 395 out of 400 targets. 



Making a continuous run of 987 out of 1000 targets 

The only straight score ever recorded in the Grand American Handicap 

event was made with a Parker gun, scoring 100 out of 100 at 19 yards rise. Further- 
more the same Old Reliable has won the National Championship of America 

every year it has been shot for. 

For information regarding small bore guns, address the pioneer makers of the 
20 gauge 

PARKER BROS., 



Meriden, Conn. 



N. Y. Salesrooms. 32 Warren Street. 

Resident Agent: A. W. du Bray, P. O. Box 102, San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
»» OUTFITTERS 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPERS 
ATHLETE. 



1-8-53 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
*«? APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



Get Your Stallion's Picture 



IN THE 



Breeders Special 
Number 

OF THE 

Breeder and Sportsman 

WILL BE PUBLISHED 

Saturday, March 2, 1912 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this Coast. 

IF YOU OWN A G000 MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the 
best stallions on the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a work of 



reference. 



AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers, and those who are interested in Field Sports, it will be 
particularly valuable. 



OWNERS OF STALLIONS 



who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. Write for price 
and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco. 



| RESULT OF OVER A CENTURY'S EXPERIENCE. 




Perfection in powder-making is only achieved by exercising the most 
scrupulous care in the selection and preparation of raw materials, employing 
skilled workmen exclusively, and using only the most improved modern me- 
chanical equipment. 



This is the (5]J_PDhP method and accounts for the unequaled reputation 
among sportsmen enjoyed by the (Bj) PONT) brands of 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

Two of these brands that are in high favor among shooters are 




Bulk) 




I Bulk) 



A perfect shotgun powder with light recoil. Hard grain— Smokeless— uniform. Requires 
Unlike other powders of light recoil.Schult/c no special wadding to make it do its best, 

gives high velocity and remarkable pat- Loader! just as easily as Black I'owder. A 

terns. " The Ola Time Favorite." IB 

These powders positively will not pit the gun barrels. J 

Unequaled for Field and Trap-Shooting. f 

See that your shells are loaded with either SCHULTZE or E. C. Send to-day for Schultze A 

and E. C. pamphlet No. 99. It contains information of interest to all shooters. jj 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY g 

Established 1802. Pioneer I'owder Makers of America. Wilmington, Dal. f 

GOLCHER BROS. 



Camping 
Goods. 




Fishing 
Tackle. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 

510 Market St., San Francisco 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Of San Francisco 



CAPITAL 
$3,000,000.00. 
SURPLUS AND PROFITS 
$1,500,000.00. 



Rudolph Spreckels. Pres. 
James K. Lynch. Vice- Pres. 
J. K. Moffltt, Cashier. 




Offers adequate banking 
service to mercantile firms, 
business men, professional 
men and banks. 



Post and Montgomery 



J. H. Skinner. Assistant-Cashier 
C. H. McCormick. 
(feo. A. Kennedy. 



Quimis Ointment 



Will Make A Hot-mo Over; 

will put so, rid legs under him and 

will save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It Is the 
standaid cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints, Windpuffg and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you wdl be. prepared when trouble comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use It. 

Mr IT. n. t'lnrk. Frodnnln. N. T., wrlto«: "The bottle of 
Qulnn'* Olnlmanl puri-hawd rmm JOU nh.wt two ye»r«»Ko 

it-moved a curb and n.... :hi ... and did It fur Rood. My 

DONS'I ltg Isbs utuootU an ever." 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Bold by all druggists or sent by mail' 

Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY A COMPANY, WHITEHALL, M. Y. 



(6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1912. 




REPEATING 
SHOTGUN 

because it is the only bottom-ejecting pump gun. 
— because it is built to shoot hard and close. 
— because it handles fast and balances perfectly. 

At trap or blind, its short leverage enables the shooter to double without kinking or crimping. 

peming tonrUMc —the perfect shooting combination. 



REMINGTON-ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY, 



299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



•.VWSXXJOeWOSXXXSSXXV^ \\\N\\\\\\\\\\v\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\N\\\\\\V\\\\\\\\WO«W \\\\\\V\\\\\\\S\\\\\\\\ x 

WINCHESTER 

Rifle, Revolver and Pistol Cartridges. 

When you buy cartridges, always insist upon getting Winchester make — 
the Red W Brand. Then you will have as good cartridges as it is possible 
to produce. No matter how good your rifle, revolver or pistol may be in 
itself, unless you use good cartridges in it, you will not get good results. 
Winchester cartridges are made for all makes of rifles, revolvers and pistols, 
and, while they do not cost any more than many inferior brands, they are 
superior to all others in strength, accuracy and uniformity. Being manu- 
facturers of both arms and ammunition, we are able to approach the subject of ammunition 
making from both sides, the result being the manufacture of practical ammunition that 
gives the best results in all firearms. Remember to ask for the Red W Brand. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., - NEW HAVEN, CONN. 





LOADS 

THE 



1911 WINNERS! 



Unequaled for VELOCITY, PATTERN and PENETRATION, SELBY LOADS have 
enabled AMATEURS TO WIN CONSISTENTLY at every 
shoot on the Pacific Coast in I91I. 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 



LOADS ARE 

Loaded on the Pacific Coast. 

ALWAYS FRESH, ALWAYS RELIABLE, BACKED BY THE SELBY GUARANTEE. 

San Francisco. Special Loads at a Moment's Notice. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



f HIGH TEST 

OIL 

HIGHEST GRADE 

PENNSYLVANIA OIL 

MANUFACTURED EXPRESSLY FOR 



IWHITTIERCOBURNCOJ 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Argo Coal Oil 

SAFEST FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Absolutely Sweet, Water White, Glean, Highest Test Oil 

NO SMOKE-ODORLESS. 

MANUFACTURED EXPRESSLY FOR 

Whittier - Goburn Company 



Penn. 150° Test. 49° Grav. 



301 Howard St., 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Write for 
Nearest Dealer. 



443 So. Los Angeles St., 
LOS ANGELES. 



MT. DIABLO CEMENT 

bast for foundations, dai ry floors, fruit dryer floors, etc. etc. 

SANTA CRUZ LIME 

bast for bricklaying and plaatering. 

MT. DIABLO LIME 

bast for spraying and whitewashing. 
WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICES ON ALL BUILDING MATERIAL. 

HENRY COWELL LIME & CEMENT COMPANY 

9 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



THE 



Slate Fair Futurity Stakes No. 4 

Foals of Maraa Covered in 1911 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$ 5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



$2,850 for Trotting Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



$2,150 for Pacing Foals. 



California State Agricultural Society, Sacramento. Cal. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE FEBRUARY 1, '12. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS : 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

For Two-Year-Olds to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1914. 

Two-Year-Old Trotters . .... $600 
Two-Year-old Pacers 400 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started in above and won no money. 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

For Three-Year-Olds to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1915. 

Three-Year-Old Trotters $1400 

Three-Year-Old Pacers 1100 

CONSOLATION, for horses that started In above and won no money. 



Two-Year-Old Trotters 
Two-Year-Old Pacers 



ENTRANCE FREE — Otherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

$350 I Three-Year-Old Trotters 
250 Three-Year-Old Pacers 



$400 
300 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1. 1912, when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1912; 
$5 December 1, 1912; $10 on yearlings February 1, 1913; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1914; $10 on three-years-olds February 1, 1915. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace, $25 to start in the two-year-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pace; $50 to start in the 
three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair at which the race is to take place. 

No additional entrnnce will be charged In the Consolation Stakes. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered Is a Trotter or Pacer. 
Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starting again In the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITIONS. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats 2 in 3, and for three-year-olds, 3 in 5. Distance for two-year-olds, 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or If either the mnre or foal dies before February 1, 1013, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 
paid In or contracted for. In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mnre must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1911. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. . . rn ™ . u ' ' 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $o000, the amount of the 
guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacng divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the third heat. 
Races for Three-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the fifth heat. 

Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat in three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown by the 
summary. 

Entries open to the world. 

Write for Entry Blanks to 

A. L. SCOTT, President. c> ALLISON TELFER, Mnuager, Sncramento, Cal. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank, rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 
Breeder and Sportsman 



Advertise in the Breeder and Sportsman 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sporting Authority of tho Pacific Coaat. 

(Eitabllihed 1883.) 
Published every Saturday. 
T. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 



OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts.. San Francisco. 

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per year additional. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not neoessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



THE PAST ten days have been history-making ones 
in the trotting horse industry of the Pacific Coast, 
and a general awakening in all that pertains to it 
is noticeable everywhere. On Thursday night, Janu- 
ary 18th, one of the largest and most enthusiastic 
assemblages of leading trotting horse breeders, own- 
ers and officials of racing associations ever gathered, 
was in session at the Palace Hotel, pursuant to a 
call for such a convention, issued by Mr. Shirley 
Christy, secretary of the Arizona Territorial Fair 
Association. 

Those who attended were delighted to observe an 
unanimous desire to hold a Pacific Coast Circuit 
worthy of the name, and, as stated in our last issue, 
the people in the north who are engaged in the trot- 
ting horse industry in British Columbia, Washington 
and Oregon came fully prepared to advocate the 
cause of their splendid racing and fair associations. 
Their sentiments regarding the absolute necessity 
for a continuous racing circuit met with a hearty re- 
sponse from the leading horsemen of California, 
who joined with them in expressing the wish that 
there would hereafter be no "lay over" weeks from 
the time the bell called the horses to the post in Vic- 
toria, B. C, until the last race was decided at Phoenix, 
Arizona. A committee was appointed to confer with 
the officials of the North Pacific Circuit, who will 
meet at Walla Walla, next Thursday, February 1st. 
After adjournment Mr. Christy will return to this 
city and file his report. This committee will find 
that it has much to contend with, but three better 
qualified men than Messrs. Christy, Alley and Rol- 
ston could not be found. They are wide-awake, 
active and enthusiastic, but their enthusiasm does 
not. overbalance their judgment, and, as they have 
given this subject much study, it is believed they 
will be able to present it in the most comprehen- 
sive manner possible, and strive to get those present 
to consider it as carefully as their hearers did last 
Thursday afternoon and evening. 

The magnitude of this project can hardly be real- 
ized by horsemen, and the generous spirit which 
prompted so many to come forward with funds to 
help it along proved that they want to see it succeed. 
The formation of such a circuit will be of inestima- 
ble value to every farmer, horse breeder and live- 
stock owner in California, for, if these fairs and 
meetings are carried on successfully, there will be 
little or no trouble to procure State aid for their 
maintenance hereafter. There may be about eight 
fairs, besides the State Fairs at Sacramento and Los 
Angeles, to apply for appropriations and these appli- 
cations will not be denied. All talk of getting more 
than this number should be stilled. These fairs will 
lead up to the great fair in 1915 and, with the pre- 
miums to be given there for exhibits of livestock, 
there is another incentive for our people to buy bet- 
ter stock, breed more intelligently and strive harder 
to have all their stock in "show condition" at every 
one of these places as well as at the big one to be 
held in San Francisco in our Exposition year. 

There is another object in having this continuous 
circuit of fairs wherein race horses, draft horses and 
livestock may be carried directly from one fair to the 
other, and that is the regulation of steamship and 
railroad rates. A committtee duly authorized by 
this Pacific Coast Fair and Racing Association will 
confer with the proper officials of the transporta- 
tion companies regarding rates and fares, and ar- 
rangements will be made to have a material reduction 
in these, so that instead of compelling all stable em- 
ployees to pay first class passenger rates from point 
to point these men (from the nature of their calling 
must ride in baggage and livestock cars), should 
only pay reduced rates. 



The question of extensively advertising a circuit 
of these dimensions is another important as well as 
very essential one to be decided. If, when the cir- 
cuit dates are finally settled, steps are taken to 
properly set forth the total amounts to be raced for 
on this coast, the classes to be decided and the con- 
ditions under which these events are to be held, there 
is no doubt there will be many in Canada, Idaho, Mon- 
tana and Wyoming who will fall in line and bring their 
horses all the way through the circuit. Not only this, but 
there may be many Eastern horsemen and trainers 
who will be attracted here by the size of the purses 
and our genial climate, wherein no rain falls for 
nearly eight months of the year to render their 
horses unfitted for the task of lowering records and 
winning a share of the stakes and purses offered, 
and they will bring consignments of colts and fillies 
with them which will represent the most fashionable 
trotting futurity families. Many of these will 
be purchased by enthusiastic horsemen on this Coast 
in order that they may improve the trotting families 
they have been so long interested in. 



every stallion owner should strive to get the best 
mares possible for his horse, so that there will be 
some good two-year-olds ready to compete for the 
rich Futurity Stakes to be decided in 1915 at the big 
meeting. 



IN THE issue of the "Breeder and Sportsman," 
September 30th of last year, the attention of its read- 
ers was called to the holding of a race meeting, horse 
show, livestock exhibition, a trap-shooting contest 
and a rifle and pistol tournament at the Stadium, in 
Golden Gate Park, during the Panama-Pacific Exhi- 
bition in 1915. The great advantages these various 
exhibits would have as "magnets" to draw crowds 
of people were fully set forth, and, like good seed that 
fell upon fertile soil it germinated immediately, for 
in a few weeks thereafter we were delighted to note 
that the Park Amateur Driving Club directors saw the 
feasibility of holding a big race meeting at that time, 
and every week since some work has quietly been 
accomplished with that end in view. In subsequent 
issues we spoke of the absolute necessity of length- 
ening the track and widening the homestretch, offer- 
ing big purses and giving the greatest light harness 
horse meeting ever held in the United States. East- 
ern turf journals have copied these articles and com- 
mented most favorably upon them, and when on Mon- 
day night, the committee of five appointed by the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association 
and the Park Amateur Club to confer with the Pan- 
ama Pacific Commissioners was increased to eleven 
by the addition of seven of the most active and best 
qualified horsemen and racetrack managers on this 
coast, there was considerable pride felt in our in- 
ception of such an idea. 

The gentlemen who are to act as a board of directors 
are very enthusiastic as to its ultimate success, and 
a glance at their names shows that when it comes 
to accomplishing great things they stand in a class 
by themselves. It is incumbent, therefore, upon all 
horsebreeders, owners and trainers to uphold them 
in their efforts to make this the greatest and most 
successful feature of the exposition: Captain Wm. 
Matson, former president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and at present the president of the Matson 
Steamship Company; Ivey L. Borden, capitalist and 
director of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association; S. Chistenson, director of the Park 
Amateur Club; A. L. Scott, hardware merchant and 
president State Agricultural Societl; Colonel J. C. 
Kirkpatrick president of the Palace and Fairmont 
Hotels Company and vice-president of the P. C. T. H. 
B. Association; T. J. Crowley, owner of oil wells, 
president of State Agricultural Society; Colonel J. C. 
and also one of the directors of the P. C. T. H. B. A.; 
John A. McKerron, horse boot manufacturer, pres- 
ident of the Park Amateur Driving Club and director 
in the P. C. T. H. B. A.; Fred W. Kelley, owner of 
the "Breeder and Sportsman," and secretary of the 
P. C. T. H. B. A; Senator Ben F. Rush, large land 
owner and former president of the State Agricultural 
Society and at present one of its ablest directors; 
Charles W. Paine, capitalist and director of the State 
Agricultural Society and P. C. T. H. B. A.; Fred 
W. Thompson, secretary of the Park Amateur Driv- 
ing Club; Chas. Durfee, former owner and trainer of 
McKinney 2:lli4, and director of the P. C. T. H. 
B. A.; Thomas Bannan, capitalist and director of the 
Park Amateur Club; Dr. Ira B. Dalziel, veterinary 
dentist and director of the Park Amateur Driving 
Club. Every one of these is a well-posted horseman 
and all have the time to devote to this cause which 
they have most cheerfully and willingly espoused. 

Full particulars of this meeting appears in another 
column of this Issue and will furnish cheerful read- 
ing for every owner of a well-bred trotting and pacing 
colt filly on this Coast, and now is the time when 



AT THE large and enthusiastic meeting of horse- 
men who gathered to organize the Pacific Coast Fair 
and R?cing Association, some one declared that the 
P. C. T. H. B. Association should not claim any 
dates for the fair, because they had neither town 
nor place where racing could be held. For the in- 
formation of that one and all others who have the 
same erroneous idea, it may be stated that the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association was or- 
ganized to hold meetings at no particular place on 
the Pacific Coast. It was formed for the purpose 
of giving races wherever it was deemed proper and 
wherever the people who were most deeply interested 
made it an object for this association to hold meet- 
ings. Consequently, meetings have been given dur- 
ing the twenty-two years of its existence in Chico, 
Fresno, San Jose, Salinas, Petaluma, Santa Rosa, 
Oakland, and Los Angeles, and when the industry 
was almost "all in, down and out," when there were 
very few race meetings held by other associations, it 
gave two, and sometimes three meetings a year dur- 
ing that "dark period." It has disbursed more money 
to the horsemen than any other organization de- 
voted to the trotting horse industry in the world. 
Over $500,000 have been distributed to the horsemen 
on the Pacific Coast and its fame as a sterling or- 
ganization extends wherever trotting is known. Its 
history is recognized throughout the East as well 
as here and its credit is unquestioned. As President 
Borden of the Pacific Coast Fair Association in his 
reply to the insinuating person truly said, "It is the 
backbone of the trotting horse industry on this 
coast." 

THE LAST CALL! When this issue is printed it 
will contain the last call to broodmare owners about 
the date of closing of entries for the State Fair Fu- 
turity Stake No. 4, value $5000, which is next Thurs- 
day, February 1st. It takes but $2 to nominate a 
mare in it at that time; the produce to trot or pace 
when two and three years old. The owner of 
the stallions which sired the winners of these three- 
year-old trotting and three-year-old pacing races are 
each entitled to $100, and they should strive to induce 
broodmare owners to make entries in this stake. 
The conditions are most liberal and every broodmare 
owner should read them and act accordingly. It is 
not only a matter of pride to have a foal's name 
appear in the list of those which are entered, but if 
enhances its value as a selling proposition. If one 
reads the returns from the big Eastern sales it will 
be noticed that those colts and fillies which are heav- 
ily engaged in futurity stakes bring the very highest 
prices. And the same rule applies to those foaled 
here. So do not forget to heed this last call for 
entries for this rich stake. 

DEATH OF JOHN FLOURNOY. 



Last Saturday afternoon this estimable gentle- 
man, who was well known to thousands of people 
in all walks in life in this city, passed away after 
a long illness, Brlght's disease being assigned as the 
immediate cause of death. Although he had been 
failing for several years, he visited his law offices 
daily until a fortnight ago, when he suffered a ner- 
vous collapse. 

Mr. Flournoy conducted some of the most impor- 
tant cases to come before the California courts, and 
was for more than twenty years the legal represen- 
tative in the West of the late D. O. Mills. He was 
born at Danville, Contra Costa county, in 1856, and 
was a graduate of the University of the Pacific. He 
was part owner of the Riding and Driving Club 
building at Seventh avenue and C street, the finest 
establishment of its kind west of New York City. 
Deceased was one of the most enthusiastic of horse- 
men, and was very quiet and gentlemanly, and one 
of the kindest and most generous of men. He is 
survived by his wife, his mother, two sisters and a 
brother. 



Two weeks of zero weather and icy streets have 
imposed great hardship on horses in eastern cities. 
The checking list of the Illinois Humane Society 
shows that in Chicago an average of a thousand 
horses have fallen on the streets daily, and 4 per 
cent, or forty horses daily, have died of the Injuries 
thus sustained. Sharp shoes get dull so quickly that 
it Is impossible to keep teams up to their maximum 
pulling power. With loads reduced 25 per cent and 
more, and every horse and wagon pressed Into serv- 
ice, many firms, particularly the coal companies, 
have fallen far behind with their traffic. -Breeders' 
Gazette. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



WHAT WILL IMPROVE RACING CONDITIONS? 



[By W. P. McNair] 

What can be done to improve the racing conditions 
is a subject receiving much attention at the present 
time. The articles by George Starr and W. I. Hig- 
gins have been read with much concern by everyone 
interested in the subject and there is much in both 
articles calculated to make for improvement from 
the standpoint of the owner, the driver, the associa- 
tion manager and the patrons of our race tracks. 

In Mr. Starr's articles I notice some things which 
do not appeal to me as tending to that elevation of 
harness racing we have hoped for so long, and the 
thought occurs that whilst his discussion is yet in 
its infancy, we might do well to look some things 
squarely in the face and apply such remedies as may 
seem best. 

First of all, Mr. Starr says "try open booking 
instead of associations selling the privilege which 
permits a combination book." With an anti-betting 
law in so many States, why not do away with the 
books entirely? In the early days book-making 
was unknown and at each meeting many thousands 
of dollars changed hands on every race through the 
medium of the auction pools. Take our running 
races of that day for an example. The races were 
for a distance and almost every meeting of any con- 
sequence had one four-mile dash and frequently a 
race of four miles and repeat. Those were the days 
when the United States seemed to divide itself, and 
as in the Longfellow-Harry Bassett race at Long 
Branch, N. J., seem to array the North and East 
against the South and West in the matter of sup- 
porting a choice in the auction pools. The advent 
of the bookmaker brought a reduction of distance 
for the runners, in order that "the sure thing boys" 
might get a "quicker action" for their money and 
the inordinate defire to "get something for noth- 
ing" brought to us the "tout," and with him began 
the series of thefts which eventually led to legisla- 
tion of the most drastic sort against all classes of 
horse racing, and indirectly has had its effect upon 
the harness industry. The enactment of anti-racing 
laws was brought about and is entirely chargeable 
to the horsemen themselves because of the encour- 
agement given to the bookmaker. 

Eliminate the book-maker entirely. Make it impos- 
sible for him to do business upon any association 
track where harness racing in particular is being 
conducted, and the one great evil will be eradicated 
and an excuse for being dishonest on the part of 
some driver "needing the money" will be removed. 
If betting must be indulged in, and it seems almost 
essential, use the Pari-mutuel system with a total- 
izer attachment and we will have the betting pub- 
lic making their own odds instead of some rascally 
book-maker who must depend upon his ability to 
"fix" a driver in the race. 

The inauguration of dash races as proposed by 
Mr. Starr, it apears to me, will have a tendency 
to change very materially our system of breeding. 
Instead of breeding a colt to "go the route" we will 
be breeding a class of horses fitted to be classed 
with the running "quarter-horse." Instead of horses 
fitted for "all purposes," we will have an apology for 
one, the form and hair but with no stamina "to go 
for a doctor" should he live more than a mile frcm 
our home. 

It may be that our system of racing colts is wrong 
and some change should be made in that respect 
either by reducing the distance or the number of 
heats required for a race, but why make a system 
of dash races simply to care for a class of horses 
which should have been kept at home in the first 
place. It is an unfortunate circumstance that an 
owner or driver may start from home with a good 
prospect entered in a full line of stakes or purses, 
win a heat or race and because of a sickness or 
lameness have to withdraw from racing during the 
current season, possibly for all time; but is it a 
fair proposition that the horses which are in shape 
to race through the circuit should be punished be- 
cause of the other's unfortunate condition? All own- 
ers and trainers take such a chance when they make 
early closing entries and expect to send the horse 
home if he is not in condition to race further. It 
might be a good thing for some horses and owners 
if associations could afford to care for all their 
friends and give special or even dash races to cover 
the need of the unfortunates, but where would an 
association come out at the financial end? Would 
a special race made for unconditioned or crippled 
horses cover the point and enable all horses to win 
money? I do not believe it would, and a number of 
such races would soon pall upon the good nature of 
the track patrons who had paid their money to see 
actual contests of speed. 

The idea of classing horses according to their win- 
nings might have a tendency to give the earning ca- 
pacity of some horses a much greater limit than 
now exists, classed as they are by the record, and 
the suggestion, should, in my judgment, receive the 
most careful consideration at the hands of our 
governing bodies. At the same time, the suggestion 
offered by Mr. Higgins seems to me to be the one 
most adaptable to our present system of racing. Re- 
classify the horses at the end of each three weeks 
of the campaign and thus take away the one that out- 
classes his fields, giving the horses at the end of 
each re-classifying period a better chance to win 
and by so doing carrying a full field all "down the 
line.' The most discouraging thing facing an owner 
or driver is the fact that some horses able to dis- 
tance his field will contend, sometimes as a good 



work-out, from the opening of the circuit until its 
close for the big stakes or purses. This too, when 
the entrance fees of the slower horses are paid up 
and go to help pay the earnings of the phenomenal 

one. 

The division of the monies as suggested by Mr. 
Higgins will give each horse something more than 
the amount paid out for entrance and in many in- 
stances such a sum, be it ever so small, is very 
acceptable. 

Whatever is done must be along lines that will 
increase the earning capacity of the fast horse. 
What inducement is there for a man to give his 
horse a fast record when he knows that the faster 
he goes the smaller future purses and stakes will 
be for him to contend for? Make every class faster 
than the 2:10 for the greater amount. Seek to se- 
cure the entries of the fast ones Mr. Secretary and 
you will have something for your publicity agent 
to talk about before your meeting, and your patrons 
will do the talking after the meeting has closed. It 
is the fast horses the general public wish to see 
perform. It is the fast horse the driver likes to win 
with, and when the money in sight is sufficient to 
induce a real contest, each heat will be a "race from 
wire to wire" and the pleasure of all parties en- 
hanced. 

Mr. Higgins offers another suggestion which seems 
of paramount importance and that is the requiring 
of a guarantee that associations are not depending 
upon the entrance fees and gate receipts for pay- 
ment of the purses or stakes. The expense of ship- 
ping from place to place is not the least for the 
campaigner to provide and when he has made a ship- 
ment covering hundreds of miles in order to get into 
territory, which early in the year had offered good 
purses, only to find that one or more of the towns in 
the circuit had declared off the "big money" stakes 
or purses and he might be given an opportunity to 
compete in a "special," how can he help feeling 
that he has "gotten the worst of it" and go away 
pledging himself to not only keep away from that 
town himself, but to keep others from getting the 
same treatment another year. Nearly every asso- 
ciation of any standing can give such a guarantee 
without working a hardship and with it in sight, 
the horseman will feel a greater degree of security 
and will "take a chance." 

There is another matter which might be considered 
at this time with propriety, and that is the practice 
by some of taking and making conditional entries. 
There is a rule forbidding such, and yet, there is 
hardly a meeting given that does not carry almost 
a direct evidence of some concession having been 
granted to a favored horseman that was not ac- 
corded to all. What is given to one is the right 
of every other man who makes an entry, and when 
horsemen and association managers realize that the 
rule will be applied in every case disclosed, there 
will be less of this sort of work. During the past 
year several parties felt the weight of the rule and 
it is safe to say that the future will find them 
among the "good boys" simply getting what they 
are entitled to. Adhere to the published rules of the 
parent association and if there are any bad rules 
the necessity for their abrogation will become mani- 
iest the quicker and the good rules will be the better 
appreciated. 

So much has been said from time to time about 
the judge's stand that one might naturally think that 
subject had become exhausted, and yet, year after 
year, we find meeting after meeting with the "promi- 
nent citizen" acting as a judge of racing, even after 
he has admitted to his friends that he "knew little 
or nothing about the rules." While I am agreeable 
to give the "prominent" one every consideration, I 
do not think it right to jeopardize the chances of 
man or animal to earn money, because of ignorance 
of established racing rules. My idea is there should 
be a rule requiring a licensed presiding judge in 
every association stand with the licensed starter. 
That the presiding judge should make all decisions 
and covering the racing, and then the prominent citi- 
zen could occupy a seat where all in the grandstand 
can see him, but he, doing no harm. Make it obliga- 
tory upon the starting and presiding judges to know 
that the timer's stand is occupied by men who are 
competent, and by a frequent checking of their work 
during a meeting, know that the time which is being 
hung out is absolutely correct. This would, in my 
opinion, have an effect to get capable men in the 
timer's stand at each meeting and remove to a great 
extent the pernicious practice of suppressing time. 
When a driver is sure he is going to get "all that is 
coming to him," he is ready to do his best, but, let 
him become suspicious of either the judges or the 
timers, and he will manifest a disposition to "protect 
himself" in some way or another. 

Now just a word regarding the starting judge. 
There is no official on a race track that comes in for 
so much unjust criticism as that officer, nor does 
any one carry so much weight of responsibility — 
hence, it is of the utmost importance that a starter 
be a man of experience, of firm executive ability, and 
gifted with a marked degree of patience. Did some 
one lose a dollar, it was the starter robbed him out 
of it. Did some horse that had been chosen by the 
"rube" come in first, and because of a foul drive or 
other cause get set back, it was the starter who is 
to blame, although he had absolutely nothing to do 
with the decision, and in some way or another that 
official is given to understand the opinion of the 
"rube" and his friends. Some one writing in a re- 
cent number suggested that the horses be given the 
word on the fourth score, regardless of the positions 
or gaits. The writer has not had occasion to give 



the horses a "sponge" in so long that the appearance 
of a water bucket in the hands of an attendant would 
seem to be a curiosity, and yet, I would submit, a 
grievous injustice might be done man and horse by 
establishing such a rule. Why not make such a rule 
applicable after the second score or even after the 
first score? It would be as just as after the fourth. 
Every horse entered in a race is entitled to considera- 
tion, and it is the duty of a starter to exercise 
patience with the bad actor, but not to the extent 
of jeopardizing the chances of the other horses in 
the race. There is an old adage, "the race track is 
a poor place to break a horse," and it is true, and, 
while some horses that may come to a starter may 
carry the appearance of being badly broken, it is not 
always that class of horse that creates the trouble. 
Sometimes the driver seems to act as if unable to hold 
his horse, sometimes they seem to have too much 
strength, and there is a remedy for such. It is not 
always the same horse that spoils the score, with a 
large field, there may be various causes for the scor- 
ing. But to get to the bad actor. At almost every 
meeting we see a horse in the hands of an experi- 
enced driver that has taken a fit of sulks and will 
not attempt to come down for the word. The use 
of a little judgment on the part of the starter may 
get that horse away, and the result of the heat be 
an ample reward. Assume for an argument that a 
bad actor has drawn or earned the pole. He has 
the worst position possible for a horse to have, ex- 
cept he may be given the protection the position 
demands. If the rule suggested should be inaugu- 
rated and the word be given on the fourth score 
regardless of position or gait, the pole horse would 
be "out of it" before the word could be given. The 
horse that has the pole has earned a position de- 
manding protection from the starter, and when the 
word is given with the pole horse not fully up in 
his position and on his stride, the chances are he 
will not be the pole horse going around the first turn, 
and if the field should be a full one, he will probably 
have to out-trot it in order to get any kind of posi- 
tion for the next heat. Protect the pole horse, give 
every driver to understand, by your work, that he 
and his horse will receive the same consideration at 
your hands that every other horse in the race re- 
ceives and there will be no occasion for such a rule. 

The writer had a personal acquaintance with "Earl- 
ville" Smith, the recognized dean of all starters, and 
upon one occasion was told by Mr. Smith, "Son, re- 
member when you are starting horses to see that the 
pole horse receives your protection and he will pro- 
tect your field." I have always found this advice to 
be sound, and it is cne of the fundamental rules of 
my practice to know that the pole horse is in his 
place and on his stride. When it was my privilege 
to sit in a sulky, I always had a suspicion of a new 
starter, and when once my horse had earned the pole 
and the word had been given with me trying to bring 
down the field, with my horse doubled up and not 
up with the leaders, I always tried to protect myself, 
and usually did it to the discomfiture of the starter. 

Upon the occasion of my first visit to the California 
circuit I worked for the Breeders' Association at Los 
Angeles. The very first race on the programme 
showed a fast class with a large field of two tiers. 
One of the drivers, Tom Snider, had an entry and 
drew the pole. He came down twice without his 
field, seemingly under the impression that the first 
money was his by right and he had no interest in 
the other contestants. I cautioned him and his reply 
was, "That's all right, judge, I'll protect myself." He 
did so the next score and I imposed a fine at once. 
He appeared to be surprised, but seemed to gather 
himself, and iooking up at the stand said, "Thank 
you, sir. What, may I expect for himself?" I assured 
him of my protection and expected him to bring the 
field down to me. He did so, got away, much to the 
pleasure of the crowd, and a great heat was the 
result. From that time on, I have never started a 
race in California or the Pacific circuit that every 
driver has not given me his assistance, because he 
knows I will protect him. Whatever is done, inspire the 
horsemen with confidence in the judge's and timer's 
stands, and they will do everything in their power 
to make the meeting a success by good racing and 
the elimination of the tedious scoring our friend 
seeks to obviate. 

In reply to Mr. Starr. It has been my observation 
extending over a period of years that the horses 
which were being raced during the elder Doble's time., 
and even in the time of Budd Doble, the two Maces, 
"Jock" Turner, "Red John" Murphy, and others in 
the early months of the year around New York and 
vicinity, when Prospect Park, Fleetwood, Saugus, 
Beacon Park, Albany, Utica. Rochester, and Buffalo 
constituted practically the Grand Circuit, were not 
to be compared with the horses of our day and gen- 
eration from a racing standpoint. While there was 
some great racing then, the manner of training and 
equipment was not so conducive of extreme speed, 
and we would oftener see a free-for-all won in slower 
time than 2:20, than we would in faster or even in 
2:20. In those days an average speed of a given 
meeting would not exceed 2:30, and the horses were 
"up to the starter" practically all the year round. 
In those days a meeting would be given calling for 
as much as $300 for the free-for-all class, and the 
programme would include everything from the 3:30 
class down to the free-for-all. I have attended meet- 
ings in early June in New York, New Jersey, and 
Pennsylvania at which a strong horse would start 
every other day and once in a while find a good horse 
in charge of a "bonehead" that would be raced every 
day and in as many classes as the owner or driver 
thought there was "a chance" to win. I don't believe 
that any number of dash races would have excited 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



the people of that time, nor do I think they can be 
made popular just now. 

To sum up, 1 would suggest as follows: Keep har- 
ness racing as clean as possible; give the fast horse 
a chance to make an earning in keeping with his 
speed; eliminate the bookmaker; condemn every 
chance for granting or receiving "special" privileges; 
give the meetings just as advertised, and, above all, 
keep your judge's stand as well as the timer's stand 
above reproach, and we will have gone a long way 
toward solving the "what is the matter" of the pres- 
ent day. 

THE ARIZONA FUTURITY. 

The following is a list of those who made the 
second payment in the Arizona Futurity Purse No. 1 
for foals of 1911: 

Geo. T. Becker's foal, by Zombro-Lady Secretary; 
foal by Zombro-Cymara ; foal by Zombro-Lady 
Van Nuys; foal by Tbe Bondsman-Lady Van Zom, 
and foal by High Pride-Helen Dare. 

W. V. Bennett's br. c. by Bon Voyage-Clara Collins. 

I L. Borden's b. c. by Barney Barnato-La Belle Alta- 
mont; br. c. by Barney Barnato-Hester McKinney; 
b. f. by Barney Barnato-Kate Lomax; rn. f. by Char- 
ley D.-Directola. 

W. M. Breckenridge's foal by Col. Greene-Nana Lea. 

T. W. Brodnax's br. c. by Kenneth C.-Mary Chimes. 

C. H. Butts' b. c. by Lou Kinney-Herminia. 

C. A. Canfield's foal by Carlokin-Mamie Elizabeth; 
foal by Walter Barker-Redina; foal by Carlokin- 
Eilleen: foal by Don Reginaldo-Lillian Welborn,. 
and foal by El Volante-Chloe. 

H. W. Chamber's foal by Monnett-Nellie . 

J. T. Clark's foal by Dr. Clark-Daisy Lee, and Little 
Johnnie by Palo King-Mattle J. 

W. W. Cook's foal by Mark-Surprise. 

A. H. Davidson's foal by Milo McKinney-Dellnette. 

Henrv Delanev's br. f. by Joe Locke-Ella Mac. 

Wm. E. Detel's foal by Bon Guy-Melba.T. 

F. E. Emlay's blk. f. by Washington McKinney Jr.- 
Bird W. 

Geo. H. Estabrook's Estarado by Colorado E. -Dorothy 
Axworthy. 

Ted Haves' blk. c. by Bon Voyage-Cecille M.; b. f. by 
Carlokin-Belle Pointer, and ch. c. by Bon Mc- 
Kinney-Helen Keyes. 

Hemet Stock Farm's ch. c. by Geo. W. McKinney- 
Louise Carter; br. f. by Geo. W. McKinney-Mamie 
Redmond; b. f. by Geo. W. McKinney-Hemet Light; 
b. c. by Geo. W. McKinney-Louise R. ; br. c. by Geo. 
W. McKinney-Muriel C. ; b. c. by Geo. W. Mc- 
Kinney-Stambia; ch. c. by Geo. W. McKinney-Lady 
Zombro; b. c. by Worth While-Nealy W. 

J. M. Hughes' blk. f. by Lou Kinney-Bird. 

F A. Haradon's foal by Carlokin-Carrucca. 

C. A. Iekel's blk. c. by Lou Kinney-Maydello. 

Geo. W. Kanoff's b. c. by Lou Kinney-Juego de Azer. 

H. M. Kennedy's foal by Dr. Clark-Gypsey. 

H. C. Lockett's foal by Nyreal-Nettie Oh So. 

John S. Ludt's blk. f.- by Lou Kinney-Peggy Arnett; 
b. c. by Lou Kinney-Bostonia, and b. f. by Lou 
Kinney-Hallie Oh So. 

F. C. Mosser's foal by Lou Kinney-Mollie M. 

E. E. Main's ch. f. by Peter Wood-Lady Belle Onward. 

F. H. Metz's Bon Fire by Bon Voyage-Queen Abdallah. 
Lafe Myer's b. f. by Arizona McKinney-Goldie Marc; 

br. f. by Col. Green-Dolly M., and b. f. by Lou 

Kinney-Dixie. 
Wm. McBride's foal by Alconda Jay-La Moscovita. 
M. B. McGowan's foal by Zolock-Queen Derby. 
J. L. Ober's foal by Shirley-Lady. 

Ed. L. Peckham's b f. by Symboleer-Little Lovejoy; 
br. c. by Symboleer-Princess Ruth; b. f. by Sym- 
boleer-Mazette; b. c. by Symboleer-Jessie Nut- 
wood; b. f. by Symboleer-McHenry mare; b. f. by 
Symboleer-Linen, and br. f. by Oklahoma Allerton- 
Babe Cups. 

W. J. Porter's b. f. by Bon McKinney-Golden Bliss. 
R. G. Shawver's blk c. by Leland D.-Oh So Mare. 
A. L. Scott's Bonnie Rose by Le Voyage-Rosie Wood- 
burn. 

Jas. Stewart's b. c. by Copa de Oro-Easter D., and 

b. c. by Zombro-Silkwood Mare. 
W. N. Tiffany's foal by Carlokin-Lady Vasto. 
C. H. Thompson's b. f. by Baffin-Daisy Sprite. 
Valencia Stock Farm's blk. f. by Zombro Heir-Isabella, 

and br. c. by Zombro Heir-La Belle H. 
Frank Wood's b f. by Boydello-Binona. 

WORK HORSE PARADE. 



At the regular monthly meeting of the board of 
trustees of the San Francisco Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals, held in the assembly 
room of the Mills building last Monday afternoon, at 
which Messrs. John Partridge, A. H. Lissak, E. P. 
Heald, I. B. Dalziel, John McGaw, A. Van der Naillen 
Jr., Theodore Kytka, W. K. Gutzkow and John M. 
Ratto were present, a committee was appointed to 
confer with the directors of the Work Horse Parade 
Association with a view of organizing a parade to be 
held on July 4th, next. 

There has been no parade since the one held Sep- 
tember 9, 1909, which was the first one in the West. 
Over two thousand horses participated and it was 
the largest parade of horses en record up to that 
time, but larger ones have since been held in Chicago 
and London. At that time the parade was intended 
as an annual feature, but its postponement was 
deemed advisable last year, and it is now proposed 
to repeat it, if the directors of the Work Horse 
Parade Association desire to do so. 

Other business consisted of routine matters and 
Secretary Matthew McCurrie read a report of the 
society's work for the month, showing 609 cases 
investigated, involving 1,029 horses and mules, 539 
dogs, and 151 cats. Officers examined 1,008 horses, 
relieving 225, and ordering from wcrk 147. Thirteen 
offenders were prosecuted and 225 warned. Twenty- 
seven horses were moved in ambulances, and four 
horses, 490 dogs, and 138 cats were humanely killed. 

JERAID'S l.tST CALK. FOR JANUARY. 



The Jerald Sulky Co., of Waterloo. Iowa, offer their 
latest improved sulky any size and color for $64.16 
cash with order, or $57.00, $10.00 to accompany order, 
balance when sulky is delivered, which may be any 
time before May 1st. 

They do this to get your order before the rush, and' 
also to get an idea of the sizes and colors that will be 
the most in demand the coming season. SEND IN 
YOUR ORDER AT ONCE, and assist them In building 
a first class sulky at a moderate price. Their prices 
will be $3.00 higher for the month of February. 



SIRES OF FIVE 2:10 PERFORMERS. 

There are sixty-three stallions that have each sired 
five or more 2:10 performers, and fifty-six of these 
sixty-three sires have records. Moko, Mambrino King 
and Sidney Dillon were trained enough so they 
showed fast miles. The Director General was one of 
the fastest colts of his time. Pilot Medium was a 
cripple and could not be trained, but his sire and 
his dam each had a record. Whether the remaining 
two — Bourbon Wilkes and Greystone — were trained 
is not known. 

In looking over the blood lines of these sixty-three 
stallions, one will be impressed with the fact that- 
leaving out those bred in pacing lines — they are uni- 
versally bred in trotting lines, the younger ones being 
more noticeable in this respect than the older ones, 
and with a larger number of performers— age con- 
sidered—and a higher speed rate to their credit. 

To those who note closely the efforts of develop- 
ment as an adjunct to breeding, the following table 
of these sixty-three sires will afford an interesting 
study. Those marked with a (*) are California sires: 

Trot. Pac. 

Alcander 2:20%. by Alcantara 2:23, dam Cleo- 

patra, by Abdallah Prince 749 •■:'"',"• 

Alcantara 2:23, by George Wilkes 2:22, dam 

Alma Mater, by Mambrino Patched 58 « 

Allerton 2:09%. by Jay Bird 2:31%, dam Gus- 

sie Wilkes, bv Mambrino Boy 2:26V 2 6 3 

•Altamont 2:26%. by Almont 33, dam Sue Ford, 

by Brown Chief 4445 2 5 

Anderson Wilkes 2:22%. by Onward 2:25%, dam 

Magnet, by Strathmore 408 2 6 

Argot Wilkes, pacer, 2:14%, by Tennessee 

Wilkes, pacer, 2:27, dam Sally Ward, by Ben- 
nett Chapman 9 

*Arion 2:07%, by Electioneer 125, dam Man- 

ette, bv Nutwood 2:18% 6 

Ash-land Wilkes 2:17%, by Red Wilkes 174:), 

dam Daisy B., by Administrator 2:29% 1 11 

Atlantic King, pacer, 2:09%, by Atlantic 2:21, 

dam Carrie Blackwood, by Blue Bull 75 .... 6 
Axtell 2:12, by William L. 4244, dam Lou, by 

Mambrino Boy 2:26% 5 2 

Axworthy 2:15V 2 , by Axtell 2:12, dam Marguer- 
ite, by Kentucky Prince 2470 6 

Baron Dillon 2:12, by Baron Wilkes 2:18, dam 

Mattie Nutwood, bv Nutwood 2:18% 1 4 

Baron Wilkes 2:18, by George Wlikes 2:22, dam 

Belle Patchen 2:30%, by Mambrino Patchen 

58 5 7 

Bellini 2:13%, bv Artillery 2:21%, dam Merry 

Clay, by Harry Clay 2:29 9 

Bingen 2:06%, by May King 2:21%, dam Young 

Miss, by Young Jim 2009 7 3 

Bobbv Burns, pacer, 2:19%. by General Wilkes 

2:21%, dam Dixie, by Director 113 2 6 

Boreal 2:15%, bv Bow Bells 2:19%, dam Rosy 

Morn, bv Alcantara 2:23 3 3 

Bourbon Wilkes 2345, by George Wilkes 2:22, 

dam Favorite, bv Abdallah 15 5 

Brown Hal, pacer, 2:12%, by Tom Hal 16934, 

dam Lizzie, by John Netherland 1 12 

Cecilian Prince 2:30, bv C. F. Clay 2:18, dam 

Sara C, by Metropolitan 1372 8 

•Charles Derby 2:20. by Steinway 2:25%, dam 

Katie G., by Electioneer 125 1 8 

"Chimes 2:30%, by Electioneer 125, dam Beauti- 
ful Bells 2:29%, bv The Moor 870 5 6 

Constantine 2.12%, by Wilkes Boy 2:24%, dam 

Kincora, by Mambrino Patchen 58 1 7 

Dan Patch, pacer, 1:55%, by Joe Patchen, 

pacer, 2:01%, dam Zelica, by Wilkesberry 

2:30 11 

Delmarch 2:11%, by Hambrino 2:21%, dam Ella 

G., by George Wilkes 2:22 1 4 

•Demonio, pacer, 2:11%, by Charles Derby 2:20, 

dam Bertha, by Alcantara 2:23 5 

♦Diablo, pacer, 2:09%, by Charles Derby, 2:20, 

dam Bertha, by Alcantara 2:23 S 

•Direct, pacer, 2:05%, by Director 2:17, dam 

Echora 2:23y 2 , by Echo 462 4 11 

Direct Hal, pacer, 2:04%, by Direct, pacer, 

2:05%, dam Bessie Hal, by Tom Hal Jr 16934. 5 
•Director 2:17, by Dictator 113, dam Dolly, by 

Mambrino Chief 11 : 2 4 

•Directum 2:05%, by Director 2:17, dam Stem- 
winder 2:31, bv Venture 2:27% 5 2 

Gambetta Wilkes 2:19%, by George Wilkes 

2:22, dam Jewel, by Vermont 104 3 16 

Gambrel, p.. 2:10%, by Gambetta Wilkes 2:19%, 

dam Belltield, by Enfield 2:29 7 

Grattan 2:13, by Wilkes Boy 2:24%, dam An- 
nie Almont, by Almont Jr. 2:29 3 8 

Great Heart, p., 2:12%, by Mambrino Russell 

2:08, dam Willie Wilkes 2:28, bv George 

Wilkes 2:22 ; 4 3 

Greystone 6164, by Nutwood 2:18%, dam Starl- 
ing, by George Wilkes 2:22 6 

Hal B., p.. 2:04%, by Hal Dillard, p., 2:04%, 

dam Ellen M., bv Blue Boy 7 

Hal Dillard. p., 2:04%, by Brown Hal, p., 2:12%, 

d(tm Annie Pointer, by John Dillard Jr 9 

Heir-at-Law, p., 2:05%, by Mambrino King 1279, 

dam Estabella, by Alcantara 2:23 5 

High wood 2:21 y z , by Nutwood 2:18%, dam Del- 

pliine, by Harold 413 4 1 

Jay Bird 2:31%, by George Wilkes 2:22, dam 

I>ady Frank, by Mambrino Star 585 7 1 

•McKinney 2:11%, by Alcyone 2:27, dam Rosa 

Sprague, by Governor Sprague 2:20% 13 10 

Mambrino King 1 279. by ManibiTnn Patchen 5S, 

dam Belle Thornton, by Edwin Forrest 49 . . 8 5 
M"ko 24457, by Baron Wilkes 2:18, dam Queen 

Ethel, by Strathmore 408 3 2 

Moquette 2:10, by Wilton 2:19%, dam Betsey 

and t, by Ericsson 130 5 

•Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, 

dam Lida W., p., 2:18%, by Nutwood 2:18%.. 2 5 
Online, p., 2:04. by Shadeland Onward 2:18%, 

data Angelina, by Chester Chief 2172 7 

Onward 2:25%, by George Wilkes 2:22, dam 

Dolly, bv Mambrino Chief 11 5 6 

Oratorio 2:13, by Wilkes Boy 2:24%, dam Can- 
zonet, by Dictator 113 8 

Peter The Great 2:07%, by Pilot Medium 1597, 

dam Santos, by Grand Sentinel 2:27% ..12 1 

Pilot Medium 1597, by Happy Medium 2:23%.. 

dam Tackey 2:26, by Pilot Jr. 12 4 1 

Prodigal 2:16, bv Pancoast 2:21%, dam Bea- 
trice, by Cuyler 100 3 4 

Shadeland Onward 2:18%, by Onward 2:25%, 

dam Nettle, bv Mambrino Time 1680 1 4 

•Sidney, p., 2:19%. by Santa Claus 2:17%, dam 

Sweetness 2:21%, by Volunteer 55 2 7 

•Sidney Dillon 23159, by Sidney, p., 2:19%, dam 

Venus, breeding unknown 5 4 

Silent Brook 2:16%. by Dark Night 2528, dam 

Jenny Clay, by Harry Clay 2:29 3 2 

Star Pointer, p., 1:59%, by Brown Hal, p., 2:12%, 



darn Sweepstakes, by Snow Heels 

•Steinway 2:25%, by Strathmore 408, dam Ab- 
bess, by Albion n 

The Director General 31,738, by Director 2 17. 
dam Winifred, by William L. 4244 •> 

Todd 2:14%, by Bingen 2:06%. dam Fanella 2:l':i' 
by Arion 2:07% a 

Wilton 2:19%, by George Wilkes 2:22. dam Al- 
ley, by Hambletonian 10 4 

•Zolock. p., 2:05%, by McKinney 2:11%, dam 
Gazelle 2:11%, by Gossiper 2:14% 1 

•Zombro 2:11, by McKinnt-y 2:11%. dam Whis- 
per, by Almont Lightning 1023 7 

THE BREEDING OF YOUNG BASSINGER. 



A Missouri subscriber asks for the correct breed- 
ing of the dam of Young Bassinger, sire of Belle 
of Wabash. This horse is registered in volume II, 
page 88, Of Bruce's American Stud Book. ' His dam 
is there given as Mischief, by American Eclipse; 
second dam by Sir Harry Hotspur (son of Sir 
Archy); third dam by Davis' Hambletonian (a son 
of Tayloe's Hamlintonian by imported Diomed); 
fourth dam by Peacemaker, etc. There is no horse 
registered in Bruce's American Stud Book by the 
name of Sir Harry Hotspur, or Harry Hotspur. 

Among the writings of Dr. W. H. Marrett (better 
known as Vision), I find a published tabulated pedi- 
gree of Belle of Wabash. Mr. Marrett gives the dam 
of Bassinger (the horse registered as Young Bassin- 
ger, and sire of Belle of Wabash) as Mischief, by 
American Eclipse; second dam a daughter of Hot- 
spur; third dam by a grandson of imported Diomed, 
and fourth dam by Peacemaker. Dr. Marrett was 
one of the best posted horsemen on pedigrees that 
the writer ever met. He was a graduate of Bowdoin 
College, studied medicine, received a diploma with 
the degree of M. D., but his love for good horses and 
his interest in the trotting breeding problem created 
in him so strong a desire to visit the extensive breed- 
ing establishments in all sections of the country, that 
he engaged in the sale of books, chiefly standard 
medical works, and traveled with his own team 
through the New England, Middle, Western and 
Southern States, including Kentucky and Texas. 
While in Kansas he obtained permission to exhume 
the skeleton of Ethan Allen 2:25%, which he did for 
the purpose of determining whether or not the son 
of Vt. Black Hawk 5 had a bone spavin as some had 
claimed. He found a slight protuberance just below 
one hock joint, but it was not of the nature of ex- 
ostosis. 

We are unable to state from what source Dr. Mar- 
rett obtained his information concerning the breed- 
ing of the dam of Bassinger (Young Bassinger), but 
know well that he considered it trustworthy, for he 
had no theories to support, and his investigations 
were made for the sole purpose of learning the truth. 
He learned that the dam of the noted brood mare 
Nell was by Embry Horse, a sen of Embry's Lexing- 
ton, instead of by Embry's Lexington, as- was gen- 
erally supposed. As there is no Sir Harry Hotspur 
registered in Bruce's American Stud Book, and know- 
ing from an intimate acquaintance with him that 
Dr. Marrett was a thoroughly competent and careful 
investigator of pedigrees, and further, that his facts 
were obtained after volume I of the Stud Book was 
published, the writer is inclined to believe that Dr. 
Marrett's version of the pedigree is correct. Hotspur 
is registered in volume I of Bruce's Stud Book. His 
sire was Timoleon by Sir Archy and his dam was a 
daughter of Sir Archy. — Horse Breeder. 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK NOT SOLD. 

The Pleasanton race track is still the property of 
H. E. Armstrong, and as far as is known by anybody 
concerned will continue to remain as such. A rumor 
gained credence this week that the present owner 
had transferred his holdings to the Spring Valley 
Water Company and spread like wildfire throughout 
the district. It is authoritively stated that not an 
iota of truth is in the matter and Mr. Armstrong was 
not even approached by the company or any of its 
representatives concerning a sale. 

There have been persistent rumors, however, with- 
in the past few months, that several parties, all 
horsemen, have been contemplating the purchase of 
this valuable piece of training ground, and, like any 
other good business man, probably Mr. Armstrong 
would sell if given his price. The present condition 
of the property is much better than for many former 
years, many thousands of dollars having been spent 
within the last two seasons by the owner, in im- 
provements. 

These rumors, Mr. Armstrong says, have never 
materialized, and at this writing he does not know of 
anyone who is seriously considering even making 
him an offer. — Pleasanton Times. 

All the different lines of horse breeding are flour- 
ishing as is indicated by the auction in Paris, 
Franco, recently of a Clydesdale stallion for the rec- 
ord price of $47,500, the largest price ever received 
for a draft horse. This Is the more striking from 
the fact that the horse was twelve years old and the 
best previous price ever received for a Clydesvllle 
stallion was for a two-year-old at $15,000, a record 
that has stood for twenty years. Trotters are sell- 
ing in Europe and Australasia for more money than 
ever before, besides the Europeans are also expend- 
ing hundreds of thousands of dollars in the United 
States for high class horses, showing that the In- 
dustry was never in a more prosperous condition. 
This showing is the more remarkable in France from 
the fact that the automobile has an exceedingly 
strong hold in that country, but notwithstanding 
that the gasoline wagons are in great demand be- 
cause of tbe s.plondid condition in which the roads 
are kept, still the fact remains that horses are 
bringing more money than ever before 



1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



f NOTES AND NEWS | 

Kinney Lou 2:07% has arrived safely in Russia, 
his future home. 



There are some splendid bargains offered in our 
For Sale columns. 



Walnut Hall Farm is going to still further reduce 
its broodmare contingent. 



Dick McMahan is wintering twenty-three horses at 
the Liberty ville (111.) mile track. 



Daughters of Baron Wilkes produced twenty of the 
new standard performers of 1911. 



Doesn't the trotting horse industry begin to look 
real gocd to every one this year! 



Axtell, by William L., son of George Wilkes, is the 
sire of 124 trotting and twenty-two pacing standard 
performers. 



Send in your items. We know there is a revival 
in the trotting horse industry in your vicinity, so let 
us hear the very latest news. 



It will be a great loss to the California horse in- 
dustry if Lijero 2:15% is sold to some Eastern or 
foreign horseman. Horses of his class are extremely 
rare. 



Coralene 2:23%, by Del Coronado 2:09%, dam 
Ethaline (p.) 2:19%, by Coeur de Leon, is a new 
performer. 



H. K. Devereaux was re-elected unanimously as 
president of the Grand Circuit at the annual meeting 
held January 9th, in New York. 



W. E. D. Stokes, of New York, has given a valuable 
trotting stallion to the breeding plant of Booker T. 
Washington's Tuskegee Institute. Other millionaire 
horsemen will give mares. 



El Angelo 57039 is the name given to the handsome 
trotting stallion belonging to D. W. Wallis, of Los 
Banos, that was sired by The Angelus 2:10%, out of 
Maud J. C. (dam of Nearest McKinney 2:13%), by 
Nearest 2:22%, etc. 



It looks very favorable for that big meeting in 
1915 at the Stadium. A good live committee is 
working on it and if there is a body of men who 
can accomplish anything in that line this is just the 
one to do it. 



C. A. Purcell, one of the owners of The Meadows 
tracks at Seattle, has a bunch of mighty good looking 
youngsters by Carlokin 2:07% and Del Coronado 
2:09%, out of high-class mares. — Pacific Horse and 
Sportsman's Review. 



It is reported that King Brook 2:07% will not be 
raced in 1912. Business arrangements may keep Mr. 
Higgins from getting to the races, in which event he 
will spend his leisure time improving King Brook's 
gait. 



Budd Doble writes from Hemet as follows: "The 
Ilemet Stock Farm recently purchased Louise A. 2:17 
by Boodle 2:12%, dam Azrose by Azmoor 2:20%, for 
the purpose of breeding her to the champion Wilbur 
Lou." 



Absolute dispersal of the entire breeding inter- 
ests of the late Uhlein Farm will take place at the 
Wisconsin State Fair Grounds, Milwaukee, Wis., at 
public auction. This includes ten yearlings by The 
Harvester 2:01. 



Walter W. 2:04%, by Little Frank (p.) 2:09, 
dropped dead at Memphis, Tenn., on the evening of 
January 15th. He was owned by W. R. Neill and 
Walter McLain, of Memphis, and was for three sea- 
sons past a good winner for Mr. Geers. 



Attention is called to the advertisement of the 
grandly bred Percheron stallion Electeur Jr. He is 
one of the largest, most compactly made, gentlest 
and surest foal getters in California. He should pay 
for himself this season in any farming country. 



Some of the leading trotting horse journals are 
getting badly tangled up on the hopple question. 
It would be a good idea if they dismounted and let 
this "question" out a hole — yes, several holes- — just 
for the benefit of the long-suffering public. 



The famous Point Breeze race track, Philadelphia, 
which was constructed in 1855, was sold last week 
and is to be cut up into building lots. It was over 
this course that Dexter, Goldsmith Maid, Lady Thorn, 
Harry Wilkes, and many other celebrities raced. 



Mr. T. J. Crowley, treasurer of the Pacific Coast 
Fair and Racing Association gave $100 to the fund 
to carry the work on. There are scores of others 
to be heard from, and when everything is finally 
settled it will be found that the trotting horse 
breeders and owners will all be represented on the 
books by substantial sums. 



Mr. I. L. Borden's beautiful undefeated black mare 
Cleopatra 2:11, is running out in a paddock in Ala- 
meda and has gained over 100 pounds in weight 
since her return from the meeting in Southern Cali- 
fornia. She will be a 2:05 pacer this year, if no 
accident happens her. 

Vallejo Girl 2:10% Mrs. F. H. Burke's fine trotting 
mare, is the first one to be booked to Bon McKinney 
(3) 2:24%, at San Jose. Mr. T. D. Witherley has 
booked his good mare Jetta Richmond (dam of 
Diablito 2:08 and Valentine, two-year-old trial of 
2:20) to this grandly bred son of Bon Voyage 2:08. 



Mr. McPherson, of Vancouver, B. C, is expecting 
his twelve trotters and pacers any day at the Pleas- 
anton track. He engaged his stalls for them last 
week. It looks as though there will be at least 200 
horses working at the "Historic Track" before 
spring. 



Dr. Hartnagle, Seattle, has taken up Henry 2:13%. 
He was fired last year, is now sound, and looks like 
he will get to the races again this year. Hartnagle 
is also jogging a good looking three-year-old by 
Diablo 2:07%, dam Red Girl, dam of Panama Maid 
2:20. 



There are thirteen weeks of good racing on the 
grand circuit this year and twelve weeks on the Pa- 
cific Coast Fair and Racing Circuit, if the latter 
commences at Vancouver, B. C, as outlined. There 
may be a few "feeders" to it from Marysville, Chico, 
Roseburg and the Prairie Provinces Circuit. 



Remember there will be some grandly-bred racing 
material in the shape of promising colts and fillies 
sold at the Chase sale in this city, February 12th. 
Some of our best and purest-gaited game trotters 
will be well represented, viz: Bon Voyage 2:08, and 
Silver Bow 2:16. 



Mr. Shirley Christy, of Phoenix, Arizona, left this 
city for Walla Walla last Monday, where he is to 
confer with the delegates of the North Pacific Cir- 
cuit relative to the new Pacific Coast Fair and 
Racing Association which was formed last week. 
Mr. Christy expects to return about February 5th. 



B. O. Shank, of North Randall, O., will race over 
the Grand Circuit tracks this season for H. C. Cham- 
bers, of Long Island, N. Y., Evelyn M. 2:01%, pacer, 
by The Spy; J. D. Mac. 2:13%, pacer, by J. H. L. 
2:0S%, and the trotter Four Stockings, by Kinney 
Lou 2:07%. This last named once belonged to the 
late F. J. Kilpatrick. 



An Eastern horseman who has seen Lijero 2:15%, 
says: "If he was in the Middle West or East he 
would be sold within a week." He has grand size, 
style, and breeding. He can beat 2:20 barefooted, 
without wearing a boot and with only one bit in his 
mouth. Take him for all in all he is one stallion 
out of ten thousand. 

A subscriber would like to know how Jennie S. 
2:20, a pacer by Directum 2:05% that got her record 
at Colusa, August 14, 1902, is bred. Her pedigree on 
the dam's side is given as "untraced," but we be- 
lieve a mare of her caliber must have some breeding 
on the maternal side. 



The idea of extending the stadium in Golden Gate 
Park to one mile meets with the approval of all 
horsemen. The centerfield will then be long enough 
to make all kinds of straightaway tracks for the 
athletes who will compete in the Olympic games to 
be held there in 1915. 



R. O. Newman, of Visalia, could not resist the 
temptation to visit Studebakers' and buy one of 
those nobby driving carts all complete for $60; the 
usual price being $125. The prices of all others ad- 
vertised in our Holiday number are fifty per cent 
less than they were originally. 



There never were two more enthusiastic meetings 
of trotting horsemen held in California than those at 
the Palace Hotel Thursday, January 18th and Mon- 
day, January 22d; and great progress was made at 
both meetings for the betterment of the interests in 
which they, as well as all horse owners, breeders 
and trainers on the Pacific Coast, are concerned. 



The seven-year-old bay trotting mare Marigold 
2:12% has been sold by John W. Hoyle, of Illinois, 
to Thomas Murphy, of New York, for a long price, 
announced as $10,000. Marigold holds the world's 
record for mares for five consecutive heats over a 
half-mile track, and has done a trial mile better than 
2:10, so great things are expected of her in the hands 
of the famous trainer. 



"The best looking lot of trotting stock I ever saw," 
was the comment of a prominent horseman who vis- 
ited George Stickles' place with a view of selecting 
some good colts and filles. As these are all listed 
in the catalogue this gentleman will have to take his 
chance of getting them at the auction sale to be 
held at Fred Chase's Pavilion, February 12th. There 
are youngsters here by Stam B. 2:11%, Bon Voyage 
2:08, Silver Bow 2:16, Daedalion 2:08%, and Stickle 
out of some of the handsomest mares ever seen in 
a pasture. In next week's issue we w ill publish a 
more extended notice of those to be sold. It prom- 
ises to be one of the best sales ever held at this 
place. 



There are many owners of broodmares who would 
like to own, race and breed them to a first-class 
stallion. Jas. W. Marshall, of Dixon, has just the 
horse they are seeking. His advertisement appears 
in this issue. He is also offering some very choicely 
bred mares and fillies. These will be sold at a 
sacrifice for the reasons he states, and it will pay 
anyone to go and look them over, and get his prices. 



Mr. G. Cuneo, of Oakland, owner of Gracie Pointer 
2:07i4, in company with Thomas J. Kelly, of Louis 
Taussig & Co., and the popular "Jimmy" McVeigh, a 
well-known business man of Oakland, visited the 
Pleasanton track last Monday. Mr. Cuneo spent a 
portion of the time with his valuable pacer and also 
looked at her mother, in the DeRyder pasture. She 
is in foal to Aerolite. 



The Sacramento Driving Club has elected officers 
for the year as follows: Thomas Coulter, president; 
George Vice, vice-president; M. J. Murray, secre- 
tary; Sam Smith, treasurer. The secretary's annual 
report showed receipts for the year of $1,608.42. At 
a meeting to be held early in March the programme 
for the season of 1912 will be mapped out. It is 
planned to increase the membership to 200. 



Mr. E. D. Diggs, of Stockton, has taken his grandly 
bred stallion McAdrian, by Guy McKinney, to Pleas- 
anton, and intends to make a season with him there, 
and then put him in training. McAdrian is the sire 
of Bert Kelly that trialed in 2:11 last season at 
Pleasanton, and will be a candidate for Grand Circuit 
honors this season. McAdrian also sired Grace Mc- 
Adrian 2:13%, and Grace Chalmers (trial) 2:18. 



J. L. Tarlton has sold to G. E. Tulpin, of Pawnee, 
111., the black yearling filly by Prince McKinney, dam 
Serpolita (3) 2:25% by Mendocino, grandam Sally 
Benton 2:17% (dam of Serpol 2:10 and three others), 
by General Benton, the third dam is Sontag Mohawk, 
dam of nine with records of 2:30 or better. This filly 
is individually in keeping with her rich pedigree, and 
as she is entered in all the futurities is likely to be 
heard from later on. 



Since the schedule of places and dates claimed 
by the Pacific Coast Fair and Racing Association 
has been announced many owners of promising trot- 
ters and pacers have been solicited by trainers to 
have them put in training immediately. There are 
owners of other good ones which will find ready 
sale if their merits are properly set forth. It looks 
as if a "boom" has at last been started in the trot- 
ting horse industry on this coast and everybody en- 
gaged in it will share in the profits. 



The State Fair Futurity Stake No. 4, valued at 
$5000 is one of the best events in which trotters and 
pacers can be entered, for, besides the honor of hav- 
ing a colt or filly named in it, there is this additional 
advantage, it enhances the value as a selling propo- 
sition. Entries for this stake will close next Thurs- 
day, February 1st, with C. Allison Telfer, manager 
of the State Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal., 
and this is the last notification. For conditions see 
advertisement. 



How about that stallion advertisement? Owners 
should get busy. Another vital requisite, and one which 
every broodmare owner wants, is a card containing 
a full description and tabulated pedigree of the stal- 
lion he breeds his mare to. The "Breeder and Sports- 
man" has unsurpassed facilities for doing this work 
promptly, neatly, and absolutely correct, giving due 
credit to every one of the progenitors of every stal- 
lion and mare up to 1912. This has been made a 
specialty with this journal this season. 

Stallion owners should endeavor to get all the 
good mares they can for their horses, for the 
produce in 1913 will have some of the grandest op- 
portunities for making money as two-year-olds ever 
offered colts and fillies of that age. The only way to 
get these mares is to place an advertisement of the 
stallion in the Breeder and Sportsman at once. The 
cost of one service fee will pay this, and in no other 
class of advertising can a man get greater financial 
as well as wider publicity, and publicity brings busi- 
ness. 



In the article about Andy McDowell which ap- 
peared in our issue of January 13th it was stated 
that Charles Jones drove the pacemaker when Alix 
trotted in 2:03% and Directly as a two-year-old 
paced in 2:07%. This was an error. It was Charles 
James, now at Pleasanton, who drove the pace- 
maker in these events. Charley stands in the very 
front rank when it comes to this kind of work. His 
first lessons in it were taken on the San Mateo 
Stock Farm when the late John A. Goldsmith was 
"teaming" the colts and fillies there. 



H. Henry, of Stockton, has three horses at 
Pleasanton. consisting of the eight-year-old pacer Will 
Guthrie, that has already paced a mile in 2:10%; he 
goes free-legged and looks, acts, and paces like the 
"real thing." Mr. Henry also has a two-year-old filly 
sired by Alconda Jay, out of La Moscovita; she is 
just a beginner but is nicely gaited and acts like the 
"making" of a good one. Beretta D., is the name 
of a very nice filly he has, she is by Charley D. 
2:06%, out of Beretta 2:22% (sister to C. The 
Limit 2:04y 4 ) by Searchlight 2:03%, out of Bertha, 
"the greatest of all brood mares." This last named 
represents the "acme of breeding." 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



Nine horses from the Sacramento Valley Stock 
Farm, the property of Dr. G. S. Farnum, of San 
Francisco, arrived at the Pleasanton race track last 
Monday. They consist of the grand-looking, beauti- 
fully-bred Sidney Dillon stallion, Dillcara; Flosnut 
by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, and seven of the progeny 
of Disscara, one three-year-old stallion and six year- 
lings. These are in charge of trained Ed. Rail. ■ 



The Prairie Provinces Circuit claims the following 
dates: Calgary, July 1st; Winnipeg, July 15th, Bran- 
don, July 22d; Regina, July 29th; Saskatoon, August 
5th; Edmonton, August 12th, and Vancouver, August 
12th. Many horses that participate on this Canadian 
circuit will undoubtedly be entered all the way down 
through Washington, Oregon and California, and fin- 
ish up at Phoenix, Arizona. It will be a money- 
winning journey if "they have the goods" from July 
1st until the middle of November. 



Onward 2:25% is the leading brood mare sire of 
1911. His daughters produced 22 of the new stand- 
ard performers, 16 trotters and six pacers. Baron 
Wilkes is third in rank, with ten trotters and nine 
pacers. Nutwood 2:18%, the leading sire of brood 
mares, with a total of 380 standard performers to 
the credit of his daughters, is fourth, his daughters 
having produced 17 of the new standard performers 
of 1911. 



The death of the two-year-old Ally Harvest Girl, 
by The Harvester 2:01, at Memphis, which occurred 
unexpectedly but a few days ago, has been a blow to 
Mr. Geers. Last season, as a yearling, with only a 
little work, she showed what was considered aston- 
ishing speed, and it was confidently believed that 
she would be a crack two-year-old, and thus start the 
career of The Harvester as a sire with a flourish, 
and very early. As she was Mr. Geers' own property, 
the loss to him is a double one. 



Parker Adams, of Vancouver, Wash., expects this 
season to race his five-year-old stallion, Buford Boy 
by Zombro, dam Alta by Altamont, second dam by 
Hambletonian Mambrino. Buford Boy was worked 
just a little by Mr. Davis last year, who started him 
in a pacing race the first day of The Dalles fair, 
winning second money in 2:27, and the next day 
starting him again in a trotting race and again 
winning second money, and this without changing a 
shoe, though he did wear hopples. 



The government recently purchased in Meade 
county, Kansas, a lot of Morgan colts sired by Head- 
light 4683, weight 1,150 pounds in working condition. 
This stallion was foaled on the open range among 
the bronchos, where his dam, a pure-bred Morgan 
from Vermont, had been running for a year. This 
occurred on March 4, 1893. Summer and winter he 
ran on the range with nothing but the native grasses 
for feed, except during the blizzards, until three years 
old, when he was put under a cowboy saddle and 
ridden to the annual roundup. The next few years 
he was the crack cow horse of the Southwest, both 
as a cutting horse and roper. He also won many 
cowboy races with a rider and seventy-five pound 
saddle. 



Vancouver, B. O, will end the so-called Prairie 
Circuit in Canada and begin the North Pacific Circuit. 
Manager H. S. Rolston, of Vancouver, looks for a 
big year. A beautiful plant is being built and the 
city of Vancouver is standing squarely behind the 
institution. They have put nearly $200,000 into the 
plant and are planning still greater improvements. 
They have a horse show building with an arena 
85x225 feet, and it is a beautiful structure. Every- 
thing in the plant is along these lines, and the city 
has placed $140,000 in the budget for the Vancouver 
exhibition of 1912. Last season Vancouver opened 
the North Pacific Circuit with four $5,000 stakes, 
given by the business men of the city, and with other 
purses and stakes in proportion. The consensus of 
opinion is that the association did not get the worth 
of their money in the contests offered. Just what 
the policy of 1912 will be in the harness division has 
not been announced, but will be known definitely 
after February 2d. 



There is a stallion in California that has been over- 
looked by our horse breeders because he has been 
so far away from where the best mares are, and this 
is the beautiful bay stallion Best Policy 42378. He 
is owned by R. O. Newman, of Visalia, Tulare county. 
It is this owner's intention, however, to send him to 
some good track to make the season of 1912, and 
then give him a record, as he has trotted halves 
without any wcrk (except being driven on the road) 
in 1:10. He was sired by Allerton 2:09%, the great- 
est of Jay Bird's speed producing sons, and his dam 
is Exine 2:18% (dam of Riverside (3) 2:30, and sis- 
ter to Extine dam of Bessie Maurine 2:15*4 and 
Samuel Lee 2:17%), by Expedition 2:15% (sire of 
Bon Voyage 2:08, etc.); second dam Euxine (dam 
of Euxenite 2:11%, and 5 others in 2:30), by Axtell 
2:12; third dam Russia 2:28 (dam of 1, and sister 
to Lord Russell, sire of Kremlin 2:07%, etc.), by 
Harold; fourth dam Miss Russell (dam of Maud S. 
2:08%, Sclavonic 2:09%, Nutwood 2:18%, and 4 
others in 2:30), by Pilot Jr., etc. His colts and fillies 
In Visalia are perfect in conformation and are the 
greatest field trotters a man ever saw. He was 
foaled in 1905 and his oldest is only three. He will 
make a splendid name as a race horse and sire, 
and cannot help it, judging by his pure gait and rich 
speed inheritance. His four dams are all in the 
great broodmare table. 



Snow six to eight inches deep on the level. 
Weather for the last two weeks zero and below 
nearly every morning. Fourteen below on Tuesday 
of this week. Not much doing among the trotters, 
but the trainers are very busy with the hot stove 
circuit meetings. Such are the present conditions 
in the Blue Grass country. 



THE BIG MEETING IN 1915. 



George H. Estabrook, of Denver, has made his 
regular annual purchase of a Grand Circuit per- 
former by sending to Indiana for Hal Wise, a fast 
sidewheeler who was campaigned over the half-mile 
rings last season very successfully. Estabrook paid 
$5,000 for this pacer, but thinks he got a bargain 
and predicts that he will prove just as a consistent 
a performer on the big rings as he has at former 
meetings. 



John E. Madden has claimed the name Wefers for 
the yearling half-brother of Colorado E. (3) 2:04%, 
which he bought from W. L. Spears last fall. This 
son of General Watts and Flossie McGregor is named 
for Barney Wefers, the famous sprinter among the 
American foot runners. George B. Hayes, who, it is 
understood, will train exclusively for the master of 
Hamburg Place and his sons in the future, will have 
the pleasure of giving Wefers his first lessons. 



Right now it looks as if Colorado E. (3) 2:04% 
had as good a chance of beating The Harvester's 
record as any stallion living, says the Denver Post. 
Billy Burk 2:03;4, Willy 2:05, and Gay Audubon 
record. But ol this quartet Colorado E. is thought 
of coming within hailing distance of the present 
record. Bu>. of this quartet Colorado E. ts thought 
to possess hf far the most speed. When placed in 
training last fall, Colorado E. worked halves in 1:00 
at Lexington, phoning that he had not lost his great 
speed exhibited as t three-year-old. Judging from 
this, it would seem as if the great colt owned by 
George E. Estabrook, Denver, Colo., had a chance of 
wresting the crown from The Harvester. 



A new trotting circuit is to be organized in West- 
ern Canada. It is being planned by the racing com- 
mittees in connection with the various fall fairs and 
will include meets at Calgary, Regina, Brandon, Win- 
nipeg, Prince Albert, Battleford, Edmonton, and 
Lethbridge. Each racing program will offer $10,500 
for harness races and $8,500 for running events. A 
meeting for the organization was held at Saskatoon, 
January 10th. The first race meeting will be held in 
June, and the chain will extend until just previous to 
the harvesting season. Purses will be hung up for 
trotters and pacers, and it is intended to attract 
horses from all parts of Canada and the States. 
Good tracks are already in operation at each of the 
towns and the new circuit, accordingly, will entail 
comparatively little expense. 



William Hendrickson's brown gelding Tom Hen- 
dricks and the bay gelding Jim Hendricks, that are 
now being worked at Pleasanton by Farmer Bunch, 
were by McKena (son of McKinney 2:11%, out of 
Helena 2:11%, by Electioneer 125), and out of Mowat 
by Owyhee 2:11, grandam Pippa (dam of Frank Dale 
2:23%) by Stilleco 1436; third dam Lucy E. (dam 
of Azalea 2:15 and Joe Scott 2:18) by Black Walnut 
17361; fourth dam Ethel by Eufield 128; fifth dam 
Betsie Trotwood by Peck's Idol; sixth dam Pilotta 
by Little John, and seventh dam Dairymaid by Ten- 
nessee. These geldings will be seen at the races this 
year. Mr. Hendrickson has a mare called Stanford 
Girl (in foal to The Bondsman) and Mary Hendricks, 
five-year-old, both are by McKena, out of Ohio by 
Peveril 2:14 (son of Elyria and Jenny D., dam of 
Gertrude 2:12 by Tom Hunter 935; second dam by 
Whiteline Jr., son of Whiteline 2144. And from what 
Farmer Bunch says this horse McKena will be the 
greatest sire of pure-gaited trotters ever bred in 
California, and if anybody doubts it let them come 
to Pleasanton and see these of Mr. Hendrickson's. 



o 

INFLUENCE OF INHERITANCE. 



Todd 2:14% now is credited with four sons that 
have sired standard performers, viz: Cochato (3) 
2:11%, sire of 16, and 14 of them trotters; Kentucky 
Todd (3), sire of five, all trotters; Sorrento Todd 
2:11, sire of one trotter, and Teddy Sentinel 2:26%, 
sire of one trotter. Cochato (3) 2:11%, Kentucky 
Todd (3) 2:08%, and Teddy Sentinel 2:26% were 
begotten before Todd 2:14% trotted to a record, 
and so was Bob Douglas 2:04%, the fastest of Todd's 
2:14% get. The dam of Cochato (3) 2:11% is Cas- 
tanea 2:19%, a mare of superior breeding and ex- 
treme natural speed, whose record, when she pro- 
duced Cochato (3) 2:11%, was 2:29%. She is also 
the dam of Bosun (p) 2:05%. The dam of Ken- 
tucky Todd (3) 2:08%, was the great brood mare 
Paronella, no record, but she is the dam of eight 
standard performers, all trotters, including Country 
Jay 2:05V4, Kentucky Todd (3) 2:08%, and Ormonde 
2:08%. 

The dam of Sorrento Todd 2:26% and Teddy Sen- 
tinel 2:11 was the great brood mare Sorrento (no 
record), but she is the dam of seven trotters with 
standard records. Four of the sons of Sorrento have 
sired standard record trotters. The two most noted 
of these sons are The Bondsman 37641, sire of the 
champion three-year-old trotter Colorado E. (3) 
2:04%, etc.; and Jay Hawker (3) 2:14%, sire of 
Country Jay 2:05%, etc. The dam of Bob Doug- 
las 2:04%, the fastest of the get of Todd 2:14%, Is 
the noted brood mare Glycezone, that had no record, 
but she also produced the trotter Polndexter 2:09. — 
Horse Review. 



Great Enthusiasm Shown by the Horsemen Appointed 
to Arrange for It. 

At a meeting of the directors of the Pacific Coast 
Trotting Horse Breeders' Association and the Park 
Amateur Driving Club, held at the Palace Hotel, 
Monday evening steps were taken toward giving the 
largest harness race meeting ever held in the United 
States. This is to take place at the Stadium, Golden 
Gate Park, in conjunction with a horse show and live- 
stock exhibition. 

The meeting was called to order by John A. Mc- 
Kerron, president of the Driving Club, and the fol- 
lowing committee, representing the two organiza- 
tions, was appointed to confer with the Park Com- 
missioners and the Fair Commissioners regarding 
the project: Captain William Matson, I. L. Borden, 
S. Christenson, A. L. Scott, Colonel J. C. Kirkpatrick, 
T. J. Crowley, Fred W. Kelley, Charles Paine, Senator 
Ben F. Rush, Fred W. Thompson, Charles A. Dur- 
fee, Thomas Bannan, Dr. Ira B. Dalziel and John A. 
McKerron. 

An important preliminary to be arranged will be 
to extend the Stadium track from its present length, 
three-quarters of a mile, to a mile. It will have to 
be widened on the homestretch so as to accommo- 
date the large fields of horses which will undoubtedly 
start in the extensively advertised stake and purse 
races to be given. As outlined, the proposition is to 
give a "big" meeting, open to horses from all parts 
of the world, the amounts to be raced for being from 
$2,000 to $25,000, and at least three at this last 
named figure will be given. The conditions of entry 
will be made so easy that every horse owner, breeder 
and trainer who has a likely looking "prospect" will 
make an entry. 

The leading Eastern reinsmen, such as Ed Geers, 
Thomas W. Murphy, William L. Snow, Walter H. 
Cox, Joe Serrill, A. S. Rodney, Clem Beachey Jr., 
Curt Gosnell, Harry Stinson, Lon McDonald, W. L. 
Rhodes, A. L. Case, D. McMahan, J. Dickerson, Billy 
Andrews, D. A. McEwen, Gus Macey and others, be- 
sides our home corps of efficient knights of the sulky, 
such as Charles Durfee, William Higgins, Will Dur- 
fee, Charles De Ryder, Elmo Montgomery, Charles 
James, Lon Daniels, Charles Spencer, Fred Chad- 
bourne, Frank Childs, Thomas Murphy, Charles 
Whitehead, Henry Helman, Walter Maben, Dick Wil- 
son, Fred Ward, James Sutherland, W. Liggitt, Al 
Schwartz, Joe Twohig, P. F. Davey, John Phippen, 
Samuel Hoy, J. Miller, Det Bigelow, H. S. Hogo- 
boom, W. Hogoboom, Lute Lindsey, Ben Walker, John 
Quinn and several from Australasia. These men will 
have the very best bred and fastest trotters and 
pacers — the cream of all stock farms. 

Many of these Eastern horsemen will bring their 
horses to the Phoenix and Los Angeles meetings of 
1914 and winter them on the famous tracks at this 
last named city, San Diego, Fresno, Salinas, San Jose, 
Pleasanton, Santa Rosa, Sacramento, Woodland, 
Marysville and Chico, and after this big meeting, 
which will doubtless take place during the latter part 
of July, they will be taken east to participate in the 
meetings on the Grand and Western Circuits. Some 
will remain to race on the Pacific Coast Circuit. 
Dates will be arranged for the best interests of all 
concerned. The arrival of so many famous horses will 
stimulate all interested in the trotting horse indus- 
try here and no doubt many of our visitors will buy 
stock farms and start in breeding horses on a large 
scale for they can be raised and developed quicker 
and cheaper than in any other part of the world. 

The attendance at this meeting each day should 
be over 30,000, while on days when the three big 
events are to take place there will probably be at 
least 100,000 people present. Excursions from all 
parts of the Pacific Coast and as far east as Chicago 
will be arranged for those who desire to attend this 
meeting, and at the same time see the greatest of all 
expositions. 

There will be no limit to the enthusiasm aroused 
by the announcement that such a meeting is to be 
held, and as most of the men appointed have had 
years of the most successful experience in conducting 
fairs and race meetings, there can be no doubt of 
its ultimate success financially as well as for the best 
interests of the horsemen, farmers and breeders. 

The horse show in connection therewith will attract 
the best specimens of the equine family in the 
United States, Europe, Canada and Mexico. The sum 
of $6000 has been set aside for premiums in the 
saddle horse class and some claim that $20,000 will 
be awarded for premiums in carriage horses. 

The livestock exhibit in this fine climate will sur- 
pass any ever given in Chicago or St. Louis, and 
arrangements will be made with the railroads and 
steamship companies regarding transportation rates 
that will be conducive to attracting a large entry 
list in every class. 

California will be more directly benefited by this 
portion of the exposition than any other, for, as a 
livestock growing State, it is rapidly forging to the 
front. 

front. The breeders here are paying high prices 
for the best cattle, sheep, and hogs. The dairying 
industry is increasing far more rapidly in proportion 
to the population than in any other State in the 
Union, and everyone engaged in it finds it one of the 
best of paying industries. Buyers from all parts of 
the world will attend this big exhibit and many 
sales will take place. Steps are being taken to en- 
gage the services of the most competent and best 
qualified superintendent of livestock exhibits in 
America In order that all the details of this great 
department will be satisfactory to exhibitors. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



| ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

§ CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeA ITT. | 



ANOTHER CONTRABAND GAME SEIZURE. 



Why go to the Suisun marsh or any other shooting 
grounds to hunt, ducks? Wild ducks are plentiful in 
this city .enough so to enable a score of hunters to 
l>ag, last Saturday morning, 609 ducks — cans, sprigs, 
teal, spconeys, mallards, in fact as good a variety of 
prime, fat birds as our best shooting grounds pro- 
duce. 

This wild game coup was arranged by the Fish and 
Game Commission and carried out by Desk Deputy 
J. S. Hunter and a score of deputies called in from 
Marin, Sonoma, Napa, Sacramento, Contra Costa, San 
Mateo, Santa Clara and Alameda counties, to aid the 
squad of local deputies. 

Twenty-one search warrants issued Friday was the 
"open sesame" sign hung on every cold storage, dry 
storage or old horse bin under the control of each 
and every dealer doing business in the California 
Market. 

Six hundred and nine ducks confiscated meant 
duckless dinners for at least 300 gourmets last Sun- 
day. One hundred and fifty cottontails argued a 
famine in the line of broiled game delicacies. All 
this through the carelessness of the dealers in being 
caught napping. 

So sanguine was the Board in its desire to make a 
successful raid that Commodore Nidever and Chief 
Engineer Christianson of the Quinnat were requisi- 
tioned to active shore duty. 

Unless the commission houses, agents of the Hunt- 
ers' Express Company, supplied the dealers later in 
the day, ducks were at a premium in many hotels, 
restaurants, clubs and private residences for the Sun- 
day diners. 

Lucky immunity from seizure was the lot of dif- 
ferent bunches of ducks, left in cold storage or for 
picking, properly tagged and accounted for as the 
legitimate property of private citizens. 

Deputy Commissioners were on guard at every 
point of ingress or egress of the market at 8 a. m. 
These sentinels were instructed to examine every- 
thing coming in or going out that savored of ducks, 
quail, snipe or fish infractions of the law. 

When the outside chain of cynosure was fastened, 
two searching squads under Deputies Clark and Fair- 
field, fortified with search warrants for every recep- 
tacle of game, poultry, fish, meats, etc. — cold-storage 
apartments and provision lockers — in the big food 
emporium, immediately got busy. 

The California Poultry Company and O'Brien, 
Spotorno & Mitchell stalls received initial attention. 

First blood was drawn by Deputy Meissner, who 
grabbed a sack of ducks sent up through the Cali- 
fornia-street elevator. 

The search of the latter named establishment re- 
sulted in the seizure of 580 ducks and 150 cottontail 
rabbits, their totals being grossly in excess of the 
legal allowance. 

The dragnet thrown over the California Poultry 
Company's stalls drew but twenty-nine ducks, all 
mallards. 

While the officers were busy here, a driver for the 
Hunters' Express Company arrived with bags of 
geese and ducks. One bag of ducks was offered, and 
when the bearer spotted the deputies, an attempt 
was made to run the blockade through Summer 
street. Deputy Armstrong stopped the sprint, and 
gathered in the ducks. This lot was the subject of 
a spirited argument by the poultry men, responsi- 
bility and custody being declined. The sack was 
assigned to the general junk pile, awaiting a claimant. 

The sudden appearance of the land and naval 
forces of the Fish and Game Commission temporarily 
paralyzed the routine of the market. Efforts on the 
part of interested employes to sequester contraband 
ptock were ineffective. 

In one cellar a dozen Italian duck pickers were 
thrown into a panic by the invading forces. The 
suggestion by the boss picker to pick geese and drop 
the ducks was followed quickly. The wise deputies, 
however, found in several boxes limit numbers of 
ducks under the mantle of feathers. 

An alleged practice by one firm in keeping within 
the letter of the law so far as possession of the legal 
quota of ducks or other game is concerned caused an 
almost non-productive search in one instance. Game 
orders of this firm, it is claimed, are usually filled as 
required by telephone requisition on outside commis- 
sion house depots. 

Six sacks of ducks, shipped from different points 
by market hunters in care of the Hunters' Express 
Company, consigned to different individuals, were 
not taken from O'Brien, Spotorno & Mitchell's stand. 
The contention was that these birds were private 
property, legitimately shipped, and not held in vio- 
lation of the law and the bags were not in excess of 
the legal limit. 

The searching squads were equipped with electric 
lamps, also rods and hooks, that enabled a thorough 
search and overhauling of every nook and cranny on 
the main floor and in the dark and labyrinthine cel- 
lar of the big market. As an instance of the thor- 
oughness of the search, a huge waste and garbage 
pile in the cellar was shoveled over to disclose if any 
attempt had been made to plant in an unsuspected 
spot contraband game. 



The rakeover of the fish stalls drew blank. In 
one of the market restaurant lockers, however, sev- 
eral pounds of undersized trout were discovered. 
This find was declared immune from seizure when 
the restaurant man produced a properly receipted 
bill for the fish, which had been raised in private 
ponds and sold by the California Trout Farm Com- 
pany. 

During the winnowing of the cold-storage boxes in 
the market cellar the searchers found intact and 
properly sealed a large assortment of Japanese wood- 
cock, Chinese ducks and pheasants, Asiatic quail and 
other table delicacies belonging to the commissary 
department of the steamer Manchuria. This game 
consignment was held in escrow until the Oriental 
liner departs from this port on a return voyage, the 
tolerated custom being to allow these adjuncts of the 
steamship larders to be properly taken care of while 
in port for use on the return voyage. 

The rank and file of Deputy Hunter's forces were: 
Deputies R. B. Heacock, M. S. Clark, Carl Miessner, 
J. L. Bundock, A. M. Fairfield and Ernest Bouchard 
of San Francisco; George Neale of Sacramento; F. 
H. Smith of San Mateo, W. J. Sedgeley of Oakland, 
Earle Downing of Pleasanton, t. L. Koppel and F. 
W. Robbins of San Jose, W. H. Armstrong of Val- 
lejo, O. M. Emerald and Sid Cavil from Marin county, 
W. H. Moore of Napa, F. Thomas, Captain W. B. 
Nidever and Engineer Jake Christianson. 

The ducks and rabbits seized were distributed 
among different charitable institutions this week. 

FISH AND GAME COMMISSION WORK. 

In pursuance of its policy to take the people of the 
State into its confidence in regard to all fish and 
game problems the State Fish and Game Commission 
has indited a letter to the press of the State, through 
which it hopes to get the co-operation of all who 
are interested in game protection, game propagation 
and the enforcement of the game laws. 

The Commission wants the fact thoroughly adver- 
tised that the fish and game of the State belong to 
The People as a whole and that each one of them 
ought to take an individual interest in preserving 
it against the aggressions of pot hunters, lawbreakers 
and monopolies. The State goes on the basis that 
every person, whether he is a sportsman or not, is 
vitally concerned in the question of whether the game 
supply is kept up and available so that it can be 
purchased or hunted by the fairly well-to-do as well 
as the very well-to-do 

Therefore, the Commission is inviting "all hands 
and the cook" to join the Pish and Game Protective 
Association, which is to co-operate and advise with 
the Commission as to game laws and any other mat- 
ter touching the public's welfare. It only costs 25 
cents to become a member of the ssociation. The 
25 cents is initiation fee and dues for a year all in 
one. Sending the money to State Treasurer E. D. 
Roberts is tne only formality connected with the 
enterprise. 

The membership of the Association now foots up 
3,000 in round numbers. They include men in all 
walks of life, hunters, fishers and men and women 
who never hunted or fished in their lives, yet take an 
interest. Senators George C. Perkins and John D. 
Works, and Congressmen John E. Raker, William 
Kent, S. C. Smith and E. A. Hayes are some of the 
members who, besides paying their twenty-five cents, 
have premised their support in anything either the 
Association or the Commission want. 

One of the first things the Commission will ask 
the Asociation to do will be to help to put into effect 
a law that will insure to The People the right to 
fish in any mountain stream running through uncul- 
tivated lands that have been stocked with fish by 
the State. The accomplishment of that end alone 
is worth ten times twenty-five cents the Commission 
says. 

The Commission also wishes to emphasize the fact 
that this is the first time The People of California 
have ever been asked to advise with the Fish and 
Game Commission in any matter. Previous Com- 
missions have regarded it as a divine right for them 
to regulate game questions to suit themselves and to 
make the most of it in the convention. There will 
be no graft here — only straight goods and value for 
the money, every cent of which will be used for a 
legitimate purpose and accounted for 

Information circulars and membership blanks can 
be obtained at the office of the Breeder and Sports- 
man, 3G6 Pacific Building, San Francisco. 

o 

George and Thomas Steel, for 40 years residents 
of Spokane county, most of the time ranchers at 
Spangle, have gene to the Olympic mountains on a 
three years' hunting and trapping trip. They 
have with them a pack of Airedale bear dogs, 
guns and ammunition of the finest, and to 
make sure that nothing is overlooked, they have 
arranged with a St. Louis firm to handle the furs that 
they expect to collect in their winter camps. E. N. 
Woydt, former chief of police for Spokane, and the 
Steels organized the Spangle Rod and Gun Club in 
territorial days. 



HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGES IN CALIFORNIA. 



The introduction of Hungarian partridges into this 
State has developed the fact that in some favorable 
localities they thrive and in other sections they are 
seen but few times after liberation. The favorable 
habitats for this hardy game bird are in rough coun- 
try and high altitudes, up to the timber line. In 
this respect the bird is only following natural in- 
stincts, for in Europe the haunts of the bird are of 
the same comparative topographical and climatic 
similarity as are the districts in this State that have 
proved congenial to its existence. 

In the lower altitudes, where plowed lands and 
pasture fields offer exposure in open ground, the ex- 
periment of transplanting has been, with but few 
exceptions, unsatisfactory. Hawks and ground ver- 
min are given credit for destroying the immigrants 
in rather short order. 

The pot hunter has also been, it is claimed by in- 
terested observers, no small factor in local exter- 
mination of the foreign partridges. 

That the sturdy birds have made a brave fight 
for existence in unsuitable territory is evinced in 
numerous instances. These partridges have been 
found many miles from where they were first turned 
loose, seemingly traveling to the more natural en- 
vironment of a mountainous country, where they 
could find food, shelter and safety from biped, quad- 
ruped and winged enemies. 

One trait of these partridges, wherein they are 
like our valley quail, is the disposition to remain in 
proximity to ranches — provided they are unmolested 
by the people of the vicinity. 

The Fish and Game Commission has distributed 
about 1500 pairs of Hungarian partridges during the 
last three or four years. Most of these birds were 
imported. What birds in the future will be liber- 
ated will be stock raised at the State game farms, 
the expense of further importing the partridges not 
being warranted, and enough birds can be raised 
for stocking favorable districts. Provided the birds 
are not decimated by unscrupulous hunters, there is 
no doubt but what they will increase, and this in 
territory that is rejected by the valley quail and by the 
mountain quail in winter, but is satisfactory to the 
pine grouse. Both the latter bird and its foreign 
cousin are hardy, and find existence agreeable in a 
rigorous winter country, where other varieties of 
game birds would perish. 

Recent inquiry concerning results in putting out 
Hungarian partridges in many localities has devel- 
oped information that no doubt will lead to the utli- 
mate success of the experiment of introducing into 
this State the foreign game bird. 

Excerpts from letters received by the Fish and 
Game Commission are interesting. They follow: 

Ernest Butter of French Creek, near Shingle, El 
Dorado county, received several pairs of young par- 
tridges a year ago. These birds were penned up and 
taken care of until well grown. After liberation, for 
several weeks the birds would come back to the 
cages, where feed was placed for them. Last spring, 
when natural food was abundant in the foothills, the 
partridges left and were seen no more. Young par- 
tridges were reported as having been seen on Butter's 
ranch last summer. 

Harry Cash of Shasta valley, near Sisson, states 
that he liberated birds three years ago near his ranch 
on the east side of the valley, at the base of the 
Goose Nest mountain. These birds left the lower 
levels the following spring and were afterward seen 
at an elevation of 6000 feet in the pine timber and 
bluff, rocky region. They were wary, quick and 
fleet of wing. 

This report followed a statement made two years 
ago to Cash by A. Berry of Gazelle that birds the 
latter turned out there were afterwards seen in the 
pine timber altitudes and apparently thriving. 

Assemblyman D. E. Williams of Fresno liberated 
six pairs of Hungarian partridges in the Red hills, 
about three miles below Chinese Camp. Red hills 
has the reputation of being the most barren stretch 
of country in the county, interspersed with heavy 
growths of chaparral. 

Last November W. G. Scott and Henry Menke of 
Soulsbyville, while quail hunting, saw a covey of 
sixty partridges, by actual count, near where the 
original birds were put out. The birds were appar- 
ently feeding on and about anthills. Numerous ant- 
hills gave evidence of the presence of feeding birds. 
These partridges are decidedly insectiverous at cer- 
tain seasons. Other parties have also seen this 
covey, the increase being estimated at fifty birds. 

Deputy Andy Ferguson of Fresno offers the sug- 
gestion that Hungarian partridges are better adapted 
to a mountainous district than foothill regions or 
valley sections. 

A liberal consignment of birds was turned out in 
the Rhoeding vineyard, six miles west of Fresno, in 
the heart of the vineyard section of the valley. 
Water, cover, wild grasses, etc., were abundant. 
These birds were seen occasionally at intervals dur- 
ing eight months, after which they apparently dis- 
appeared. 

Ferguson made a second plant of two dozen birds 
in the first foothills east of Fresno, where water, 
feed and cover were plentiful. The batch was never 
afterward heard of nor accounted for. His third 
plant was at Traweek's place, on the Millwood road, 
at an elevation of 3500 feet, just where the oaks and 
pines mingle. Here three dozen partridges were lib- 
erated. Traweek reported subsequently that several 
coveys of young partridges were observed the fol- 
lowing year. Other reliable reports were that scat- 
tered coveys were seen within a radius of five miles 
of the place of original planting. 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Residents of that section state that the partridges 
are in that country now in considerable numbers. 
The only menace to their increase is the possibility 
of their being shot through ignorance by visiting 
hunters. The ranchers thereabouts give the birds all 
the protection possible. Ferguson further states that 
three coveys of Mongolian or ringneck pheasants were 
seen last year in the mountains of that district at 
an elevation of 8000 feet and fully twenty miles from 
any habitation. 

Last year partridges were released on the Chow 
Chilla ranch, in the country lying along the San 
Joaquin river. These birds are reported to have 
increased to a very satisfactory extent. 

Hungarian partridges released in Kings county are 
still found on the ranchees where first put out. These 
grounds, however, come under the general head of 
bottom lands. 

o 

STYLE IN SHOOTING. 



Of all the tantalizing things that one experiences 
when shooting, there are few more irritating than 
to be out with a man who is a muddling, hesitating 
shot — the man who is most anxious to kill with every 
cartridge, and lets half the game escape without 
being shot at, states a writer in the English Shooting 
Times.. He is a fairly certain shot when game gets 
up at his feet and gives him plenty of time for aim- 
ing, but after dropping one bird out of a covey he 
never attempts to fire his second barrel. Take him 
into cover. A rabbit crosses the ride; up goes his 
gun, and after vainly trying to aim, down it comes 
again. A pheasant rises at thirty yards, offering 
an easy chance, but soon puts a tree between itself 
and the breechloader. Our muddler again puts up 
his gun, half takes it down, then tries to align it 
through the branches of the tree, and finally gives 
it up. This kind of thing is most irritating to us, 
and especially so when we have refrained from tak- 
ing the shots ourself. After a good deal of repetition 
of this performance we cannot hold our tongue, so 
we ask why he didn't fire, or if he had his gun on 
"safe." 

We would not mind if the man would but shoot, 
but this pottering hesitation is must provoking, and 
no doubt many a man has lost not a few invitations 
to shoot on account of it. There is no style about 
it, and one would far sooner see a man miss right 
and left in good style than to kill in a clumsy, un- 
workmanlike kind of way. 

The advice one would like to give to such sports- 
men is — adopt a good quick style of shooting, and 
stick to it. 

There appear to be but four definite styles of 
shooting, and all deviation from these is only a mod- 
ification of one of them. The distinctness of each 
style and the difference of one from another is most 
noticeable when those who adopt different styles are 
performing together at driven game. 

Style 1. — The gun is swung on to the game and 
ahead of it all in one motion. 

Style 2. — The gun is aligned on the game and then 
jerked forward. 

Style 3. — The aim is taken without swing or jerk 
at a spot ahead of the game, and the shot so timed 
that pellets and game arrive there simultaneously. 

Style 4. — The gun is aligned dead on the game, 
which is followed up, and the trigger is pulled whilst 
the gun is pointing "dead on" and moving the same 
pace as the object. 

Those who adopt this last style are, as a rule, but 
poor shots at driven winged game. For one reason, 
it is a slow style, and by the time one barrel has 
been fired, he who adopts either of the styles 1, 2 
and 3, will have emptied his first gun. 

At rabbits in the open, or pigeons from a trap, the 
adopter of No. 4 sometimes does exceedingly well. 
I knew a young farmer who shot in this way, and he 
could kill from twenty to thirty rabbits or pigeons 
without a miss. He was an almost certain shot with 
his first barrel at any game in the open. But this 
style, besides being too slow, is also dangerous, be- 
cause a man who holds on to his game sees nothing 
beyond it, and he has been known to cover, one after 
the other, a whole row of beaters and keepers whilst 
holding on to a low-flying bird. 

Styles Nos. 1 and 2 are, I think, those mostly 
adopted by the best shots. Of the two, perhaps 
No. 1 is the prettier, and to shoot in this style with 
the best effect the gun is not first placed to he 
shoulder and then moved on to the game, but the 
muzzle is swung in the direction the game is moving 
as the gun is being brought to the shoulder, and the 
quicker the swing is made the further is the shot- 
charge thrown in front of the game, and if the trig- 
ger should be pulled when the muzzles are actually 
pointing a foot or so behind the game, the latter will 
often be killed, because the shot is carried in the 
direction in which the game is moving — beyond the 
spot at which the gun was actually pointing when it 
exploded — by the impetus of the swing. 

I have on several occasions swung very quickly 
after rabbits, and unintentionally pulled the trigger 
when my gun was pointing a good foot to the rear, 
but have nevertheless bagged my rabbit. I well re- 
member the first time I had a good opportunity of 
watching a practical exponent of this style. He was 
using three guns, and I counted for him. Although 
not ranked amongst the first class pheasant shots, 
in half an hour he killed a hundred and nineteen 
pheasants at the expense of a hundred and fifty 
cartridges — not at all a bad exhibition, especially when 
we take into account that all the birds were going 
fast. Several were "tall" ones, and some were 



almost hidden by the tree, through the branches 
ot which they had to be shot. 

Style No. 2 is that in which many sportsmen shoot, 
and perhaps lends itself to greater rapidity of firing 
than No. 1, The muzzles of the gun are got on to 
the game, quickly jerked ahead of it, and the trigger 
is pulled as the end of the jerk is reached. This 
style is quite different from No. 1 — a conclusion any 
observant person would immediately come to on 
watching these two styles at the same time. Some 
years ago I watched a gentleman who was then con- 
sidered the best pheasant shot in England perform- 
ing in Style ?, and the rapidity with which he killed 
his birds was wonderwul. I have seen him kill four 
birds so quickly that they were all dead in the air 
at the same tie. 

Style 3 is the quickest of all, because there is no 
time spent on either swing or jerk. The gun is fired 
at a spot where it is calculated the game will be by 
the time the shot gets there. I have seen very few 
men adopt this plan, and could never succeed with 
it myself, but those coming under my notice have 
certainly shot well. 

One is sometimes asked the question, "Is it best to 
shoot with both eyes open, or to shut the one that 
is not directly over the rib?" The right eye would, 
of course be over the rib when shooting from the 
right shoulder, and the left eye when shooting from 
the left shoulder. Most decidedly, shoot with both 
open; and I think this will be the advice of nearly 
everyone who has had much experience. For one 
reason, it is much quicker. Also, If the eye not align- 
ing the gun be closed, the area of vision is much con- 
tracted, and when snipe hunting, if a bird flying 
straightaway should suddenly dip when only the eye 
looking over the rib of the gun is open, the shooter 
loses sight of the bird; he likewise loses sight of a 
bird flying overhead straight towards him, when he 
has got in front of it. Moreover, should the stronger 
eye be closed, as is generally the case with the 
one-eyed system, a bird will often look ten yards fur- 
ther away when seen only by the weaker eye than it 
does a fraction of a second before — when both eyes 
are open. 

But although the two-eyed system would be recom- 
mended by a large majority of the experienced game- 
shots, it is nevertheless a fact that one of the finest 
wing shots ever known, who was also a wonderful 
performer at glass balls, advises shooters to shut one 
eye and glance along the rib with the other. He is 
the only noted shot that I know of who advises this 
method. 

Whichever method be adopted, let the shooter avoid 
anything of a poking style, or that induces to excep- 
tional slowness. This kind of thing exasperates 
both keepers and hosts; the one mutters under his 
breath and the other makes resolutions for the future. 

o 

ANOTHER OLD TIME SPORTSMAN GONE. 

Crittenden Robinson, a charter member of the Cali- 
fornia Wing Club and a prominent trap shooter here 
forty years ago, died in this city last week. 

For the past fifteen years he had made his home 
in Paris. Several manths ago he returned to San 
Francisco to visit relatives. Two weeks ago he 
was taken suddenly ill but never rallied. 

Crit. Robinson was noted here as a game and 
expert shot, particularly in live bird matches. 

During his residence abroad he was a frequent 
contender at all of the trap shooting centers from 
Monte Carlo down and he was generally in the 
money. His last appearance at a live bird shoot 
was at the California Wing Club grounds at Stege 
about two months ago at an impromptu shoot. 

Several weeks ago he was the guest of Frank 
Maskey and also or Achille Roos at the Suisun marsh 
preserves of these two sportsmen. Needless to say 
"Crit" did limit work. He was over 70 years of age 
when the end came. 

o 

Protect the Doves. — Dove shooting last season was 
the most uncertain of sports. One party would go 
to the same localitl and never see a feather, states 
an Oroville sportsman. 

The best shooting in this section is now found in 
the stubble fields south and west of Oroville. It is 
almost an impossibility however to secure a limit 
sized bag. 

It is more than probable that it will be but a few 
years before dove shooting will become a thing of 
the past. Agriculturists are beginning to learn that 
the dove is one of their best friends as it is a per- 
sistent weed killer and already the demand has gone 
out not only in California, but over the entire coun- 
try for a total protection of this valuable bird. The 
matter has been brought to the attention of the au- 
thorities a Washington and investigations on full 
grown birds have demonstrated that often a bird 
will destroy 10,000 seeds of weed. 

Over on the west side of the Sacramento Valley 
many large landowners have prohibited the shooting 
of doves on their holdings on this ground, and sev- 
eral States in the East have passed a stringent law 
protecting the dove and are now endeavoring to in- 
terest the authorities at Washington in a law that 
will protect them in their migration to the South- 
land in winter. 

California agriculturists point out the inconsist- 
ency of the game laws of the State. They protect 
the meadow lark, a bird that pulls up the early 
wheat to get at the root, and no ho dove, a bird that 
is the greatest aid to the farmer. 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



BENCH SHOW NOTES. 

The premium list of the fourteenth annual bench 
show of the San Francisco Kennel Club will be 
printed about the end of this week and mailed to the 
dog fanciers of this city and other centers of dog- 
dom. The classification this year will be a liberal 
one with the pleasing addenda of many valuable 
trophies and cups for the exhibitors of winning dogs. 

i he show will be on record as a patron of utility 
breeds of dogs. While the pet varieties will be am- 
ply provided for in the way of medals and prizes, 
the bent of the times leads to a greater recognition 
of dogs that are favored by the sportsman and the 
breeder of dogs that are built on the lines of useful 
appreciation. 

Advices from interior points of this State, from 
Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, as well 
as trom Colorado and Utah, supplemented by a signal 
of stanch support from Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas 
City, leads to the belief that the coming bench show 
of the club, under the rules of the National Dog 
Breeders' Association, will be one of the best exhi- 
bitions of dog breeders yet given in this city. 



An abortive attempt at disruption is intimated in 
the following account' of a meeting in San Jose. 

Disagreements which arose over the "outlawry" 
of the San Jose Kennel Club shook the union of that 
organization and the Santa Clara County Poultry 
Asociation to its foundations last Saturday night, but 
union came out triumphant in the end, with the loss 
of but one of its officers nominated to serve the joint 
association. The societies have been giving an an- 
nual poultry, dog and pet stock show in San Jose 
which has attracted statewide attention. 

The annual meeting was scheduled Saturday night, 
and when the nominating committee made its report 
James B. Bullitt, a poultry fancier, objected to serv- 
ing for the reason that he would be "blacklisted" by 
the American Kennel Club for serving as an 
officer of an "insurgent" kennel club. He had been 
nominated for first vice-president. It was agreed 
to leave the names of the officers out of the annual 
show catalogue and he was persuaded to .serve 
James C. Rea, named for third vice-president, would 
serve under no regime which "compromised with 
evil," and his name was withdrawn. It was then 
show catalogue and he was persuaded to serve, 
the Kennel Club exclusively, the other officers serv- 
ing both. The first vice-president is Roy E. Parks 
and the third vice-president is C. H. Freeman. 

The joint officers are: President, E. R. Eventt; 
first vice-president, James B. Bullitt; second vice- 
president, F. E. Baldwin; third vice-president, C. H. 
Freeman; fourth vice-president, E. B. Smith; fifth 
vice-president, Charles Emery; association secreteary, 
George B. Greenleaf; show secretary, Charles R. 
Marker; auditors, George Leamann, M. E. Goss; 
treasurer H. M. Billings; executive committee, V. J. 
Ruh, A. B. McKean, J. D. Bennett, W. E. Lewis, W. 
S. Sullivan, Henry Berrar, Charles R. Marker. 

The Golden Gate Kennel Club show will come off 
in March at Dreamland Rink. 

o— 

AIREDALES AS DOGS OF WAR. 



Britain has a little account to settle with the Abors 
of Assam, in which a team of Airedales will assist. 
Last spring the Abor tribe which inhabits a wild and 
mountainous tract of land between China and India, 
one of the very few unexplored lands, murdered Mr. 
N Williamson, a British officer, and his party. 

Lord Crewe sanctioned a punitive expedition to 
proceed against them, and a Goorkha regiment has 
marched into the unknown Oriental territory, taking 
with them the Airedale dogs, specially ordered from 
Major Richardson by the India Office, to act as sen- 
tries and scouts in the dense jungle. 

"This is the first time in the military history of 
the British Empire that the employment of war dogs 
has been officially recognized," states Major Rich- 
ardson. "The India Office gave me an order to sup- 
ply scouting and sentry dogs to the Goorkhas for the 
forthcoming expedition, and I sent out about half a 
dozen trained Airedales. The Airedale is as near the 
ideal war dog as it is possible to get. They are 
hardy and strong and possess good noses and very 
keen ears. One of the dogs that has been chosen 
to go, named Loch, whilst training in the county 
winded'— that is, scented — a tramp at a distance of 
250 yards. Every foreign army has its own way of 
training war dogs, which varies according to the 
work they have to do. Some are trained to bark as 
a warning, others to work silently. These dogs, for 
the Abor expedition, will give a quiet growl as a 
warning of danger, or signal of discovery. 

"In the descriptions of the massacre of Mr. Noel 
Williamson's party, published last April, it was 
stated that the Abors themselves used dogs when 
hunting the coolies who were endeavoring to make 
their escape, and the fact that the Abors have dogs 
makes it more necessary that the British froce 
should employ them, too. Our scouting dogs, with 
the attacking force, will be able to give warning of 
the presence of the enemy before their dogs on the 
defensive know of our approach. In a battle between 
dogs I should be sorry for the Abor dog In the grip 
of one of our Airedales." 

o 

Frank Swanson, a rancher near Troy, Mont., had 
a narrow escape from death on January 18 while 
working in the woods on his ranch. He was sur- 
prised by three mountain lions, and after a des- 
perate battle succeeded in killing two. The third 
escaped. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIALS. 



With clear and pleasant weather as the only favor- 
able condition, the twenty-ninth annual trials of the 
Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, was begun at Gosford, 
near Bakersfleld, Monday, January 22, with the Derby 
stake, the first, second and third honors of which 
were captured in the order named by the following 
English setters Agua Caliente, a game, fine going 
puppy of great speed and range, owned by F. J. Ruh- 
staller of Sacramento; Melrose Danstone, a stylish, 
consistenly working little dog with a merry tail, 
owned by John W. Considine of Seattle, and Judge 
Post, a puppy of fair range and exceptional speed, 
that is owned by Judge Carroll Cook of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the opinion of the members of the club, condi- 
tions for a successful meeting on the grounds used 
have never been more unfavorable than at that time. 
There was a marked scarcity of birds, due princi- 
pally to the constant and out-of-season shooting by 
trespassers, it was claimed, and the fact that the 
birds were also believed to have been killed off by 
eating poisoned barley, designed to exterminate 
ground squirrels. Lack of cover was another unfavor- 
able condition, the grass of the preserve having been 
eaten off by stock. The fact that no rain had fallen 
lately, thereby making scenting of the comparatively 
few birds difficult, is further cited as a handicap. 

Although twenty dcgs were entered for the Derby 
stake, only four braces and one bye, nine dogs in all 
started. These were put down in the first series in 
the order named: Melrose Danstone and Babe, Agua 
Caliente and Mackenzie's Bobs, Judge Post and Bud- 
die, Joconde and Master Rhoderick, Bohemian Prince, 
a bye. 

The first series of the All-Age started Tuesday 
morning. Bird conditions were then more to the 
liking of those present than prevailed Monday, a 
large number of singles and coveys being found. 

T. C. Dodge's Kent's Hal was put down with J. 

E. Terry's Shasta Queen. The pointer displayed good 
style, pace and range, while Shasta Queen showed 
wonderfully fast pace and wide range, and an intel- 
ligent quartering of ground. After being out of 
sight for a period of fifteen minutes she was found 
stanchly pointing a big covey of birds. St. Lam- 
bert's Doris, owned by George B. M. Gray, made an 
unfavorable showing against William Dormer's Mag- 
gie Lauder. The latter was much the better of the 
two in pace, range and style. Both, however, failed 
to find any birds. 

Gordon Tevis' Alford's Blue Ribbon, a handsome, 
nicely going pointer, braced with Melrose Mac, made 
two singles, while her competitor ranged well at a 
good pace and made one single. 

Old Forester, owned by J. E. Chanslor, and Chula, 
Lloyd Tevis' pointer, were next cast off. Forester did 
some exceptional work and was easily the best of 
the two in style, bird work, range and pace. Con- 
sidering the fact that Chula was not yet fully re- 
covered from an attack of distemper, she did well, 
making a fine bevy point. 

When put down, Benvenuto and Light, two Eng- 
lish setters owned by T. J. A. Tiedemann and F. J. 
Ruhstaller, respectively, went off in beautiful style, 
the latter being a little the faster. Benvenuto located 
a covey, which he roaded quite a long distance, finally 
establishing his point stanchly. Light displayed style 
and made two nice single points. 

Lad of Kent Jr., Lansing Tevis' pointer, ran his 
bye with J. W. Flynn's old reliable pointer, Sen- 
ators Don, and he proved a fine, strong-going dog of 
good range and under perfect control. He found a 
covey, which he roaded and then made several sin- 
gles in good style. Senators Don also worked well, 
making four single-bird points. 

The Championship stake having been called off 
by unanimous vote of the members in attendance, the 
trials came to a close late Wednesday afternoon with 
the conclusion of the Members stake. 

The honors of the Members stake were decided 
by Messrs. Betten, Tiedemann and Schumacher, offi- 
ciating as judges, in the following order: First, Peach 
Nugget, an English setter bitch owned by S. Chris- 
tenson; second, Trap, a pointer, Gordon Tevis, and 
third, Sister, pointer bitch, Lansing Tevis. No cash 
prizes, in addition to the cups, were awarded in this 
stake. 

Bakersfleld, Cal., January 22, 1911— Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club's twenty-ninth annual Derby. Purse 
$300— 50, 30 and 20 per cent. Cups also to placed 
dogs. Twenty nominations, 9 starters, all English set- 
ters. Judges, H. L. Betten and T. J. A. Tiedemann. 
I. 

Melrose Daistone, black, white and tan English set- 
ter dog (Scott's Count Danstone — ); J. W. 

Considine, owner. 

with 

Babe, black, white and tan English setter bitch 
( ); Geo. B. M. Gray, owner. 

Agua Caliente, black, white and tan English setter 
dog (Sensation — Kils Moxie); W. B. Coutts, owner, 
with 

Mackenzie's Bobs, English setter dog ( 

) ; J. W. McKenzie, owner. 

Judge Post, blue and tan belton English setter dog 
(Master Courtney — Lightheart); Carroll Cook, owner, 
with 

Buddie, English setter dog (breeding not given): 

F. C. Berry, owner. 

Joconde, blue and tan belton English setter bitch 
(Master Courtney — Lightheart); C. N. Post, owner. 



with 

Master Rhoderick. 

Bohemian Prince, black white and tan English set- 
ter dog (Sensation — Kils Moxie); E. C. Ford, owner; 

a bye. 

II. 

Agua Caliente with Melrose Danstone. 
Judge Post with Bohemian Prince. 

Result. 

First, Agua Caliente; second, Melrose Danstone; 
third, Judge Post. 

Bakersfleld, Cal., January 23, 1911 — Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club's twenty-ninth annual All-Age. 
Purse $300 — 50, 30 and 20 per cent, also cups to 
placed dogs. Fifteen nominations, 11 starters. 
Judges, J. H. Schumacher, J. W. Flynn and H. L. 
Betten. 

I. 

Kent's Hal, liver and white pointer dog ( 

) ; T. C. Dodge, owner. 

with 

Shasta Queen, white and orange English Setter 
bitch (Count Whitestone — Glimmer); J. E. Terry, 
owner. 

St. Lambert's Doris, red Irish setter ( 

) ; Geo. B. M. Gray, owner. 

with 

Maggie Lauder, white, black and tan English setter 
bitch (El Ciervo — Kils May); Wm. Dormer, owner. 

Alford's Blue Ribbon, liver and white pointer bitch 

( ); Gordan Tevis, owner. 

with 

Old Forester, blue belton English setter dog (Count 
Whitestone — Harter's Cleopatra); Jos. E. Chanslor, 
owner. 

Chula, liver and white pointer bitch ( 

) ; Lloyd Tevis, owner. 

with 

Melrose Mac, white, black and tan English setter 
dog (McCloud Boy ) ; J. W. Considine, owner. 

Benvenuto, white, black and tan English setter dog 

(Lemon's Rodfield ); T. J. A. Tiedemann, 

owner. 

with 

Light, white, black and tan English setter dog 
(Glow — Lightstone); F. J. Ruhstaller, owner. 

Lad of Kent Jr., black and white pointer dog 

( ); Lansing Tevis, owner; a bye. 

Results. 

First, Shasta Queen; second, Melrose Mac; third 
Lad of Kent. 

o 

NORTHWEST TOURNAMENT. 



The course of the northern team shoots is traced 
from day to day by the press dispatches as follows: 

Eugene, Ore., Jan. 19.— Fred Willet, the crack trap 
shooter of the San Francisco team touring the north- 
west in the American Game Protective and Propaga- 
tion Asociation's tourney, broke all records in the 
competition so far by smashing 100 consecutive clay 
pigeons at the traps of the Eugene Gun Club this 
afternoon. 

Willet was in great form and every target he regis- 
tered was a clean break. He was given a close race 
by Walter W. McCornack of the Eugene Club, who 
made a run of 95 consecutive breaks, but missed his 
ninety-sixth bird and finished with a score of 99. 

McCornack was heartily congratulated by Willet 
and the balance of the professional shoters. As Ike 
Fisher broke 95 the San Francisco team increased 
its lead, despite the fine work of the Portland pair, 
Holohan and Robertson, who broke 189 of their 200 
targets. The Spokane team broke 168 targets. 

All the teams have now shot at 800 targets and 
the scores to date are: 

San Francisco— Willet 379, Fisher 357, total 736. 

Portland— Holohan, 356, Robertson 351, total 707. 

Spokane — Poston 333, Reid 310, total 643. 

The individual scores today were: Willet 100, 
Fisher 95, Holohan 96, Robertson 93, Poston 88, 
Reid 80. 

Salem, Ore., Jan. 20. — The San Francisco team of 
trap shooters made it five straight wins by scoring 
a victory here this afternoon. Pete Holohan of the 
Portland team was high man for the day. He broke 
94 birds, while Fred Willett, hitherto star man of the 
aggregation, was 89, his lowest mark of the tour. 
The teams shoot at Portland tomorrow. Today's 
scores: 

San Francisco— Willet 89, Fisher 89; total, 178. 

Portland— Holohan 94, Robertson 78; total, 172. 

Spokane— Poston 89, Reid 70; total, 159. 

Portland, Ore., Jan. 21. — For the first time since the 
northwestern trap-shooting tournament started at 
Ashland Monday last, the team representing San 
Francisco in the touring contest at clay pigeon shoot- 
ing lost an event, for the Portland team, Holohan and 
Robertson, today defeated Willet and Fisher. 

At the end of the century run Portland was tied 
with the San Francisco shooters with 180 breaks and 
in the shoot off Holohan defeated Willet. Portland 
is now credited with one win against five for San 
Francisco, while the Spokane gunners have yet to 
win a match. The scores today: 

San Francisco— Willet, 92, Fisher 88, total 180. 

Portland— Holohan 94, Robertson 86, total 180. 

Spokane— Poston 86, Reid 80, total 166. 

The team totals to date are: San Francisco 1094, 
Portland 1059. and Spokane 969. 

The teams shoot at Seattle tomorrow, Bellingham 
Tuesday, Snohomish Wednesday, Tacoma Thursday 
and Aberdeen Friday. 

Seattle, Wash., Jan. 22. — By the narrow margin of 
one bird the San Francisco team of trap shooters 



won out in the competition held under the auspices 
of the Seattle Gun Club today. The bay city team 
scored 187 breaks to 186 scored by the Portland rep- 
resentatives. Fred Willet of the winning team, which 
has now won six of the seven matches, was high man 
today, with a score of 97. Pete Holohan of the Port- 
land team scored 94 for the third successive time, 
and was second to Willet. Lester Reid formed a part- 
nership with Hugh Poston as the representatives of 
Spokane, and broke in with a score of 89. The scores 
today: 

San Francisco, 187 — Willet 97, Fisher 90. 

Portland 186— Holohan 94, Robertson 92. 

Spokane 177— Poston 88, Reid 89. 

Bellingham, Wash., Jan. 23. — For the first time 
since the trap shooting tournament started at Ash- 
land last week all three of the competing teams 
broke better than 90 per cent of their targets, which 
occurred here this afternoon under the auspices 
of the Bellingham Gun Club. 

In spite of the good work of the other teams, the 
San Francisco pair, Willet and Fisher, won out again, 
and, as in the Seattle shoot, one target gave them the 
decision. The score was: San Francisco 190, against 
189 for the Spokane duo, Poston and Less Reid, 
who were the runners up for the first time today. 

Hugh Poston of the Spokane team was high man 
for the day, with 96 breaks in his string of 100. He 
missed one target in each of his four strings of 25 
birds. Fred Willet, high man among the tourists, 
again scored a fine average, for he smashed 95 of the 
string, as did his teammate, Ike Fisher. Willet 
missed but two targets in his first 75 birds and lost 
three in his last string. 

San Francisco has now won seven of the eight 
events shot off for the American Game Protective 
and Propagation Association's trophy but the good 
work being done by the other teams at present means 
that Willet and Fisher will have to keep up their 
high averages to retain the lead. The tourists shoot 
at Snohomish tomorrow. 

Snohomish, Wash., Jan. 24.— By a score of 182 for 
the Portland gunners against 179 for the San Fran- 
cisco team the former team of trap shooters, now 
competing in the touring tournament in the North- 
west, was victorious for the second time since the 
tour started in the shoot held under the auspices of 
the Snohomish Rod and Gun Club today. 

The fine wcrk of "Robbie" Robertson in the final 
string of 25 targets, which were shot at during a 
gale of wind and a blinding rainstorm, was the fea- 
ture. Robertson maintained his average score for 
the day, while one man on each of the other teams 
fell down at the finish. The scores were: 

Portland— Holohan 93, Robertson 89; total, 182. 

San Francisco— Willett 94, Fisher 85; total, 179. 

Spokane — Poston 94, Reid S3; total, 177. 

The teams shoot at Tacoma tomorrow and at 
Aberdeen Sunday. 



One of the fastest fields ever gathered in the south 
lined up for Wednesday's opening events in the fifth 
annual midwinter handicap trap shooting tournament 
of the Pinehurst, N. C, Country Club, seventeen of 
the contestants making better than 94 per cent and 
fifteen making straight runs better than 50. 

The sensational feature of the day was a score of 
198, which placed G. S. McCarty of Philadelphia at 
the head of the field with a margin of 6 targets. 
Charles N. Newcomb of Philadelphia finished in sec- 
ond place at 192, bunched in a quadruple tie with 
F. S. Wright of South Wales, N. Y. ; F. A. Hodgman 
of Tyckahoe, N. Y., and W. Y. Laslie of Tuskegee, 
winner of the 1911 southern handicap. 

Lester German of Aberdeen, Md., challenger for 
the world's championship, held by Tex G. L. Lyon 
of Durham, N. C, also a contestant in this tourna- 
ment, headed the professionals, with 195 and a 
straight run of 105. 

"Howdeydew" Rice breezed into town last Tuesday- 
chipper and jovial as ever. A five weeks' visit to 
Eastern points equipped him with conversational 
ammunition — smokeless or black— to keep the Cop- 
per Kettle Club in good humor for a month of Sun- 
days. 



Bob Bungay, a prominent Southern California trap- 
shot, ended a two weeks' sojourn in this city Tues- 
day evening when he left on "The Lark" for Ocean 
Park. 

o 

IN NEW QUARTERS. 



The Ellery Arms Company will next week occupy 
new and commodious quarters at Nos. 583-585 Market 
street — where more than twice the main floor space 
and three times the upper stories room of the loca- 
tion at Nos. 48-50 Geary street will be available. 

This change of location, it is announced, has been 
necssitated by want of room to properly care for a 
onstantly increasing business. 

"The new quarters give us five times as much 
space, and it will all be needed to display what is 
admitted to be the most complete line of sporting 
goods in America." 

o 

Shoshone Rod and Gun Club planted 235,000 black 
spotted trout in northern Idaho last year, and it is 
expected to place as many more in 1912. Early last 
spring the officers placed their mark at 300,000. It 
had been the hope of C. E. Clark, secretary of the 
club, and other members, that they might secure at 
least 150,000 trout fry from the national government 
but only 50,000 were received. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



TWO COMMON FORMS OF COLIC. 



CARE OF BROOD MARES. 



CARING FOR HORSES' FEET. 



Probably the most common form of colic in horses 
is that which is termed spasmodic, or cramp, colic. 
In this form of colic the pain is produced by con- 
traction, or spasm of a portion of the small intes- 
tines. This action may be incited by the ingestion 
of a large amount of cold water when the animal is 
hot or fatigued, by exposure to cold when in the 
same condition, by the presence of indigestible food 
in the intestines, by sudden changes in the diet, or 
even by exhaustion. 

The symptoms diagnostic of this sort of colic are 
suddenness of attack, severity of abdominal pains, 
which are apt to be remittent with intervals of free- 
dom from colic, loudness of intestinal sounds, which 
may be plainly heard by applying the ear over the 
flank, and violence of action, such as throwing them- 
selves down, jumping up, whirling about and striking 
In addition, the history of the case, in many in- 
stances, will assist in a diagnosis. 

Practical treatment for a case of this kind consists 
in administering some anti-spasmodic, in keeping the 
body warmly clothed, and in walking the animal 
gently about. Sometimes in mild cases whisky, given 
four ounces in a pint of hot water, will suffice as the 
anti-spasmodic. In more severe cases two ounces of 
laudanum in a pint of water should be given. When 
convenient, relief may be secured by injecting under 
the skin from two to five ounces of morphine, de- 
pending upon the severity of the case. One grain of 
atrophine is also given. Rectal injections of warm 
water will also aid in giving relief. If the cramp is 
due to the food in the bowels, a physic of one ounce 
of olive or one pint of linseed oil is also indicated. 

A second very common form of colic in the horse 
is that which is known as wind colic or bloat. In 
this form the pain caused by accumulation in 
the stomach and intestines is due to resulting from 
the fermentation of food. Ordinarily, this fermen- 
tation of food in the stomach and intestines is due to 
delayed digestion from such causes as sudden changes 
in diet, food given while the animal is exhausted, 
ingestion of large quantities of green food or food 
actually indigestible. 

The symptoms diagnostic of this form are grad- 
ually of attack, beginning with dullness and being 
followed by uneasiness, distension of the abdomen 
by the accumulating gases, particularly in the large 
intestine, continuous pain, with perhaps a partial 
relief by occasional passing of gas from the bowels, 
and, in severe cases, if relief is not obtained, diffi- 
cult breathing, staggering from side to side, and, 
finally, plunging forward dead. 

Treatment for this form of colic depends mate- 
rially upon the severity of the case at hand. In mild 
cases the administering of intestinal antiseptics and 
absorbents, together with a physic, will, in all prob- 
ability, suffice for complete relief. A good combina- 
tion of these three agents is turpentine one ounce, 
and linseed oil one pint. In very severe cases, how- 
ever, in addition to the above treatment and perhaps 
the use of an anti-spasmodic, the one essential con- 
sists in puncturing the bowel to allow the escape of 
gases. The point of puncture, ordinarily, should be 
made on the right side in the hollow made by the 
last rib, back bone, and hip joint, but in case the 
seat of greatest distension is on the left side, or if 
that side is uppermost with the patient lying down, 
the puncture may be made on that side at the point 
of greatest distension. 

Too much cannot be said in regard to the import- 
ance of using careful asepsis in making the puncture. 
If the pressing need of relief will at all permit, time 
should be taken for clipping the hair from the point 
of puncture, for painting the skin about it with 
tincture of iodine, and for boiling the instruments to 
be used or cleansing them with some good antiseptic. 
The skin should then be incised with a knife and the 
puncture made with a trocar and canula. For the 
best of asepsis the wound should be sealed with 
collodion just as soon as the gas has escaped. — G. T. 
Lipp. ■ o 

It seems strange after all which has been written 
duriDg the past thirty-six years on the subject of 
breeding fast trotters, that Sidney Dillon 23157 is the 
only stallion that has yet begotten, in one season, 
two trotters with race records so fast as 2:06% to 
wagon and 2:07% to harness made in races that they 
won. These trotters were Dolly Dillon (w) 2:06%, 
and Stanley Dillon 2:07%. It is a singular fact that 
Sidney Dillon 23157 got these two noted trotters 
when he was but two years old, and it is still more 
remarkable that he has not begotten two so fast, 
trotters in any one season since he was two years 
old. Another curious fact is that both Dolly Dillon 
(w) 2:06% and Stanley Dillon 2:07% were from 
mares that had never been raced to standard records. 
These facts furnish food for thought.— Horse Breeder. 



Thos. W. Lawson speaking as an enthusiastic 
breeder of both, the auto and the nag, and as one 
who, in quest of the ideal nick, has crossed the limou- 
sine with Dobbin, and Dobbin's sister with the long 
hung racer, and who has in the paddock many quar- 
ter, half and three-quarter breds; and speaking as 
one who appreciates all the good points of each and 
knows all the mean ones, said I would say straight 
from the heart, I'd rather own a couple of shares 
of non-dividend-paying Hackney Common, or a share 
of ex-dividend Kentucky Preferred, or even a passed- 
coupon Irish Timber Topper Debenture than a gar- 
age of 1912 sixes. 'Pon my soul, I would. Experience 
has taught me that while the auto is a bully good 
chum for one's get-there moods, the pal for a man 
to throb to and sob to, laugh to and quaff to, Is his 
horse — of course, I mean next to his wife, sweet- 
heart or — dog. 



Brood mares should have extra care from now 
until the time of foaling. Moderate exercise upon 
the road will be much better for them than standing 
in a stall. Feed upon the best of hay and sound, 
clean sweet oats. Musty hay and injured oats are 
liable to cause slipping of foals. It is better lor both 
mare and foal that the former does not take on too 
much flesh. As a rule foals from very fat mares are 
much more puny at birth than those from strong, 
hearty ones in only fair condition. 

Moderate exercise upon the road or farm is much 
better for brood mares than standing in stalls day 
after day. Such as are not exercised by work of 
some kind should have a few hours' run in an open 
yard when the weather is suitable. It will be neces- 
sary to look after them some then, for many preg- 
nant mares are inclined to stand still when out of 
doors. 

There are a few things which those who have the 
care of brood mares should be careful to avoid. One 
is permitting them to drink too heartily of cold 
water. When salt is kept constantly in their man- 
gers, and they are watered three times a day, there 
is not much danger. When they are salted only once 
a week, and perhaps not so often, the danger is 
increased. Probably there are more foals killed 
prematurely in the north during the winter months 
from this than from any other single cause. Very 
lew farmers are aware of this fact, however. 

Another frequent case is turning the mare short 
about, either in or out of harness. Do not allow any 
one, especially a heavy man, on the back of a mare 
which is carrying a foal. 

In some localities, mares are compelled to drink 
from brooks or springs, and when the snow is deep 
it is very difficult lor them to reach the water. 
Under these conditions, mares are liable to become 
strained to such an extent as to cause abortion. 
Keep the mares away from fresh blood. Do not allow 
them to come near fresh pelts of sheep or hides that 
have been taken from cattle. Some object to having 
brood mares groomed. If the man who handles the 
comb and brush is careful, there is little danger of 
injury from grooming. Animals which are not 
groomed are more liable to roll in the yard than 
those which are carefully brushed every day. 

There is generally more danger from rolling than 
from grooming. If there are no stones or other hard 
substances on the ground for the animal to roll upon 
there is not much to be feared from rolling. There 
may be some danger of displacement of foal, how- 
ever, which will be apt to result in unnatural pre- 
sentation at birth. Some mares, even when heavy 
in foal, will roll eyery day if they can get a chance, 
yet never slip their foals prematurely and never 
have any difficulty in delivering them. 

o 

TO GET RID OF WARTS. 

Warts on horses may be removed in various ways, 
the method chosen depending upon the size, form 
and situation of the wart. Small warts or those 
with a well marked neck are most easily removed 
with the scissors, and the cut surface should be thor- 
oughly cauterized with lunar caustic, sulphate of 
copper or zinc (one part of the sulphate to four 
parts of lard) or other caustic. In some cases con- 
siderable bleeding may follow the cutting, but the 
caustic may soon check the flow of blood. Another 
method is to tie a strong linen thread or small cord 
tightly around the neck of the wart, close to the 
skin, and tighten the cord daily until the wart drops 
off. Burning off with the hot iron is also very 
effectual. Flat warts or those that cannot be easily 
removed by a simpler method may be gradually 
eaten out or killed with strong caustics. If near 
the eyes use nitrate of silver or other stick caustics. 
In other situations a more powerful caustic may be 
used, as nitric or nitro-muriatic acid, applied with a 
small swab or the bruised end of a soft wood stick, 
and well rubbed into the wart two or three times a 
week until killed. In using these powerful liquid 
caustics care must be taken that the caustic does 
not spread to the adjacent skin and produce an 
unnecessary sore. 

o — — 

TRANSFERRED TO JOHN F. BOYD. 

Deeds were placed on record last Monday at Mar- 
tinez transferring the Oakwood Park Stock Farm, 
near Danville, one of the most famous properties in 
Contra Costa county, from Lena Humphrey and her 
husband, William Humphrey, to John F. Boyd. The 
Oakwood farm is one of the few big ranches remain- 
ing in the San Ramon valley. Boyd bid in the prop- 
erty more than a year ago at a foreclosure sale under 
his mortgage for $175,000. The owners having failed 
to redeem. Boyd came into possession of the property. 
The tract comprises nearly 5,000 acres. At one 
time it was improved with fine barns, club houses, a 
race track. 

LEADING BROODMARE SIRES. 

Following is a list of sires whose daughters have 
produced 100 or more standard performers: 

Nutwood 37H Alcantara 156 

Red Wilkes 281 Dictator 142 

Onward 270 Almont 13fi 

Strathmore 222 Harold 130 

Ceorge Wilkes 210 Kv, Prince 137 

Robt. McGregor 210 r.amlietta Wilkes 132 

nine Bull 181 Hambletonlan lis 

Kloctloneer 179 Chimes 123 

Mambrtno King 17R Daniel Lamberl Tin 

Maron Wilkes 185 Haml.rlno 117 

Mambrlno Pntcben ,J.165 Prlnceps 108 

Happy Medium 1">7 Wilkes Boy Ill 

lielmont 151 • 



Although the feet form only a small portion of the 
horse's anatomy, no other part will respond more 
readily and profitably to care and attention, or be 
more liable to suffer serious injury or derangement 
without proper care, says an exchange. If, under 
natural conditions, we might assume that the feet 
would need no care, but generally conditions are 
so far from natural that any such assumption would 
be foolish and costly. A horse's feet and legs deter- 
mine to a large extent his value, and since they 
are more liable to unsoundness, due to injury or 
disease, than any other part of the body, it is dou- 
bly important that special atteution be given them. 
The serious result of uneven growth of the hoof 
lies in the fact that undue strain is placed on cer- 
tain parts of the legs, which in turn may lead to 
some common malformations, such as knock-kneed, 
bow-legged and pigeon-toed. 

In order to properly judge the condition of a 
horse's foot, the appearance of a sound and healthy 
foot should be kept in mind. The wall of the hoof 
should be of dense, heavy fibres, straight from the 
coronet to the ground, and the surface with a fine, 
oily or polished appearance, with no cracks, cliffs, 
or appreciable ridges; frog well developed and of 
a compact, springy texture, with the middle cleft 
broad and shallow, buttresses wide apart, not touch- 
ing the frog, with the bars strong and extending 
straight toward the point of the frog; the space 
between the bars and the frog wide and shallow; 
the heel bulbs full, round and of equal size. View- 
ing from the side, the front wall should be a pro- 
longation of the line of the front of the pastern; 
the ideal slant is one forming an angle of 48 de- 
grees with the ground. Looking from in front, the 
hoof should set squarely on the ground, and a line 
through the center of the hoof be a continuation 
of a line through the center of the knee and the pas- 
tern joint. 

Since we are dealing with the horse's feet on the 
farm, the care of the colt's feet will naturally be the 
first consideration. The wall of the foot grows at 
the rate of about one-third of an inch per month. 
When the colt is on pasture where there is stone 
or gravel in the soil, the horn will wear off as fast 
as is necessary, but unless judiciously directed the 
wearing will be uneven. On fine soils the growth 
exceeds the wearing. Under such conditions, with- 
out proper care the hoof grows out, loses its shape 
and the horn splits, cracks or breaks off, leaving 
the foot unbalanced and possibly in such shape as to 
throw the entire bony column of the leg out of line 
and lead to a permanent alteration in the form of 
the limb. The best plan to follow is to examine 
' the colt's i< et once every four to six weeks. Us- 
ually, if the toe is shortened and the sides rounded 
off to prevent clipping, the rest of the foot will take 
care of itself. The frog and sole should be let abso- 
lutely alone; nature will take ample care of them 
in so far as getting rid of excessive growth is con- 
cerned, when on pasture. 

o 

VETERINARY. 

F. W. P. — (1) I have a mare that has a bunch on the 
offside of jaw, like an egg, and at the underside of 
jaw there is a small opening which drips, not matter, 
but more like water. The veterinary says the gland 
that empties into the mouth at the molars is stopped, 
but he does not know what to do. Now, if you know, 
let me hear through your Breeder and Sportsman. 
She has not been out of pasture before for three 
years. (2) What is good to give colts for worms. 

Answer — (1) The lump is probably a calculus, 
which has formed in the duct or passage from the 
gland, and the fluid is the saliva coming from same 
gland, and which should enter the mouth. Get a 
veterinarian to cut down on, and remove the calculus 
or lump. Also to cut the edges of the opening from 
which the fluid drips; then let him make an opening 
from the same duct, into the mouth, and after com- 
pleting the operation, to stitch up the whole outside 
wound, and cover with an antiseptic dressing. (2) 
There are many preparations for worms in horses, 
sold by veterinarians, and without knowing age, and 
constitution of the colt, we would not like to advise 
any special one. The veterinarian who operates on 
the mare can advise you when he sees the condition 
of the colt. 

o 

Although they are generally considered an unde- 
sirable feature, there is not much to object to in 
coarse hocks, for hock joints of this kind are usually 
of large size, and that is a valuable attribute. The 
term "curby hocks," which is frequently used, has a 
rather indefinite meaning, though it is mostly ap- 
plied to hocks in which the rear outline is not quite 
straight (viewing the joint in profile), but somewhat 
curved outward, giving the idea of the curb. It is 
often said that curby hocks are more than ordinarily 
liable to spring a curb, and they are objected to for 
that reason, but as often one finds such hock joints 
to be quite as strong as, and no more predisposed 
to contract unsoundness, than more normally shaped 
ones. Still, the fact of a horse being curby-hocked 
must be looked upon as a disadvantage. Sometimes 
the opposite kind of formation is seen— the hock, 
looked at sideways, showing a more or less concave 
outline behind. That is practically always an indi- 
cation that the joint is weak, and this feature is to 
bo strongly objected to. 



A large force of men i* fencing the new race 
track at Los Angeles and, judging by the rapidity 
they are working, it will not be long before the 
work will be accomplished. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



"THE BEST WAY TO CURE PORK." 

Professor H. S. Mobley, Fayette- 
ville, Ark., has used for years a sys- 
tem ot curing meat that has been fol- 
lowed with success in his family in 
Virginia from generation to genera- 
tion since colonial days. It has been 
tested by hundreds of people in many 
Southern states and every one has 
found it more reliable for home curing 
than any other method. Professor 
Mobley furnished his method to the 
agricultural department of the Rock 
Island lines for distribution. 

A day should be selected for killing: 
when the temperature is low enough 
to insure a thorough cooling by the 
following morning, the hogs being 
dressed and hung over night. 

On the morning of the day the hogs 
are killed, for each 400 pounds of 
meat make a brine, as follows: 20 gal- 
lons of rain water, 30 pounds of salt, 
S ounces of baking soda, 10 pounds of 
brown sugar, 1 gallon of molasses 
(use good molasses, not the adulter- 
ated kind.) This fluid should be boiled 
and skimmed in the morning and left 
to cool in a shady place. When cool 



Show 



Horse! 

Race Horse!! 



Sire!!! 



The Standard Trotting Stallion 

LIJERO 2:15i «»ho.«« 

Sired by James Madison 2:17% (son 
of Anteeo 2:16%). sire of 18 in 2:30 list, 
including Brilliant 2:08>/a. Tuna 8:0*%, 
Kmily W. 2:10; dam Hilda (dam of \\ 11- 
liam Albert 2:16%. a sire, Saint Am- 
brose 2:25, and Ujero 2:15%, a sire), by 
Nutwood 2:18%, the world's champion 
broodmare sire; second dam Eudora by 
Volunteer, the greatest sire of race 
horses that ever lived; third dam by 
American Star 14, the sire whose 
daughters have produced 43 trotters 
and among them some of our greatest 

8 "Lijero is a brown stallion foaled in 
1902. stands 16.1, and weighs 1200 
pounds. He sired Hxpedio (3) 2:14Vi. 
Public trial at Chico as a four-year-old 
in 2:08%. Ujero forced Prince Lot 
2:09% to trot in 2:10% at "Woodland in 
1910 and was only beaten a head. He 
started in five races, won three and was 
second in the other two, and it gave 
Helen Stiles 2:08% and Prince Lot 2:09% 
all thev could do to beat him in those 
two races. Very few horses have ever 
trotted in 2:10 with less work than 
Lijero. He should race in 2:08 this 
year. He has everything to recommend 
him as a game racehorse and as a sire 
he will undoubtedly be one of the best. 
He has size, style, color, conformation, 
disposition, the best of feet and legs, 
an iron constitution, and the purest 
of trotting action. His gameness is 
unquestioned. He is a perfect show 
horse and sires show horses. He and 
his daughter Expedio have won first 
prizes 1" the standard class at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair. 

IDORA W., registered in Vol. XIX, 
Brown mare. 15.2 hands; foaled 1901. 
Sired by James Madison 2:17%, dam 
Swift Tide by Albert W. 2:20; second 
dam Uarda (dam of Flowing Tide 
2:14%), by Echo; third dam Dewdrop. 
A sure breeder, due to foal to Lijero 
1912. Entered in State Futurity and 
Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

TOOTS W., registered, Vol. XIX. Bay 
mare. 15.2 hands; foaled 1907 by Stam 
B. 2:11%, dam Idora W. Due to foal 
to Lijero 1912. This mare is very fast, 
having worked quarters in 35 seconds 
as a two-year-old. Entered in State 
Fair Futurity and Breeders' Futurity 
Stakes. 

JAMES H. DONNELLEY, b. g., 15.3 
hands; foaled 1909. Sired by Lijero 
2:15%, dam by Hanford Medium; second 
dam Algerine (dam of Kelly Briggs 
2:08). by Algona, etc. Entered in Breed- 
ers' Futurity and State Fair Futurity. 
With little work this one showed a 
mile in 1911 in 2:28. half In 1:10 and a 
quarter in 33% seconds. He will make 
a 2:12 or better pacer this year. 

IVA W., b. f.. foaled 1910; sired by 
Prince Ansel 2:20%; dam Idora W. 
(which see). Entered in Breeders' 
Futurity, State Fair Futurity and Oc- 
cident Stake. She is just broken to 
drive and will undoubtedly make a very 
fast mare. She is eligible for registra- 
tion. 

UK. JOHN, b. c. (1). by Palite (son of 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% and Palita, 2, 
2:16); dam Toots W. (which see). En- 
tered in State Fair Futurity, Breeders' 
Futurity and Occident Stake. A fine 
large perfectlv formed individual, nice- 
ly halter broken. 

These horses are all sound and In 
good condition, ready for anything that 
horses can be used for. The mare 
Toots W., if worked, will make a 2:12 
trotter, or even a lower record than 
this. 

On account of the many demands up- 
on my time In my business, I find I 
cannot devote any to the development 
or care of these, therefore I have de- 
cided to sell them. 

Any further information regarding 
prices, etc., will be given by addressing 
P. E. WRIGHT, 
318 K. St., Sacramento, Cal. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HITMAN BEMKDT for Bheu- 
mntlim, Nprulni, Sore Throat, ets., it 

Is Invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balaam sold Is 
Warranted to pive satisfaction. Price 
per bottle. Solil by drucjrists. or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE UWREXCE- WILLIAMS COMPANY, CltveUnd, Ohj« 



add E ounces of saltpeter. Dissolve 
the saltpeter in warm water and stir 
thoroughly. 

The following morning cut up the 
hogs, as usual, and pack in barrels. 
Put the sides of the meat or middlings 
in the bottom and the shoulders next, 
and the hams on top of these, all 
with the skin side down. 

Weight the meat down well and 
pour the brine over until the meat is 
completely covered. Then cover the 
top of the barrel with some good, 
thick covering that will prevent evap- 
oration. 

Look at the meat often enough to 
see that the brine has not evaporated 
so as to leave any meat exposed. If 
it should become exposed more brine 
should be added. The meat can be 
left in the brine indefinitely, but if 
it is desired to smoke the meat, it 
should be taken out in about six 
weeks. 

If our Southern farmers will use 
this method and cure their own meat 
at home they will save a neat sum 
each year. 

If it has been your custom to put 
up the supply of family meat by cur- 
ing with dry salt, and do not care to 
risk all of it by another method, then 
try a barrel or two, using the above 
plan, and compare the results. 




Kendall's Spavin Cnre Is the old reli- 
able. Sti/e remedy for all cases of spavin, 
splint, curb, ringbone, bony (crow tb and lame- 
ness from other causes, ft keeps the horses 
working— not loafing. What It has done for 
others It will do for you. Keep a bottle of 

Kendall's Spavin Cure 

handy so you can uselt quickly when the need 
arises. A one dollar bottle may save a horse 
for you. It's worth while to be ready. Ask 
your druggist the next time you are In town. 
Tear this advertisement out to remind you. 

Sold by druggists everywhere. Si. 00 a bottle; 
6 for Sfi.OO. Keep It In the house for family use, 
as well as In the stable. Get a copy of "A 
Treatise on the Horse'' at your druggists 
or write to 

DR. B. J. KENDALL COMPANY, 
Enosburg Falls, Vt. 



THE 20™ CENTURY 

GUN OIL 



buy. Cleans out the barrel*. Espe- 
cially good when smokeless powder 
Is used. Oils the mechanisms, 
polishes the stock, and positively 
prevents rust on the metal in any 
climate and any kind of weather. 
Use before and after shooting. 

3-In-Oil Co.. 
102 New St., New York C ty 



No 

matter 
how long 
yourhorsehas 
een lame, or 
what the nature 
his lameness, you 
can cure him if you 
use Mack's $ 1 000 Spavin 
Remedy. 

This is the Only Spavin 
Remedy that Is Sold Under a 
$1 ,000 Bond Guaranteeing a Cure 
or the Return of Your Money. 

Every Owner, Trainer, or Caretaker 

hould keep this remedy constantly at hand and 
use it freely whenever there is any si<;n or indica- 
i of lameness. 

*•> Mack's $1,000 Spavin Remedy Will Quickly Cure 
avin, Ringbone, Thoroughpin, Curb, Capped Hock, 
Shoeboil, Sprung Knee, Ruptured Tendons, Sweeny, 

sr any one of a hundred different causes of lameness from which 
your horse may be suffering. ( . 

MACK'S $1,000 SPAVIN CURE 

Relieves Cases Formerly Considere d Incurable 

Wc know of many cases where horse owners have paid out b\e fees and had valuable horses tortured with 
"firine." "blisierine," and other eoud-for-nothine methods, and as a last resort tried Mack's $1,000 
>avin Remedy, and were amazed at the painless, positive, quick and permanent cure. It does DOt leave any 
blemish or loss of liaii — absolutely no mark to show that the animal has ever been lame. Saf? to use on any 
horse, old or younu. It's the surest remedy money can buy, . 
and it's the only Spavin remedy in the world that is absolutely 




guaranteed by a 

$1,000 WARRANTY BOND 

This is a straightforward business proposition that you can 
not overlook if you have a lame horse. Nut only for the sake of 
the horse, but for your pocket-book as well, yon should read 
every word of this advertisement and then send the coupon with- 
out the loss of an hour. Don't let your horse suffer, don't sell 
him for a few dollars; ask us to tell you how to remove the lame- 
ness safely, surely and quickly. 

We will send you THE BEST AND MOST RELI- 
ABLE DIAGNOSIS ABSOLUTELY FREE. 

All you have to do is to fill out the " Free Diagnosis 
Coupon." mark just where your horse has a swelling, sore or 
any one of the big number of possible causes for lameness, and 
send it to us. We will then eive the coupon to our practicing 
Veterinary Specialist for his expert diagnosis. This diagnosis is 
invariably correct. Wc then inform you of the cause of your 
horse's lameness and the remedy that will absolutely cure 
him. We do all this for nothing. 

Be Positive, Know What You Are Doing and know 
that you are treating the right spot in the right way. Don't dis- 
figure your horse and reduce his market value. Write to us. 

Y our Druggist Will Obtain Mack's 

$1,000 Spavin Remedy for You 



If you ii*k him, Piice$Y00 per bottle, 
to us and we will see that your order ie 
No matter where, when or fro 
• 1,000 Spavin Remedy, the price 
nteed, and is accompanied I y 



If he refuses, remit $5.00 
filled without delay, 
i whom you buy Mack's 
- tho name. Every liottlo is 
•ur $1,111)0 Warranty Bond, 
which insures you that your money will t>e refunded if tho remedy 
fails to do all we claim for it, as stated in our guaranty. 

Do wrti accept a substitute, for there is no other remedy like 
Mack's •>.. *00 Spavin Remedy— nothing so powerful and sure to 
cure. It si. udt supreme as a remedy in all furnis of lameness. 

McKALLOR DRUG CO. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 



FREE DIAGNOSIS COUPON 



On plM 
of horse 
nark with 

■n X just 
whero Awe 
Ingor 1 

ness occurs, 
then clip out 
coupon and 
mail to us with 
a letter, telling 
what caused 
tho la n tenets, 
how long bursa 
i been lamo, 
how it affects 

ago of 

horse, etc. 

We will tell you Just what tho lameness island how to 
relievi it quickly. Absolutely no charge. Write today. 

free Book-"Horsc Sense'' 

Send us the Free Diagnosis Coupon, get abso- 
lutely free a copy of our book ''Horse-Sense. 
Describes and Illustrates diseases of horses' 
limbs, shows correct name for every part of 
horse and tells valuable facta every burse 
owner ought to know. 




SAVE-THE-HORSE 

REGISTERED U. S. PATENT OFFICE. 

i I<» WatdschmiJt 's 





RAVE-TflE-IIORSE BOOK la an encyclopedia of 
Information. • Covers every scope and character of 
lameness. MAILED WITHOUT <_ 1IAKGE. 
f Write for letters from breeders, business men and 
bankers the world over on every kind of case. 

You will then understand why we Rive an Ironclad 
contract to cure or refund money. This contract has 
1 180,000 paid up capital back of it to secure and make its 
promise good. Send for copy. 

BUNKER-CULLER LUMBER COMPANY. 
Capital Paid Up $850,000. 
BTJWKTR, MISSOURI, Oct. 14, 1911.— Troy Chemical Co., 
BinrhsmtOD, N. Y. — Having tried Ssve-The- Horse to our satis- 
faction on s bog spavin, we base called in another mule with 
• bog. Send another bottle ; enclose IS. 00. 

BUNKER-CULLER LUMBER CO. S. J. BUNKER, President. 



^Practical ^{orseshoers .Carrtao* and Wagom Work, 
695 South 3>.l~t Strt.l Culumbu: Ohio. 
Oct. 27. 1911— Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, K. T. H joo 
remember, in March, 1910. 1 wmto regards my hay mare haying 
shad bona apayin. Had her fired with no remits (so lameahs 
couldn't walk): decided to ueo Save-The-Horae. I did ao sod 
aioca my mare haabeon sound. Now I gave her all this time to go 
wrongagsin. So you may uae this later. I think Saie-Thi-Horae 
Is the greatest remedy io the world. J. L. WALDSCHMIDT, J a. 

mmm s bottle, with s contract to absolutely snd perms- 
alkali^ nentlycurs laaa aad Bog Spavin, Thoronghpin, ■la.sBtc 
■-.■pi low). Cark. Sphel, Capped Hoeb. WiodpaH. 
Sbea ieil. Ie|ared faasjasa aad all laaiaaasa ar •ENIM) ln£ sJOSET. 
Ho acar or loaa of hair. Boras worka as usual. , 

35 at all Draifisfs ar Dsalara ar Eiprasa Paid II. 1. aad Caaada. 
IBOICUEBU'AL CO., Commercial Ass., BtagkaaetSB,I.t> 

N, Y. 



TROY CHEMICAL CO., BINGHAMTON, 
D. IS. NEWELL, 

66 Bayo Vlnta Avenue, Oaklnnd, Col. 251 Kear-y Street, San Frnnclnco, Cal. 




WM, HAROLD 2:13 



•| By Sidney 2:19 , 
. Dam 
4 Cricket 2:10 



Sire of Frank N. 2:0"K. Janice 2:0SK. The Iceman 2:10. etc. 
Season 1912. $5 at first service: $20 when mare proves 
with foal. 

Apply or address 

JA8. D. JOHNSTONE, 

Elmhurst. Alameda Co., Cal. 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1? 



*soo^ottossxx%x%sxx%sxxx%^ xxxsxxxssxxsycKsxxxxxxxsxy 

AN UNBEATEN RECORD! 



TARGETS SHOT AT 
4280 



97.28 per cent 



TARGETS BROKEN 
4164 



This is the percentage with which Mr. J. S. Day won the 1910 OFFICIAL HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE — a percentage never 

equaled by an amateur and exceeding by exactly 1 per cent the figures of the 1911 winner, who, moreover, shot at only 2100 targets. 

Mr. Day's wonderful shooting was done with 




FACTORY LOADED SHELLS 



The Lion's Share of the 1911 Amateur Honors 

Was also won with PETERS SHELLS, for they were used either exclusively or for the most of their shooting, hy 5 out of the 10 High Amateurs. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. EiHSHHsH^ 



Last Call 



—OF— 



$S7 



FOR A 




JERALD SULKY 



any size or color, fitted with Hartford Bolted tires, straight spoke wheels, twelve 
ounce shipping cover made of canvas, weight pocket cushion, pump, wrench and 
oil can. If full cash accompanies order, price $54.15. 

Mail your order at once, before February 1st, to take advantage of this splendid 
offer. $10 to accompany order, balance on delivery of sulky. We will hold sulky 
until May 1st (delivery) if desired. 

You Can't Make a Mistake— Nothing Better at Any Price! 

Address S. E. JERALD SULKY CO., Waterloo, Iowa, U. S. A. 



FOR SALE— Electeur Jr. 

A Ine /oung- Percheron Stallion, six 

years old next April. Weighs 2400 
pounds. He was sired by Electeur, 
'Imported from France in 1904, sired 
_6y Valtaique 25159; dam, Sultane 
43394; second dam, Biche 17881; third 
dam, Pelotte 1850. Electeur Jr. is 
solid black in color, well formed in 
every respect and is a sure foal getter. 
His dam is hy Uptumus, he by Duke 
-of de Charters, the most celebrated 
horse in the United States. No finer 
Percheron Stallion is in the State. Can 
be seen at the McCarty Ranch, 4% 
miles northeast of Suisun. Price very 
reasonable. ED. Met ARTY, Owner, 
Suisun, C'al. 




THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Of San Francisco 



CAPITAL 

$3,000,000.00. 
SURPLUS AND PROFITS 
$1,500,000.00. 



c 



mm 



Rudolph Spreekels, Pres. 
James K. Lynch. Vice- Pres. 
J. K. Moffitt. Cashier. 



Offers adequate banking 
service to mercantile firms, 
business men, professional 
men and banks. 



Post and Montgomery 



J. n. Skinner, Assistant-Cashier 

C. H. McCormick. " 
Geo. A. Kennedy. 



hrit He Worth Saving ? x 

\_ ^ Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good 

horse just because he "goes lame, "throws a 
' curb" or develops some other blemishf There 
is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curbs, Splinta. 
Windpuffs or Bunches which will not yield 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

QUINN'S 

*< OINTMENT. 

Dr. K. II. Davenport, a prominent physician or Sheridan , Ind., 
writes: I have u^ed a number of remedies for the removnl or 
curbn, Kplfnts, thickened tendons and ItftsufH (fenerally. but for 
the last two years I have not been without Qulnn's ointment. I have tented It thor- 
oughly at divert nt time*, and pay without henftancy th <t It is the only reliable reme- 
dy of tho kind 1 have ever tried.' r Price 91 .00 per bottle. 8 »id by all di urftdst* of . 

W. B, Eddy & Co.. Whitehall . N.Y. 




RED COCKERS FOR SALE-Handsome 

pedigreed bitch. 3 years old. and a 5 months' old 
Puppy. A bargain. For particulars address 
George Van Horn. Redwood City. Phone, 285 Y. 



STUD BOOK FOR SALE. — Volumes 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Bruce's American Stud 
Book; handsomely bound: good as new. 
Will be sold cheap. Address Breeder 
«tn<l Sportsman, Snn Frnnelseo, Cal. 



FOR SALE. — I'erclieron Stallion 

(grade, 4 years old, bay, absolutely 
sound, good disposition, and sure foal 
getter; weighs 1800 pounds. I have 
seven of his weanlings to show how he 
breeds. Price $1000. For further par- 
ticulars address J. E. MONTGOMERY, 
Davis, Cal. 



FOR SALE. — Handsome seal brown 
stallion, 6 years old, weighs 1200 
pounds. Has paced a quarter in 30 
seconds. He is an inbred Electioneer 
and is a sure foal getter. Purchaser 
can see his colts. Also black Perc- 
heron stallion. 9 years old, weighs 
1700 pounds. Handsome and sure foal 
getter. The above horses will be sold 
cheap. For price and particulars, ap- 
ply to Conlon Bros. Ranch, San Pablo 
Ave., near County Line. Postoffice ad- 
dress, R. F. D. 1, Berkeley, Cal. 



FOR SALE — Halley Wilkes, black 
mare by Count Wilkes 2:21; dam by 
Orator, grandson of Electioneer. An 
ideal road mare, trots good road gait; 
paces when at speed, free legged; uses 
no boots. With one month's training 
paced quarter mile in 34% seconds, 
half mile in 1:12 on half-mile track. 
Also three and four-year-old fillies out 
of the same mare by Dictatus 2:17. For 
price and particulars address W. S. 
CLARK, Gustine Stock Farm, Gustine, 
Cal. 



FOR SALE. — A jet black stallion; was 
three years old December 20, 1911. A 
toppy, handsome pacer, nicely gaited, 
good size, and the making of a race 
horse. Has had so little training that 
it is almost none and stepped a quarter 
in 34 seconds. Being as two of us own 
him, must be sold. He is by Zolock 
2 : 5 '4 ; first dam* Angie Duryea (p.) 
2:17%, by Patchen Wilkes (the sire of 
Joe Patchen and others); second dam, 
Angie D. (p.) 2:07 (the first mare to 
pace in 2:07), by Mikaban 2:19, the sire 
of Frank Agan 2:03%. If you desire 
such a horse, write to DR. A. C. HUM- 
ELBAUGH, South Spring Street, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



FOR SALE OR LEASE 



The Standard-Bred Trotting Stallion 

UNIMAK 40936 

(Full brother to Sterling McKinney 
2:06%.) 

Sired by McKinney 2:11%, dam 
Twenty-third hy Director 2:17; second 
dam Nettie Nutwood (dam of Hills- 
dale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%; third 
dam by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903; fourth 
dam by Williamson's Belmont. 

Unlmak is a beautiful seal brown; 
stands 16.1 hands, and weighs 1250. He 
is one of the finest-looking, best-bred 
and best-gaited trotters on this Coast. 
His disposition Is perfect. For terms 
and other information, apply to this 
office. 



BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

J. S. Phippon 

Is now located on the A. J. Clunle 
farm, adjacent to the celebrated Palo 
Alto Farm, at Mayfleld, where he is 
prepared to keep a few horses through 
the winter. He has fine box stalls and 
paddocks and can take the best of 
care of all sent him. He Is also pre- 
pared to break colts either for city 
use or racetrack. His lifelong expe- 
rience In this branch of the business 
has fitted him to do this work care- 
fully and well. He takes pleasure In 
referring to all for whom he has ever 
worked. Address J. S. I'HIITKN, May- 
Dcld, Cal. 



SPECIAL ADVERTISING. 



Wanted, For Sale, and Miscellaneous advertis- 
ing under this head will be set in nonpareil 
type (same type below) and will be published at 
the rate of 2 cents per word each insertion, or 6 
cents per word by the month. Count each abbre- 
viation and initial as a word. 



FOR SALE.— The trotting stallion 
Altitude 2:22; seal brown; fine indiv- 
idual; sound and gentle. For terms, 
etc., address CHAS. THOMPSON", H. V. 
R. D. No. 3, Bakersflelil, Cal. 



FOR SALE.— Out of Rand's famous 
Mile High Kennels; Airedale puppies; 
Boston, French and English bulldogs; 
all of the bfcst pedigreed stock in 
America. For further particulars 
call on L. F. Rains, «7« Monadnock 
Bldg., San Francisco. Phone Sutter 854. 



FOR SALE, CHEAP-The best bred mare 
in California. Bay filly, 3 years old; sound. 
With 6 weeks' work paced a mile in 2:20 to a 
cart and had just 2:00 speed. Sired by Nutwood 
Wilkes; Ht dam by Bonnie Direct 2-0f>%; 2nd 
dam by Searchlight 2 :03J4 ; 3rd dam by Director : 
4th dam Lida W„ dam of Nutwood Wilkes by 
Nutwood GOO. Bred by Martin Carter, Nutwood 
Stock Farm. Address T. W. BARSTOW 1042 
Alameda Ave., San Jose. Cal. 

FOR SALE, CHEAP— One registered 
stallion, sired by McKinney 2:11%; 8 
years old; sound. Also one imported 
draft registered stallion; weight 1800 
pounds; 7 years old. Would consider 
trade on heavy mare or standard-bred 
mares, or fillies. Breeding and pictures 
sent to interested parties. Address D. 
A. BAKER, Hill P. O., San Diego, Cnl. 



FOB S ALE— ZOBLACK 2:1S, pacing 
as a two-year-old; trotting 2:24% as a 
three-year-old; trial 2:19. He Is a coal 
black stallion, five years old, stands 15.3 
hands, weighs 120», and one of the best 
made stallions in California. He should 
get a record of 2:12 or better this year. 
Is kind and Rentlc and is a half brother 
to the great trotter Zomblack 2:26%, 
that worked last fall in 2:08% for his 
owner, R. J. MacKenzle. and will be on 
the circuit this season. Zoblack is a 
standard and registered horse, his pa- 
pers having just been sent for. He was 
sired by Zolock 2:05% (one of the best 
speed producing sons of McKinney 
2:11%) and his dam is Madeleine Mar- 
shall hy Demonio 2:11, second dam that 
great broodmare Mamie Comet 2:23% 
hy Nutwood 2:18%. He will be sold at 
a reasonable figure as the farm I have 
leased has been sold and I am com- 
pelled to get a new place. This Is mv 
only reason for selling Zoblack and the 
following: 

TWENTY-THREE skiddoo, stand- 
ard and registered black mare, foaled 
1906, sired by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, 
dam Twenty-Third (dam of Sterling 
McKinney 2:06%) by Director 2:17. sec- 
ond dam Nettle Nutwood (dam of Hills- 
dale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%, third dam 
by Vick's Ethan Allen Jr.. fourth dam 
hy Williamson's Belmont. This mare 
is a fine sized, well made trotter, gen- 
tle, but has never be. u worked for 
speed. She Is bred to be as fast as any. 

STAB POINTER, filiv (4). n U 1 ot Tri* 
(dam of Aerolite 2:07%. Mona Wilkes 
2:03% and four others) by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16%. etc. This Is a nice big 
mare, stands 15.3 hands and Is a free- 
legped pacer, was handled a little as a 
two and three-year-old. She was both- 
ered with splints, so I did not work her. 
They have disappeared, and, as slio 
never gave a lame step, they must 
never have been near a cord or tendon. 
From her breeding she should make one 
of the greatest of broodmares. 

Dan loicmi Ally (3) out of the stand- 
ard and registered mare Sophia (dam 
of Sophia Direct, p. 2:23%. and Corona 
?:27) by Robt. McGregor 2:17'4 : second 
dam Orawood by Wlldwood 111, third 
dam Lady ITtterback by Mnmbrlno 
Patchen Jr. Dun Logan, her sire, had 
a trial of 2:12 and Is a full brother to 
the champion Jim Logan 2:05%. This 
filly Is a pure-gaited trotter, .lust been 
broken and will undoubtedly he a fast 
mare. Her breeding can hardly be ex- 
celled. For prices and further particu- 
lars address .». \V. MARSHALL, Dixon, 
( ill. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 



TWO GREAT SIRES. 



TheBondsman 

Reg. No. 37641 

SIRE OF 

Colorado E. (3) 2:04f, «E £ 

the, world. Winner of the Matron, American 
Horse Breeder and Kentucky Stock Farm Fu- 
turities; second in Kentucky Futurity. 

The Plunger (4) 2:07i a*™*'"*- 



old stallion of 1910. 



est 4 - year- 



Grace Bond (J) 2:09|, ™ nerh0 




II \HON WILKES 2:1S. . 

Sire of 12 In 2:10, In- 
cluding Bumps 2:03%, 
Rubenstein 2:05, Bar- 
on May 2:0714 : sired 
dams of 4 In 2:10. 



GEORGE WILKES 2:22 

Sire of 83, dams of 204. 



ni;i.I,K PATCHEN 2:30% 

In great brood mare list. 



visions of 

Kentucky Futurity. 

Creighton 2:08i, record made in 19n - 

and 83 others. 

Half brother to Jay Hawker 2:14%, sire of Country Jay 2:05V4. Susie Jay 2:06>4, 
etc. 

Half brother to The Tramp, sire of Bervaldo 2:0814, Trampfast (2) 2:1214. 
Half brother to Sorrento Todd (4) 2:1414, Belle Sentinel 2:15, etc. 

HAHBIiBTONIAN 10 

Sire of 40. 
DOLLY SPANKER 

Dam of 1. 
M VMllltlNo PATCHES 
58. 

Sire of 25, dams of 162. 
SALLl CHORISTER 
By Mamb. Chorister, 
dam of 2 in 2:20, etc. 
SENTINEL 2sn 

Sire of 8 In list. 
Mllll <>1 LEXINGTON 

By Mamb. Pilot 29. 
ABDALLAH >l \>1I1HI\0 
Sire of 15, dams of 42. 
BIG i:i,I.i:\ 

By Clark Chief. 



SOHRENTO 

Dam of Jay Hawker 
2:14%, Sorrento Todd 
(4) 2:1414. Belle Sen- 
tinel 2:15. Eola 2:1914, 
Lazy Bird 2:26%. Ted- 
dy Sentinel, 2:29%, The 
Tramp (sire), etc. 

4th dam Virgie — by Abdallah IB. 

5th dam Lucy — by Highlander (Veech's). 



GRAND SENTINEL 

2:2!»Vi 

Sire of 23, including Nel- 
lette 2:1614, Tosca 
2:18%. 



I'.Ml'ltKSS 

Dam of 2 and grandam 
of 9. 



THE BOXOSMAN is the only stallion that sired three new 2:10 performers 
with race records in 1910. In spite of the fact that he has no record, The Bonds- 
man was a colt trotter of great merit. He was a contending colt all through the 
Kentucky Futurity of 1899, getting third money. This was a six-heat race and was 
won by Boralma. As a four-year-old he was not raced, but trotted a public trial 
In 2:11. As a sire he is destined to be tho leading son of the great Baron Wilkes, 
founder of the greatest futurity winning family. 

He will make the season of 1912 at 



Pleasanton Training Park. $100 



the Season with usual 
return privilege 1913. 
Season ends June 1st. 



THE PATCHEN BOY 39033 

Three-Year-Old Record 2:10', In a Winning Race. 

Sired by the Great WILKES BOY 3803, sire of 107 in standard time. 

A Genuine Race Horse and a Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 



The Patchen Boy 39033 is sire of the following: 



Francis J 2:08 

Evelyn Patchen. ..2:10 14 
Scott Patchen ...2:1214 
Dessle Patchen . .2:13 
Frank Patchen ..2:13% 
Ruby Patchen ...2:13% 
J. C. Patchen 2:1414 



Legal Patchen ...2:1514 
Lucile Patchen ..2:16 
Jerrv Patchen ...2:1614 
Knightstown Belle2:16% 
Alec Williams . . .2:18% 

Lois Patchen 2:19% 

Auduous the Miller2 :1 9 % 



Dorothy C 

Louise Patchen . . 

Dr. Warren 

Roscoe Binning . . 
Mary Patchen 
Black Patchen . . 
and 11 others in 



2:19% 
2:19% 
2:19% 
2:20 
2:20% 
2:20% 
2:30. 



Dam I.ndy Clny, the dam of The Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%, C. W. M. 2:24% 
(trotted to high wheels), Anglin Wilkes 2:16% over half-mile track, trial 2:09%, 
by Metropolitan 1372, son of Hambletonian 10; second dam, Haggie Brown, by 
Ashland Clay; third dam, Pitty Pat, thoroughbred. The Patchen Boy was the 
greatest three-year-old race colt in the world, winning six straight races In the 
Grand Circuit the only year he was raced. His produce are good-headed and real 
race horses. (No tin cups.) 

THE PATCHEN BOY is a beautiful black. 16.1 hands and weighs 1290 pounds. 
His colts are of fine size, great individuals and the kind that sell for the high 
dollar. 



Season of 1912 at Pleasanton Training Park. Fee: 



$50 B 



privilege 1913 



Both of the Above Horses Will Remain in Califernia. 

Best of care and attention given mares, but no responsibility assumed for 
accidents. Good pasturage at reasonable rates. For further particulars and full 
tabulated pedigree, address 

WILLIAM J. WILSON, Manager, l'len»autuii, Cal. 
A Choice Collection of Kentucky Saddle Horses for Sale. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO. 



ANNOUNCE FOR 



MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 12, 1912, 

A 

Complete Dispersal Sale 

OF 

40 HEAD OF HIGHLY - BRED TROTTERS and PAGERS 

FROM THE FARM OF 

MR. GEO. E. STICKLE, Lockeford, Cal. 

Headed by a grand looking untried 4-year-old stallion by Hon Voyage 2:08, out 
of the dam of Helen Stiles 2:08^. 

Splendid brood mares by Stam B. 2:11}^, Daedalion 2:08J£, Dial. I.. 2:09)^, 
Silver Bow 2:16, Stickle and other standard sires, and out of mares by Direct 
2:053^, Chas. Derby 2:20, Silver Bow 2:16, Dorsey's Nephew, Mount Vernon and 
other high-class stallions. 

All to be sold without reserve. 

These horses are all in good condition and some will weigh 1200 pounds and 
more. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



The Finest Winter Training Track in 
America. 

— THK— 

PLEASANTON RAGE TRACK, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 

There are about 50 box stalls in first- 
class shape, newly roofed, and ready for 
occupancy. Horsemen who intend to 
campaign their horses next season should 
not delay too long if they want to pre- 
pare them on this track, which is uni- 
versally acknowledged to be the safest 
and best in existence. These stalls will 
not be vacant long. For further par- 
ticulars apply to 

H. E. ARMSTRONG, 

Proprietor. 

HOMEPHONE PRAISED. 

A new subscriber writes the Home 
Telephone Company under date of Oc- 
tober 28, 1911: 

"Please Install a phone at my home. 
I did not know anything about the good 
points of the Homephone and was 
rather prejudiced against it until I be- 
gan using it In my office. I use It all 
th'e time now, not only In phoning 
around the building, but getting outside 
numbers, because it saves me time and 
trouble. The Homephone delivers the 
goods. 

"You know the burners of candles 
rioted In London about 500 years ago 
when gas was Introduced. Most of us 
object to changes. Possibly that Is the 
reason why I am so late In ordering a 
Homephone." 

BAY CITIES 
HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 
333 Orant Ave.. San Francisco. 



SMITH'S WONDER WORKER 



Registered 



Keeps Them 
Sound 




MakesThem 
Sound 

A Positive 
Cure for 
Blemishes 
of all kinds. 



Trade Mark 

Endorsed by Horsemen the world over as the 
BEST remedy for Bowed, Strained and Rup- 
tured Tendons, Weak Joints. Cording Up, Buck 
Shins. Shoulder, Hip and Stifle Lameness and 
Rheumatism. As a Leg and Body Wash it has 
no equal. 12 per bottle prepaid, 116 per dozen, 
$10 per gallon F. O. B. Tiffin. At all harness- 
makers and druggists. W. K. SMITH. Tiffin. 
Ohio. 

WM. E. DETELS, 

Pacific Coast Agent. Pleasanton. Cal. 



The Largest Place of Its Kind West of Chicago! 



G. Lindauer 

Proprietor. 

UNION LIVERY and SALE STABLES 

Work Horses to Let. 
Country Horses for Sale. 

Horses and mules bought and sold 

122-124 Clara St.. bet. Fourth and Fifth, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phone Kearny 659. Home J 2643. 

Special attention paid to the purchase and 
shipment of horses and mules to foreign and 
domestic ports. 

CHAS. WHITEHEAD'S 

Public Training Stable 

Pleasanton Race Track 
PLEASANTON, CAL. 

Horses and colts trained at reason- 
able rates for next season's campaign. 
Best of care given. Developed and 
campaigned successfully the Futurity 
stake winners North Star 2:11%, Delia 
Derby 2:11% and many others. Address 

( HAS. WHITEHEAD, Pleasanton, Cal. 

PUBLIC TRAINING STABLE. 

DICK WILSON 

Of Pleasanton 

Announces he will train a few good 
"prospects" for outside owners this 
winter and prepare them for next sea- 
son's campaign at very reasonable 
rates. Mr. Wilson has given IB horses 
race records of 2:10 or better. 61 with 
records of 2:15 or better, besides giv- 
ing the double team Hedgewood Boy 
and Lady Maud C. the world's record 
to pole of 2:02%, besides winning many 
races with them. Address DICK WIL- 
SON, Race Track, Pleasanton, Cal. 



MM 

HOTEL 

ENTIRXLY REBUILT 
JINCt THE F I RE. 

Far famed and first 
named wherever good 
hotels are mentioned. 

Recognized as the headquarter or 
the businessmen of the world. 
The place where you always find 
your friends. 

European plan only. 

Management 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

M FRANCI5C0 

Sunset Limited 



An entirely new luxuriously furnished, 
vacum cleaned, steel car train 

From San Francisco 0:00 p. m. Tuesdays 
and Fiidays through Los Angeles and 
El Paso to New Orleans in 70 hours via 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Connecting at New Orleans with "New 
Orleans-New York Limited" for Atlanta, 
Baltimore, Washington, and New York; 
Illinois Central, Seaboard Air Line, 
Louisville & Nashville and other lines 
for St. Louis, Cincinnati, Chicago and 
Atlantic Coast Cities, as well as New Or- 
leans-New York SS Line for New York 
direct. 

Dinner service unequaled by the finest 
hotels or restaurants. Parlor observa- 
tion car with library, ladies' parlor, buf- 
fet, latest magazines and newspapers. 

Stenographer, barber, valet, shower 
bath, ladies' maid, manicure. Cour- 
teous and attentive employees. Excess 
fare $10.00. 

Write or call on our nearest agent for in- 
formation and reservations. 

Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealer. In PAPER 

37-1 st St., San Franoiaco, Cal. 

Blake, Mofflt <& Towne, Los Angei.a. 
Blake. Mr Kali .t Co.. Portland, ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art In 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artistic Designing 
121 Second St., San Franolseo 



THICK, SWOLLEN GLANDS 



that make a horse Wheeze, 
Hour, have Thick Wind or 
Choke-down, can be re- 
moved with 




I0RBINE 



also any Bunch or Swelling. No 
bl later, no hair gone, and 
horso kept at wurk per bot- 
tle, delivered nook 3 E free. 

ABSORBINE, .IK., liniment for mankind. 
Reduces Goitre, Tumors. Wens. Painful, Knotted 
Varicose Veins, Ulcers II 00 and C! 00 a bottle at 
Oealeis ot delivered. Book with testimonials free, 
to r Y00NG.P D F, 54 Temple St.. Springfield. Man. 

For sale by Langley A Michaels, San Francisco, Calif.; 
Woodward, Clara 4 Co., Portland, Ore.. F. W. Braun Co., 
Brunswig Drug Co., Western Wholesale Drug Co., Los An- 

8eles. Calif: Kirk, Cleary A Co., Sacramento, Calif.; PacUc 
irug Co., Seattle, Wash., Spokane Dru" 2o., Spokane, Wash. 

Coffin. Redlngton Co. .San Franciaco. Cal. 



Ewes should be two years old be- 
fore being bred. 



Saturday, January 27, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



The Man Who has Come Back. 

The host of admirers of what the veteran war horse of the shooting game — The 
Hon. T. Bill Crosby— has done lately with his 34-inch barrel Parker gun, will be 
glad to read the following, viz: 

In the Eastern Handicap . . 100 out of 100 targets. 
In the Western Handicap . . 492 out of 500 targets. 
In Evansville, Ind., Tournament 395 out of 400 targets. 



Making a continuous run of 987 out of 1000 targets 

The only straight score ever recorded in the Grand American Handicap 

event was made with a Parker gun, scoring 100 out of 100 at 19 yards rise. Further- 
more the same Old Reliable has won the National Championship of America 

every year it has been shot for. 

For information regarding small bore guns, address the pioneer makers of the 



20 gauge 

PARKER BROS., 



Meriden, Conn. 



N. Y. Salesrooms. 32 Warren Street. 

Resident Agent: A. W. du Bray, P. O. Box 102, San Francisco 

GOLCHER BROS. 



Camping 
Goods. 




Fishing 
Tackle. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 

510 Market St., San Francisco 



Get Your Stallion's Picture 



IN THE 



Breeders Special 
Number 

OF THE 

Breeder and Sportsman 

WILL BE PUBLISHED 

Saturday, March 9, 1912 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this Coast. 

IF YOU OWN A GOOD MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the 
best stallions on the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a work of 



reference. 



AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers, and those who are interested in Field Sports, it will be 
particularly valuable. 



OWNERS OF STALLIONS 



who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. Write for price 
and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco. 



ONE. TWO. THREE. 



THE OFFICIAL AMATEUR SEASON'S 
AVERAGES FOR 1911 



FIRST 



\ SECOND 



Allen Heil — HIGH ON DOUBLES 

Allentown, Pa. 
174 out of 200 87 per cent 

u J. R. Graham— SECOND HIGH ON SINGLES 

Ingleside, 111. 

SECOND HIGH ON DOUBLES 

3877 out of 4050 95.72 per cent 

3(59 out of 450 82.00 per cent 

THIRD— J. P. White — THIRD HIGH ON SINGLES 

Watertown, S. D. 

3037 out of 3190 95.20 per cent 

THESE GENTLEMEN SHOT 

du Pont Sporting' Powders 

The Powders which are used by Record Makers. 

Insist on your shells for field and trap-shooting being loaded with the 
Regular and Reliable brands. 

1 E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Pioneer Powder Makers of America. 

2 Established 1802. Wilmington, Delaware. 



Mr. Graham's shooting was done in all sections of the country under 
varied conditions, including in the above the entire Program for the 1911 
Post Season Tournament at St. Louis where conditions were extremely diffi- 
cult. ^ 



MANUFACTURERS 
A Jy OUTFITTERS 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER*! 
ATHLETE 



•4-8-52 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
AJ"> APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 




mith Gun 

HUNTER ONE — TRICGER 

WEATHER conditions aren't always at 
their best in the "blind" or In the 
skiff. That's when you don't want 
your gun to balk or double. 
YOU CAN easily wear gloves if you 
shoot with a Hunter One-Trigger. 
And without "fiddling." It wont 
balk— because there is no friction to 
make it balk. And It won't double— 
beeauso there is no second trigger to 
get tangled up In your glove. 
The very newest Hammorless Smith Gun 
is the 20-(iauge Hunter One-Trigger. 
Weighs only f> 3 /4 to 7 lbs. Just the finest 
gun that can be made at the low price. 
Write for free Catalog to-day 
The Hunter Arm» Co 
Hubbard St.. 



Fulton 
N 






TALLION OWNER 

If lfi need of northing In tho lino of Stallion Cards, compiled nnd 
prlntod, Tabulated redlgrool. Stock Catalogues, Horso Hooks 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts In stock and made from photos, 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, l'regnatons aud all Specialties 
for Stallions. x : ; Write for samples and prions. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICA60. 



±£5 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1912. 




CHOSEN 



THE PROOF 



Arrow and Nitro Club 
^ Steel Lined Shot Shells 

— because the steel lining insures better pattern, better penetration and greater velocity for the same load. 
— because the steel lining gives strength to the shell and protection to the shooter. 
— because this important improvement doesn't cost any more. 

— Remington-IMC Steel Lined Shells have won every Interstate Handicap for two years straight with this 
year's Southern Handicap at Charlotte, N. C, added to the list. 

peming ton?uMC —the perfect shooting combination. 



/ REMINGTON-ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY, - - 299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 

^vxx^N^NXxx^^.NN^vx^Nv^\^^\vN^vvwvNxv^^xsNNVvxNXNV\^.NXNXxx^\NNXXN\x\x^v , vvN^xxxNXXNXX^v^\NNNXNNNNNN^\^-v^.xv^^ 

WINCHHTER 

Rifle, Revolver and Pistol Cartridges. 

When you buy cartridges, always insist upon getting Winchester make — 
the Red W Brand. Then you will have as good cartridges as it is possible 
to produce. No matter how good your rifle, revolver or pistol may be in 
itself, unless you use good cartridges in it, you will not get good results. 
Winchester cartridges are made for all makes of rifles, revolvers and pistols, 
and, while they do not cost any more than many inferior brands, they are 
superior to all others in strength, accuracy and uniformity. Being manu- 
facturers of both arms and ammunition, we are able to approach the subject of ammunition 
making from both sides, the result being the manufacture of practical ammunition that 
gives the best results in all firearms. Remember to ask for the Red W Brand. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., - NEW HAVEN, CONN. 





Velocity, Pattern, Penetration ! 

Thats why SELBY LOADS 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., San Francisco. 



Are Consistent Winners. 

Not only in 1911 but for years past the Amateurs — the men who pay for their guns and am- 
munition—have shot SELBY LOADS and WON CONSISTENTLY at every 

shoot on the Pacific Coast. 

REMEMBER— WITH SELBY LOADS 

LOADED ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

ALWAYS FRESH, ALWAYS RELIABLE, BACKED BY THE SELBY GUARANTEE. 

"Special Loads at a Moment's Notice." 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912. 



$1,600 Guaranteed. 




CALIFORNIA BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Canfield - Clark Stake No. 4 

For foals of 1911 to trot and pace as 2-year-olds in 1913. 



Guaranteed $1,600. 



$1,000 for Trotting Foals. 



TO BE CIVEN BY THE 



$600 for Pacing Foals. 



CALIFORNIA BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Entries to Close March 1, *12. 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS— March 1, 1912, $2 to nominate a foal; June 1, 1912, $5; 
Sept. 1, 1912, $5; Doc. 1, 1912, $10; March 1, 1913, $10; Parting payments $15 lor 
pacers. $25 for trotters, ten days before the meeting begins at which the races are to take place. 

CONDITIONS. 

The race will be one-mile heats, 2 In 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by entrance fee 
Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments 

This Association is liable for $1600, the amount of the guarantee only. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory 
Membership not required to enter. Owners must become members to start. 
Money divided 50, 25. 15. 10 per cent. 

There will be no more moneys than there are starters. 
Other than exceptions made in this entry, 




C. A. CANFIELD, President. 



rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 
Write for entry blanks and further information to 



:. J. DELOKE 
South *>|>riiiK 



V, Secretary, 
St., I. on Angrelea, Cal 



MT. DIABLO CEMENT 

bast for foundations, dairy floors, fruit dryer floors, etc. etc. 

SANTA CRUZ LIME 

best for bricklaying and plastering. 

MT. DIABLO LIME 

best for spraying and whitewashing. 
WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICE8 ON ALL BUILDING MATERIAL. 

HENRY COWELL LIME & CEMENT COMPANY 

9 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Complete Dispersal Sale 

40 HEAD OF HIGHLY - BRED TROTTERS and PACERS 



FROM THE FARM OF 

Mr. Geo. E. Stickle, Lockeford, Cal. 

AT CHASE'S PAVILION, 478 VALENCIA STREET, SAN FRAOCISCO 

MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 12, 1012, 

A 4-year-old stallion hy Bon Voyage 8:08, out of the dam of Helen Stiles 2:08}£. 
Brood mares hy Stam B. 2:11%, Daedalion 2:08^, Diablo 2:09%, Mount 
Vernon 2:15%, Silver Bow 2:1(1, Stickle and other standard sires. 
Three, four, five and six-year-old fillies and geldings. 
All to be sold without reserve. 

These horses are all in good condition and some will weigh 1200 pounds and 
more. 

A number of good work stock and drivers — mares, geldings and mules — will be 
sold the same evening. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



McADRIAN 2:24 



Reg. No. 
45391. 



Sire of 



l liert Kelly (trial) 2:11% 
Trix McAdrlan . . 2:2894 
( Grace Chalmers UrV2:24 

Sired by GUY MeKINNEY (sire of Vernon McKinnev 2:02, Linden Girl 2:22, 
etc.); dam MAI'1.10 I.K.VF 2.:M : <., by Adrian 2:L'«i. 2 (sire of Roseta A. 2:14% ). son 
of Reliance 2:22% and Adriana by Skenandoah; McAdrian's grandam was oi.i.ii: 
KAY dam of Acclamation 2:24% (sire of Lizzie C. 2:15), Vendome, dam of 

McKinley 2:21); his ^reat grandam was JIAKY Ml. AIM-; by Signal :;:>27 (sire of the 
dam of Prussian Maid 2:19, etc). Guy McKinney, sire of McAdrian 2:24, was by 
McKinney 2:ll'/4, out of Flossie D., by Guy Wilkes 2:15%; second dam, Blanche 
Ward (dam of China Maid 2:05%), by Onward 2:25V4; third dam, Blanche Patchen. 
by Mambrino Patchen 58, etc. 

McAdrian is one of the handsomest and strongest made grandsons of Mc- 
Kinney in California. He has no faults; is a pure gaited trotter and a sure foal 
getter. He will make the season of 1912 at the Pleasanton race track. Terms. 
$30 for the season. For further particulars, apply to or address 

E. D. DIGGES, Owner, Pleaaanton, Cal. 

FOR SALE— Electeur Jr. 

A 9ne /oung Perelieron 8 tallies, six 

years old next April. Weighs 2400 
pounds. He was sired by Electeur, 
imported from France in 1904, sired 
6y Valtalque 25159; dam, Sultane 
43394; second dam, Biche 17881; third 
dam, Pelotte 1850. Electeur Jr. is 
solid black in color, well formed in 
every respect and is a sure foal getter. 
His dam is by Uptumus, he by Duke 
of de Charters, the most celebrated 
horse in the United States. No finer 
Percheron Stallion is in the State. Can 
be seen at the McCarty Ranch, 4% 
miles northeast of Suisun. Price very 
reasonable. BO. Mel' ARTY, Owner, 
Salem, Cnl. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 




Spring Combination Sale 

FRED H. CHASE & CO. 



announce the date of 



Monday, Evening', March 18, *12, 

FOR THE 

FIRST BIG COMBINATION SALE 



The Market is Good. 

Write for Entry Blanks. 



OF THE YEAR. 

Make Your Consignments Early. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO. 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco 




TALLION OWNER 

If in need of anything in the line of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts in stock anil undo from photos. 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, 1'regnators ami all Specialties 
for Stall ions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St, CHICAGO. 



Mew Edition of John Splan's Book 

"Life With the Trotter" 

Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With u.» Trotoer rives ua a clear insight into the ways and means to he adopted to increase 
pam. and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculoatea the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. Bbekdrr and Sportsman V. O. Drawer 447. San Krancasoo. Oal. 

Pacific B1<1«.. Oor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



Get Your Stallion Advertisements in the 



Breeder and Sportsman— the Season is now on. 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sporting Authority of tho Paolflo Coast. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 

r. W. KEIXEY. Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts. , San Francisco. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

National Newspaper Bureau Agent. 219 East 23rd St., New York City 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Office. 

Terms— One Year, $3; Six Months, $1.75: Three Months. $1. 
Foreign postage $1 per year additional ; Canadian postage 50c 
per year additional. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. 0. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not neoessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIOSS ADVERTISED. 

AEROLITE 2:07% 

Sutherland & Chailbourne, Pleasanton 

ARJIOND LOU 2:27% Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet 

A1RLIE DEMONIO 51610 Chas. Johnson, Woodland 

BON VOYAGE 2:0S Ted Hayes, Los Angeles 

BON VOLONTE 2:19% Ted Hayes, Los Angeles 

GEO. W. McKINNEY 2:14% . .Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet 
KINNEY DE LOPEZ (1) 2:23 

Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet 

McADRIAN 2:24 E. D. Diggs, Pleasanton 

THE BONPSMAN Chas. L. De Ryder, Pleasanton 

THE PATCHEN BOY 2:10% 

Chas. L. De Rvder, Pleasanton 

WM. HAROLD 2 :13 % . . . . James D. Johnstone, Elmhurst 



SINCE THE announcement that measures would 
be taken toward holding the biggest light harness 
race meeting ever held in America at the enlarged 
Stadium, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, many 
suggestions have been offered that a horse show and 
livestock exhibition be held in conjunction with it, 
and, with a few preliminaries arranged, there is no 
reason why they should not. These are separate 
institutions, however, and do not come within the 
scope of those most deeply interested in light har- 
ness horses. Those who manage the horse shows 
and all who are interested in the breeding of choice 
cattle, sheep and hogs, are men who have devoted 
the better portion of their lives to these industries. 
Hence, each should be controlled by those who are 
best qualified to carry out the ideas of the organi- 
zations they represent, yet all can work harmoniously 
together. The trotting horse men will have all they 
can attend to properly in formulating plans, arrang- 
ing classes, and deciding upon purses and stakes and 
also in placing the track and all its appointments 
in first-class order. The stabling for a large number 
of horses must also be attended to, and these stables 
can be utilized by those who are to give the horse 
show and the great livestock exhibitions, — three of 
the most lucrative attractions of the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition. There is plenty of land available for the 
erection of these stables and all that will be needed 
close to the Stadium will be cooling-out sheds to 
accommodate the horses which are to appear each 
day. 

Horse shows, — those that have been the most suc- 
cessful, — are always held in some large pavilion at 
night, where, under the glare of thousands of electric 
lights, the fashionable world gathers to watch the 
splendidly trained carriage, road and saddle horses 
perform on the tanbark. It is a society event whether 
held in St. Petersburg, Vienna, Paris, London, New 
York, or Chicago. There are outdoor horse shows, 
but they are generally held on some landed estate 
where the equipages of the rich may be shown to 
advantage; but these are not remunerative to their 
promoters and neither are they given for that pur- 
pose. Here, in California, where the people can 
depend upon pleasant weather all summer, it may 
be that the promoters will hold their show in the 
open air; but that is an after consideration and will 
depend upon the judgment of those having this fea- 
ture in charge. 

The livestock exhibition can be held in the open, 
too, and when the Stadium is fenced and an admis- 
sion fee charged the attendance will be large, for 
there is no doubt the public will receive the full 
value of their money in seeing the finest specimens 
of the various breeds of cattle, sheep and hogs ever 
gathered at one place in America. There will be 
prize winners from England, Scotland, France, Hol- 
land, Australia, New Zealand, the Argentine Republic, 
Canada, as well as from the United States, all com- 
peting for such valuable prizes as will be offered, and 
that sterling organization, the Livestock Breeders' 
Association of California, is energetically working to 
have this attraction meet all their expectations. 

As stated above, these three "specialties" will be 



governed by their respective organizations, but all 
will be subservient to a committee appointed by the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition. That these exhibits will 
attract thousands of people and prove of inestimable 
value to all who are living on this Coast no thought- 
ful person can deny. Many of those who come and 
see what this Coast is capable of producing in com- 
parison with all other countries in the way of fast 
trotting horses, coach, harness and saddle horses, 
sleek looking cattle, fine sheep and goats, and prize- 
winning hogs, at a less cost than anywhere else in 
the world, will, no doubt, strive to buy land and 
engage in some particular branch which suits them 
best. This is the class of newcomers we want, and 
these are the exhibitions that will bring them here. 

Referring to the enlargement of the Stadium, it 
will not be for these specific purposes. The Olympic 
Games of 1915 will doubtless be held during the 
Exposition upon these grounds, and by placing a fence 
around this splendid mile track a revenue will be 
obtained on this occasion which will go far toward 
defraying all expenses incurred. The infield will then 
be large enough for sports of every kind, — baseball 
games, football games, trap-shooting tournaments, 
polo tournaments, and rifle-shooting contests between 
the various militia companies; while the outer or 
main track can be used for processions of people 
of all nations, drilling contests between civic and 
military organizations, chariot racing, and countless 
other attractions. The fencing, therefore, of this 
track will be imperative. Hence, this work will not 
necessarily be done exclusively for the benefit of the 
light harness horse men; it will be in the nature of 
a permanent and indispensable improvement. 
o 

ALL who are interested in the light harness horse 
industry are waiting patiently to learn the result of 
the conference between the committee appointed 
by the Pacific Coast Racing and Fair Association 
and the delegates from the North Pacific Circuit, 
which was held last Thursday at Walla Walla. 
Upon the outcome of this discussion much depends. 
If the dates set at the meeting held in this city 
two weeks ago are satisfactory to our northern 
neighbors there will be another meeting called in 
this city to perfect arrangements for the fulfillment 
of the desires of the majority of trotting horse men in 
California and Arizona. Since the announcement 
that a continuous circuit is contemplated there 
has been quite a revival among all who have a love 
for fast trotters and pacers, and many of the owners 
have been quietly considering who would be the 
very best men and where would be the best and 
most accessible race tracks for them to send 
their well-bred colts and fillies to. At Los An- 
geles it is estimated that there are over 300 
horses in training — more than at any other race 
track in the United States; at Pleasanton there are 
over 200; at San Jose there must be over 100; at 
Sacramento there are at least sixty; Marysville, 
forty; Fresno, thirty-five; Salinas, thirty-five; 
Woodland, thirty; Alameda, about thirty, while at 
other places there must be cm an average twenty. 
Some of these are just being handled — not devel- 
oped — but it shows that the interest in them is 
being aroused, and with the promise of big stakes 
and purses and no delays between the cities on the 
Pacific Coast Circuit from Vancouver, B. C, to Phoe- 
nix, Arizona, there will be more and better oppor- 
tunities for winning money than ever and the pros- 
pect of selling a really high-class trotter or pacer 
for a good figure is much brighter. Some that will 
score for the word this year as two and three year 
olds will be seen at the big meeting in 1915 at the 
Stadium. There is no reason why they should not, 
if they are not "killed off." Horses at five and six 
years of age, if developed and not injured, will 
train on and develop more speed. There will be 
races for all classes at that race meeting and pres- 
ent indications are most favorable for its becoming 
a reality. The light harness horse industry, there- 
fore, never looked brighter or more inviting, and 
everything connected with it has a tendency to make 
it better every year. 

o 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN will issue a 
Breeders' Number on March 9th which will be spe- 
cially devoted to stallion owners and their horses. 
It will not only serve to give stallion owners an op- 
portunity to start their campaign for patronage in the 
right way, but it will also aim to present to them 
many features that will prove interesting and valu- 
able. There will be able and exhaustive articles on 
some of the sires that have made our California-bred 



trotters famous, and their histories will be graph- 
ically described. There will be statistical tables and 
data which will prove valuable to our readers. It will 
be a number worth keeping. As an advertising me- 
dium to confer the maximum amount of value on its 
patrons it will possess features which will make it 
interesting in its particular field and every owner of a 
good mare will receive a copy. Owners of stallions 
cannot invest a small amount of money to a greater 
advantage than in claiming space in its columns. The 
circulation of this journal is world-wide, and is 
increasing with great rapidity. Only a few weeks re- 
main for advertisers to prepare copy for this Breed- 
ers' Number. Heretofore, we have received most en- 
couraging news from owners of stallions and adver- 
tisers who have patronized these "special numbers" 
and this one for 1912 will be no exception. 

o 

HORSEMEN AND THE HOPPLE RULE. 



County fair managers in Ohio and Indiana have 
within a few days passed resolutions which will be 
presented at the approaching biennial meetings of 
the National Trotting Association and the American 
Trotting Association urging those organizations to 
repeal the present rule of harness racing which pro- 
vides for the gradual abolition of hopples on all trot- 
ting tracks in the United States and Canada. Mana- 
gers of many other minor half-mile tracks have lately 
gone on record in favor of repealing the rule, and it 
is said that an effort to accomplish this purpose will 
be made in February, notwithstanding the fact that 
the rule is only just beginning to affect a few of the 
younger pacers and will not be in full operation untU 
1914. 

Most of the opposition to the rule comes from those 
fairs and country half-mile rings whose managers 
generally have no particular interest in improving 
the breed of trotting horses. The main thing with 
iTio&t of them is to get as many entries as possible 
for their races, and when convinced that more en- 
tries will be forthcoming with the hopples than with- 
out the hopples, they are in favor of repealing the 
rule. The vote was unanimous at the annual meet- 
ing of the "Ohio Fair Boys," and substantially so 
among the Indiana secretaries. 

Practically every representative horse breeder in 
the country, on the other hand, is strongly in favor 
of standing by the present rule and abolishing the 
hopples. With the breeders are allied the majority 
of the mile tracks and a few of the half-mile rings. 
Numerically the opponents of hopples are probably 
in a majority among all the track managers who will 
be represented at the February meetings of the 
N. T. A. and the A. T. A., since the county fairs and 
country half-mile tracks far outnumber the mile 
courses, and each track, whether big or little, has one 
vote and no more in the congress. 

If the proposition to repeal the rule and permit 
pacers to race with their legs tied together were 
submitted direct to all members of the National 
Trotting Association and the American Trotting 
Association, few horsemen would expect to see the 
present rule saved from repeal, but with nine out of 
ten members represented by proxy at the biennial 
congress, and with most of the proxies and all the 
machinery in the hands of breeders and others who 
are personally opposed, to repeal it is another story. 
That the Ohio Fair and others will try to repeal the 
rule before it has gone into full operation is not 
believed by well-informed horsemen, while a good 
many are confident that those who control the Na- 
tional Trotting Association and the American Trot- 
ting Association will stand their ground to the end 
and sweep the hoppled pacers off the turf. 

Apparently expecting such an outcome, the fair 
managers are already talking about a new organiza- 
tion similar to the National Trotting Association and 
the American Trotting Association, but made up of 
tracks which favor the hopples. The plan would be 
to draw away from the older organizations such of 
their members as favored the retention of the hop- 
plod pacer, and this would mean practically all half- 
mile tracks, as well as some of the Western mile 
tracks, making perhaps 75 per cent of all the tracks 
in the country. That the leaders of old associations 
would never let their members go without a fight is 
regarded as a foregone conclusion. Their probable 
course would be to borrow the big stick of the 
Jockey Club and "outlaw" all horses and horsemen 
racing at meetings not "sanctioned" by the National 
Trotting Association or the American Trotting Asso- 
ciation, and thus control the situation. 

o 

THE DALLAS (TEXAS) FAIR. 

Secretary Sydney Smith, of the State Fair, of 
Texas, writes as follows: 

At a meeting of the board of directors of the State 
Fair, of Texas, held January 5th, it was unanimously 
voted to lend every additional encouragement to 
racing at their 1912 meeting by offering two stakes 
of $5,000 each and four stakes of $2,500 each, all in 
addition to the regular program of twenty-one purse 
races. 

As this is quite a material increase in the earning 
capacity over the programs given in former years, 
we trust that this will meet with the approval of the 
Eastern and Western horsemen. 

Mr. W. A. Clark Jr. has selected the name Bon 
Courage for his Bon McKlnney-Helen Keyes colt. 
This colt is entered in all the futurities on the Coast. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 8, 1912. 



AT THE "HISTORIC TRACK," PLEASANTON. 

List of Trotters and Pacers in Training There, and 
Who Is Handling Them. 

"What a blessing this rain is!" was the remark an 
old horseman made last Friday as he gazed on the 
low lying hills surrounding the Livermore Valley. 
The mantle of green with which they are covered 
gives promise of bountiful crops of hay and grain, 
and at this season of the year the view is magnifi- 
cent. "The reason I say this," added the speaker, 
"is, that the farmers, stockmen, and everyone de- 
pendent upon them in this choice agricultural region, 
. can rejoice while they are resting, and the horses 
that were beginning to trot and pace phenomenally 
fast quarters and halves at this track will have a 
chance to recuperate from the severe work they have 
been doing, and which they should net do for at 
least another month." 

The following day (Saturday) the sun came out in 
all his glory, his warm rays causing clouds of vapor 
to rise from the moisture-laden fields and meadows 
in the valley and trees and shrubbery on the hills 
and mountain sides. At 10 o'clock the track was 
drying fast, but horsemen were not allowed to drive 
over it until some time after noon. They contented 
themselves, however, by having the shoers attend to 
the shoeing of their horses, so these "knights of the 
anvil" were kept busily engaged all day. The grooms 
were busy washing and overhauling their assort- 
ments of boots, oiling harness, and adjusting their 
bikes; because in Pleasanton they know that in forty- 
eight hours after the heaviest rainstorm these will 
be required, for horses can be jogged then and care- 
fully exercised. 

What a busy place it was when I arrived at the 
track. Havis James was superintending the unload- 
ing of some splendid red oat hay which had just ar- 
rived from Livermore, and everybody seemed to be 
working with a will to clean away all the mud, dirt, 
and debris which accumulated during the protracted 
storm. A walk by the long rows of stalls revealed 
the fact that, with the exception of about twenty, 
every one was occupied. It recalled memories 
of the past and the men who became noted as famous 
reinsmen. At every turn something familiar remind- 
ed me of those men who were in their prime twenty 
years ago. Many of them are resting from their 
labors in their last long sleep, while others are living 
where they can be near some race track, and once 
in a while we hear of them driving in some good 
race. Those who have passed away include John 
A. Goldsmith, "Directum" Kelly, Jim Dustin, Jimmy 
Sullivan, Lee Shaner, Geo. Bayless, Johnny McCon- 
nell, Tommy Keating, John Blue, and the man that 
some of these men worked for, Monroe Salisbury. 
Those that are still able to come up for the word 
are Geo. Starr, Millard Sanders, Andy McDowell, 
Johnny Dickerson, "Sandy" Smith, Ben Walker, be- 
sides those who are still to be seen at this track, the 
members of the "Old Guard." This was the track 
upon which many world's champions learned their 
first lessons in the way to go, and from the little 
depot at Pleasanton they quietly slipped away every 
spring to thrill thousands of admirers wherever they 
raced, and on their return were received by the entire 
populace of this pretty place, while the band led the 
procession to this track playing "Behold the Con- 
quering Hero Comes," and "Home, Sweet Home." 

But these are merely reveries. I must return to 
the all-absorbing work of getting information for 
our readers. Charles L. De Ryder, having just 
leased all of Capt. McCan's trotting, draft, and saddle 
stallions, as well as his collection of young mares, 
was very busy, but graciously accompanied me 
around to where his horses were standing knee- 
deep in straw. He gave me an outline of their breed- 
ing as follows: 

The first one looked at Is his nice, upstanding year- 
ling by Charley D. 2:06%, out of Gertie A., by Diablo 
2:09%; this pacer is entered in all the stakes and 
promises to be larger than his brother, Victor Pointer. 

The next one is Direct Pointer, a two-year-old by 
Star Pointer 1:59%, out of Directola, by Direct 2:05%, 
dam Steinola, by Steinway 2:25%, and then back to 
old Minnehaha (dam of 8, including Beautiful Bells 
2:29%). This is a good one. His dam, Directola, 
was recently purchased by Mr. I. L. Borden, of San 
Francisco, and is heavy with foal to the great 
Aerolite 2:07%. 

In an adjoining stall is a stout, substantially made 
five-year-old pacing gelding called Nutcome, by Nut- 
wood Wilkes 2:16%, out of a mare by Welcome 
2:10%. He is a pacer. 

Vela Alta, a very fast pacing mare, although on 
the small order, is another belonging to A. V. Men- 
denhall, a prominent Oakland attorney, who is also 
an enthusiastic horseman. 

June Pointer, another "Pointah hoss," as Old 
Wash" affectionately termed this breed of pacers, is 
looking strong and rugged and will be a factor in 
the races of 1912. He is out of Perza, by Allie 
Wilkes 2:15, and belongs to S. Christenson. June 
Pointer has paced better than 2:09, and, at present, 
is the sole occupant of the paddock in which Direct, 
2:05% once cavorted around to Monroe Salisbury's] 
amusement. 

Mr. De Ryder pointed with pride to a lusty looking] 
yearling which belongs to Col. J. C. Kirkpatrick.' 
manager of the Palace and Fairmont Hotels. This' 
colt is by Charley D. 2:06%, out of Elsie, by Silver! 
Bow 2:16; second dam Addie S. (dam of Sidane 2: 23%,! 
and dams of Meridian 2:12% and Imp 2:19%), by 
Steinway 2:25%; third dam Aldane, by Wissahickonj 
947 (son of Wm. Welch, by Hambletonian 10, and 
Lady Montague, by Mambrino Chief 11, etc.); fourthl 
dam Winthrop Girl, by Winthrop 505; fifth dam by 



Chieftain, etc. He is a pacer and should be one of 
the do-or-die kind. 

The next one looked at is a compactly built, round- 
barreled three-year-old light roan filly by Bodaker 
2:13, the crippled stallion that raced so well in Char- 
ley James' string last season. The dam of this one 
is Tannahika, by Athadon 2:27. 

P. H. Smith's little string of choice trotters is here, 
and doing well; Seville S., by Strathway 2:19, out 
of Siramone by Simmons 2:28; Katherine 2:19, by 
Diablo 2:09%, and Rosemary, by Raymon, — these are 
square trctters; then there is a very smooth going 
pacer, Santa Rita Girl, by Zolock 2:05%, out of 
Marguerite 2:16%, that will keep her company busy 
to pass her this season. The yearling colts and fillies 
by El Volante 2:13%, and Zombro 2:11 are taking 
on llesh and getting over their nervousness. The 
dark chestnut filly Blanka S., by Red McK., out of 
Katharine 2:19, is being exercised and strengthened. 
She is a credit to any owner. 

D. L. Bachant's bay filly by Athasham 2:09%, out 
of Oortone Neilson, by Clarence Wilkes, is doing well. 
This mare Corinne Neilson was the dam of that won- 
derful trotter Perfection, trial 2:06%, that was sold 
for ? 10,000, but died before she could be raced. 

A. L. Scott, President of the State Agricultural 
Society, has three here that will soon be fit for hard 
work. They are Weatewater, a beautifully gaited 
trotter by Sidney Dillon; Bon Prix, a two-year-old by 
Bon Voyage 2:08, and Le Voyage 2:25%, by Bon 
Voyage 2:08, out of Missie Medium (also dam of Bon 
Volonte 2:25%), by Rampart 2930; grandam Belle 
Medium 2:20 (great broodmare), by Happy Medium 
400, etc. These three will get low records this year, 
for their improvement since Mr. De Ryder has had 
them is most marked. 

W. T. Sesnon's San Felipe, by Zombro 2:11, is 
enjoying himself by trotting miles in 2:45, but that 
is no measure of his speed. It is predicted he will 
lower all records made by the Zombro tribe this year. 

John Haven is the name of a three-year-old pacer 
owned by Messrs. Mendenhall ft Haven. John is by 
Star Pointer, out of a mare bv Washington McKinney 
2:17%. 

Ben Wright, by Chas. Derby 2:20, is a six-year-old 
green trotter whose dam was Inex (dam of 3 in 
2:30), by Sweepstakes 298. Mr. A. V. Mendenhall, 
his owner, just brought him in; he was never on a 
race track before. Maybe that's the reason he has 
always been right. 

The flaxen-maned Sidney Dillon mare. Martina Dil- 
lon, whose dam was by the Electioneer horse Mor- 
timer, once owned by the late Wilfred Page, of Cotati, 
"is the goods," as the boys say. She is a very prom- 
ising "prospect" for the green class of trotters. 

There is another of the Star Pointer family in an 
adjoining stall. He is called Star Tilden, and belongs 
to Geo. W. Putnam, who resides in Salt Lake. This 
likelv pacer will be in the 2:10 list; his dam was by 
Roy Wilkes 2:06%. 

C. Lee Jones, of Modesto, who owned Carlokin 
2:07%, during his Eastern racing career, has Jonesy 
Mc. a counterpart of his sire, Carlokin, out of a mare 
by Waldstein 2:22%. He is only a four-year-old. but 
is the making of a very fast horse. There is a sister 
of his here, a year older, that is also a perfect-gaited 
trotter. 

Frank Malcolm, of Fresno, has sent Eddie Mc 
2:29% here, and a two-year-old filly by the stoutly 
bred stallion Expressive Mac 2:25%. The former is 
a pacer and the latter a pure trotter. 

Able Direct (full brother to that remarkably fast 
filly Irnia Direct), by Robert Direct, is also looked at. 
He belongs to Mr. Bachant. of Fresno. 

Mr. De Ryder will have in his string, besides The 
Bondsman and The Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%. Orlena 
2:11, by Ormonde 2:08%, out of Helena 2:11%. by 
Electioneer; the great two-year-old Ethel Tndding- 
ton. by Toddington 2:20; Hazel Patchen 2:13%, by 
The Patchen Boy, and Lucille Patchen 2:10, by the 
same sire. Besides these, he will have Ouragon. the 
champion three-year-old Belgian stallion in Califor- 
nia. He intends to have this horse go to Livermore, 
where he will be bred to some of the big draft mares 
there. He also has the Kentucky saddle horse which 
Capt. McCan bought last year. 

Mr. S. S. Bailey, who for many years was one of 
Seattle's foremost citizens and later was • one of 
Salem's representative men. has quite a string of 
fine horses and takes a personal interest in their 
welfare. If kindness, good care and a thorough 
knowledge of the business will insure success in this 
calling. Mr. Bailey should meet with no failures. 

In the first stall is a big fine bay gelding called 
Moses, by Tidal Wave 2:06»i, out of a Bessie L. (dun 
of Waverly B. (p) 2:23%), by Montana Director. 
He is onlv three years old. and Mr. Bailey savs that 
when he first saw him he was lying in the bullrushes 
with his mother looking curiousiv at him. so he 
thought of a Biblical name and called him Moses. 

He has another brother to Moses he calls Job. 
. which he named because he stood so pntientlv while 
< a badly injured hind leg was being treated when the 
8 voungster was a foal. He is also one cf his best 
horses. 

Holly Brand, by Tidal Wave 2:06%. is a nacer out 
jof a mare by Coeur d'Alene. second dam by Alexis, 
[that. Mr. Bailey esteems very highly. 

Tom Seattle is a bav pacing gelding, two years 
|old. by Prince Seattle 2:25%, dam Orma A. 2:10%. 

Geo. Seattle (2) is a brown geldinsr by Prince Se- 
attle, out. of Bessie L„ bv Montana Director. 

Lucv Seattle (2) is a bay filly by Prince Seattle, 
lout of Altnmont Maid, by Altamont 2:26. 

Bertie Seattle is a handsome bav two-vear-old fillv 
Iby Prince Seattle 2:25%. out of Zommetta. bv Zom- 
Ibro 2:11; second dam Bessie, by Blackwood Mam- 
Ibrino. 



A bay gelding trotter by Bonnie McK. (sire of 
Bonnie Antrim 2:12), is in the adjoining stall. 

Billiken (3), by Prince Seattle 2:25%, out of Zom- 
metta, by Zombro 2:11, is in another. 

Prince Seattle 2:25%, by Stam B. 2:11%, dam Ber- 
tie (dam of Bertina 2:16%), by Piedmont 2:17%; 
second dam Bijou, by Electioneer. He is a fine look- 
ing stallion, and from the appearance and speed of 
his progeny will achieve quite a reputation as a sire. 

Mr. Bailey has Dr. Monday (trial) 2:27%, by Zom- 
bro 2:11, out of a mare by Altamont 2:26, that will 
get a low record under Mr. Bryant's tutelage this 
year. 

In the next stall is Waverley B. 2:23%, by Tidal 
Wave 2:06%, out of Bessie L. He is a slick going 
pacer, but this is no record for him; he will be in 
the 2:10 class before 1913. 

Irma Direct is a six-year-old brown mare which Mr. 
Bailey recently purchased. She is by Robert Direct, 
and has a world of speed. For a time after being 
brought to this track she did not do well, but is now 
"rounding to." and will be ready to score for the 
word when the bell rings. 

Bon Guy 2:11%, the wonderful three-year-old that 
electrified horsemen in 1910, is here, and his trainer, 
Mr. Bryant, is quite proud of him. This son of Bon 
Voyage 2:08 and Daphne McKinney (dam cf Frank 
N. 2:07%). by McKinney 2:11%, is not to be bred 
this season, but will receive a thorough training and 
be a factor in the 2:10 class races. 

Thomas Ronan is one of the most remarkable men 
of his age on the Pacific Coast. He is approaching 
the allotted four-score years, but age does not affect 
bis love for a good horse. He came to Washington 
Territory from his birthplace in Canada when a com- 
paratively young man, and braved all the perils of 
frontier life. Possessing a strong constitution and 
being enterprising and very industrious, he carved a 
fortune out of the wilderness, and when the oppor- 
tunity presented itself to gratify his love for horses, 
he visited Kentucky and purchased a number of 
grandly bred stallions and mares to stock a farm he 
had selected near Dayton, Washington. Some years 
ago he decided to come to Pleasanton, where the 
climate was more genial and where he could drive 
his horses throughout the long winter months. He 
bought this track, and after making many improve- 
ments thereon sold it to Mr. H. E. Armstrong, the 
present owner. 

Mr. Ronan is remarkably well versed in the pedi- 
grees of our leading trotting horse families, and was 
one of the first men to champion the now famous 
Jay Bird, and purchase some of the descendants of 
this horse. He has gradually disposed of all but 
these, and every clear day he may be seen driving 
them on this track. He has a nice, compactly-made 
four-year-old filly called Emily, by Birdman (son of 
Antrim 5918), dam Myrtle, by Arronax, he by Wil- 
liam L., out of Stokesie. by Geo. Wilkes 2:22. 

Blushing Maid is the pretty name of a sweet- 
gaited three-year-old roan filly by San Francisco 
2:07%, out of Birdie (dam of Bodaker 2:13, Birdman, 
etc.). by Jay Bird. 

Galileo is a three-year-old gelding by Birdman, out 
of Myrtle, by Arronax; he is a full brother to Emily. 

Joy Bird is another two-year-old which, like all of 
Mr. Ronan's horses, is a remarkably pure-gaited trot- 
ter; he is by Birdman (brother to Bodaker 2:13), out 
of Joyful, by Alexis; second dam Gillia, by Meredith 
1368. 

Soreta is. without doubt, the best bred one he has; 
she is by San Francisco 2:07%, out of Burned Side, 
by Arronax; second dam Birdie, by Jay Bird, and if 
ever there was the "makings" of a 2:15 trotter, 
Soreta is the one. 

He has a five-year-old bay mare called Matilda, by 
Birdman, dam Myrtle, by Arronax, that can step as 
fast as any green mare at Pleasanton. This horse 
Birdman was sired by Antrim (son of Aberdeen 27, 
and Hyanna, by Hylas 831), and his dam was Birdie, 
by Jay Bird; second dam Lady Lyle (dam of 1 trot- 
ter and 1 pacer), by George Wilkes; third dam Dame 
Tansy (dam of 3 and grandam of Butterfly 2:19%. 
Eagle Bird 2:21, and 2 others in 2:30), by Daniel 
Lambert; fourth dam Quarter (dam of Bay Star 
11267). There are very few stouter trotting bred 
stallions in California than th's horse and his brother. 
Bodaker 2:13, and both should prove to be sires of 
good game trotters. 

H. Busing is driving a very handsome bay two- 
year-old pacing stallion called West Pointer, by Star 
Pointer 1:59%, out of Sweet Hallie, by American Hal. 
This was the last colt the champion sired before 
leaving California, and many who have watched him 
pace claim he will be the best. Mr. Busing has made 
arrangements to breed the dam of this colt to that 
remarkably fast and game performer, Vernon Mc- 
Kinney 2:02, this spring. 

Fred Chadbourne has only a few so far this season, 
but in about two weeks he and his father-in-law, 
James Sutherland, will have all their box stalls filled. 
Aerolite 2:07% never looked, felt, or acted better 
than he does to-day, and it would not surprise his 
most ardent admirers — and they are legion — to see 
him get a record of 2:03 or better this year. 

Frank N. 2:07%, the fine big Wm. Harold pacer, 
is taking life easy, but will soon be seen in the 
shafts jogging in his work preparatory to the racing 
season. He is sound as a new milled dollar and has 
a "world of speed." 

Fred is handling a three-year-old gelding by C. The 
Limit 2:04%, out of Rosie Woodburn, for C. L. Crel- 
lin, and is more than pleased with his progress. 

He has a very nice mare called Roseline 2:24%, 
by Packline, which belongs to Z. T. Stahl, of Lewis- 
ton, Idaho. 

As usual, this trainer always has a few "babies" to 
break in, and this year he has a trio of extra good 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



ones. The first is by Alconda Jay, out of La Mosco- 
vita (dam of Bon Guy 2:11% and Frank N. 2:07%). 
This belongs to Win. T. McBride, proprietor of Pleas- 
anton's leading hotel, "The Rose." The others be- 
long to a Mr. Campbell, of Vancouver, B. C. One is 
Bon Cress, by Bon Voyage 2:08, out of a mare by 
Cresceus 2:02%, grandam Silpan, by Silver Bow 2:16. 
There's a double Robt. McGregor cross in this one. 
The other is an Alconda Jay, out of a Silver Bow 
mare. 

H. E. Armstrong, owner of this track, has decided 
to fit his small but select string of horses for the big 
Pacific Coast Circuit this year. It is headed by Kid 
Wilkes 2:09%, that remarkably game trotter by 
Stanton Wilkes 2:10%, son of Guy Wilkes 2:15%. In 
the next stall is Cora 2:0S%, by Del Coronado 2:09%. 
She is looking fat and fit for conditioning for the 
races. 

Hal J. is a five-year-old pacing gelding by Hal B. 
2:04%, out of a mare by Del Norte 2:08, that is doing 
nicely. 

Golden Mane is a handsome trotting gelding that 
was timed a mile in 2:16 last season. He is by Kin- 
ney Lou 2:07%, out of Floradora, by a son of Stein- 
way 2:25%. 

"Farmer" Bunch is also here, and, as usual, has 
all he can do. He has been at the Stockton track all 
summer, but thinks Pleasanton is a good place to 
"hibernate" through the winter. 

He has that good free-legged pacer T. D. W. 2:13%, 
trial 2:07%. He is only six years old and one of the 
sweetest pacers cne could wish to see. Needs neither 
boots nor straps. 

In the next stall he has an unnamed trotting five- 
year-old gelding by Strath way 2:19, out of Elsie 
Downs, by Boodle 2:12. This old mare (the dam of 
this one) won a race under saddle a few months ago 
in Auckland, New Zealand. 

Jim Rea III is the name of one of the best formed 
two-year-old pacing colts seen at Pleasanton. He 
belongs to Jim Rea III, of San Jose, and is bred to 
go all day. He was sired by Nearest McKinney 
2:13%, out of Much Better 2:07%, by Chas. Derby 
2:20, and is entered in all the Futurities on the 
Pacific Coast. If he does not win there will be a 
number of badly disappointed admirers wondering 
what happened him. He is a far better made colt 
than his full brother, One Better (2) 2:24%, now in 
the R. J. MacKenzie stable. 

Star Searcher is the appropriate name for a good- 
looking two-year-old pacer that "Farmer" Bunch is 
developing for his owner, Louis Wagner, of Stockton. 
Star Searcher was sired by Star Pointer 1:59%, out 
of a mare by Searchlight 2:03%. 

This trainer also has Wm. Hendrickson's three 
trotters, Tom Hendricks, Jim Hendricks, and Mary 
Hendricks, that were described in our last week's 
issue. 

Louis Joseph is a new man here. He hails from 
Stockton and has some cracking good ones in his 
string; so good, in fact, it is difficult to say which 
is the best. One is a coal black colt, full brother to 
Vernon McKinney 2:02, the star of the MacKenzie 
stable in 1911, and he is a pure, resolute-going pacer. 
In the adjoining stall is another full brother, a chest- 
nut in color, three years old, that is one of the finest 
gaited trotters on the track; he never paced a step 
in his life. 

Gilbert B. is the name of a big, ragged-hipped, 
strong-made pacer by Slippery Jim (a son of Guy 
Wilkes 2:15%), out of a mare by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16%. Gilbert B. wears the hopples, but he can 
move like a steam engine. He will be raced this 
year. These belong to Mr. Gilbert Baker, of Oak- 
dale, the breeder of Vernon McKinney 2:02. 

Mr. Joseph is also handling a good-looking four- 
year-old dark bay trotter by Educator, out of Miss 
Joseph, by Derby Ash, and when the bell rings he 
will be ready for the word. He is a good one. 

E. Rail has the Sacramento Valley Stock Farm 
trotters here, headed by Dillcara, the choicest bred 
Sidney Dillon in California. This horse has grown 
and filled out wonderfully. When in shape there is 
no doubt he is entitled to be called one of the hand- 
somest horses in this State. Mr. Rail has several 
colts by him, and, when the track becomes dry, 
many will be astonished by the natural speed they 
can show. Dillcara should be patronized by owners 
of good mares, for there is no doubt he will sire 
speed. His full brother, Harold Dillon, that is fully 
a hand smaller, is conceded to be one of the best 
sires for his opportunities ever landed in New Zea- 
land, but, as an individual, he does not class with 
this one. 

Chas. Whitehead, the quiet, genial trainer who 
met with such marked success at Salinas, has a 
three-year-old gelding by Oro Guy that acts as though 
he will be fit to take to the races this season. 

In the next stall is a well-made, nicely-proportioned 
son of Bon Voyage 2:08 and that great broodmare 
Carrie Malone, full sister to Chas. Derby 2:20. He 
was bred to a few mares in Salinas and the owners 
claim the colts are better looking than any they have 
seen by other sires. When it comes to blood-lines, 
Clear Voyage compares very favorably with any son 
of the great Bon Voyage. He has trotted eighths in 
16 seconds with very little work and will be given a 
record this season. 

Snisky is the peculiar name of a very toppy, stylish, 
pure-gaited trotting mare by Delphi 2:12%, out of 
Nina B. (full sister to Helena 2:11%, etc.), by Elec- 
tioneer. What a roadster she will make even if she 
is never raced! No boots nor toe weights, has a fine, 
clean, open gait, and trots apparently without any 
undue effort. 

There is another here, a colt called California 
Mack. He was sired by McKena, out of a McKinney 
mare, a little inbred, but very promising, and be- 
longs to Wm. Irvine, of Sacramento. 



H. G. Smith is another of our reinsmen who likes 
Pleasanton. He also has his horses looking well. 
Col. Kilmonio is the first one I saw. He is owned 
by Cel. Killingsworth, of Vacaville, and was sired by 
Demonio 2:11%, out of Sister, by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16%. He is seven years old and a pacer. 

In the next stall was a speedy bred three-year-old 
filly by Star Pointer 1:59%, dam by Bonnie Direct 
2:05%; second clam by Searchlight 2:03%; third dam 
Zeta Carter, by Director 2:17; fourth dam Lida W. 
2:18 (dam of Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, etc.). She 
belongs to H. Buchenau, of Berenda, Madera county, 
and, as one would surmise from reading her pedi- 
gree, she is a pacer and a very promising one. 

Mr. Smith has a filly called Dramonia, by Demonio 
2:11%, out of Olita, by Bradtmoor, and a very hand- 
some chestnut colt by Demonio 2:11%, out of Nettie 
T., by Dawn 2:1S%; second dam Mercedes (thorough- 
bred), by Imported Young Prince, then this pedigree 
runs back twenty-two dams and includes some of the 
greatest sires and dams in the American and English 
stud books. This colt is a pacer, and, if there is any 
virtue in "thoroughbred in the pacer," he should be 
as good as any ever foaled. 

In the adjoining stall is a four-year-old trotter by 
that, grandly bred trotting stallion Palite, out of a 
mare by Don Marvin. 

Messrs. Hazzard and Silva have that phenomenally 
last pacer Del Rey at this track and will undoubt- 
edly start him in the races this year. He will be a 
money-winner in all the events he is eligible for, and 
that is from the green class down to 2:05. This 
horse is to receive a thorough preparation for the 
campaign. 

Charles James, the trainer who made such a splen- 
did record last season, is not working his horses 
much. He is one of those trainers who can curb his 
impatience and wait. His long experience in this 
game has enabled him to have his horses "just on 
edge" when the bell rings, and not have them trot- 
ting and pacing for imaginary purses during the 
months of May and June. He will have a nice string 
of money-winners out this season. Dicto, the latest 
addition to his stable, is one that makes him feel 
that there will be few races advertised in which 
Dicto will not be the first name to be seen in the 
summaries. Mr. James is a very kind, careful, sober, 
industrious trainer, and a man with these qualifica- 
tions, combined with a thorough knowledge of the 
business, is sure to succeed. 

Mr Henry, formerly of Stockton, has a filly by 
Charley D. 2:06%, out of Beretta 2:22% (full sister 
to C. The Limit 2:04%)), that will make her sire 
more famous still, for she is a good one in every 
sense of the word. 

He also has for the same owner, R. S. Irvine, of 
Stockton, a handsome Alconda Jay filly out of La 
Moscovita (dam of Bon Guy 2:11% and Frank N. 
2:07%), that is the best Alconda Jay filly I have seen. 
She ought to be, for her dam is one of the best bred 
mares in the country. 

Will Guthrie is the name of the fastest in Mr. 
Henry's string. He is a big, strong, rugged-made 
pacer that has no mark, yet he has paced miles in 
2:10%. He is a free-legged, smooth-gaited side- 
wheeler. 

Dick Wilson was away from Pleasanton last Sat- 
urday. He left on the Friday night train for Sa- 
linas, where he was to get two good trotters to add 
to his string, which consists of Lucille Wilson, a 
green trotter. She was sired by The Patchen Boy 
(3) 2:10%, and is very promising. 

Youlynn, in the next stall, was all that was said 
of him in our Holiday Number, and more. He is one 
of the most perfect-made trotters I have seen in 
a long time, and if he does not get a low record I 
will be as much disappointed as the owner. He is 
by G. Albert Mac, out of Belle Lynn, by Diablo 2:09%. 
Just watch and see what speedy and game young- 
sters will come from these Diablo mares hereafter. 

Rubylight 2:11%, the' good money-winning two and 
three-year-old pacer, has grown and filled out well 
since her last arduous campaign, and is as sound as 
when she was foaled. This shows that Dick Wilson 
knows his business. 

In the next stall is one of the handsomest two-year- 
old stallions on this track. He is a pacer, and his 
sire was Hedgwood Boy 2:01 and his dam was Lady 
Patchen 2:29%, by The Patehon Boy (3) 2:10%; 
second dam Vcn Posey (dam of The Beauty Patchen 
2:24%, Western Horseman 2:24%, sire of 5, and Lady 
Patchen 2:29%), by Russia 3675; third dam Molly 
Friel, by Jim Monroe 835. This is one of the best 
limbed colts of his age here and promises to be very 
fast. How fast he has shown, only his famous owner 
and trainer knows. 

Next week I will give the list of the balances of 
the horses here, as space forbids in this issue. 

A movement has been started in Kentucky to have 
a bill introduced in the General Assembly delegating 
to the State Racing Commission the right to appoint 
inspectors of the mutuel machines at the various 
race tracks operating under license from the com- 
mission, the inspectors to be paid from a small as- 
sessment upon the tracks. The commission was 
created under an act passed by the Legislature of 
1906 and approved by Governor Beckham on March 
23, 1906, which since that time has not been amended. 
However, the mutuels have replaced the bookmakers 
since the law was enacted, and it is said several 
features of the statute could be strengthened by a 
comprehensive amendment. 



Last Monday Ted Hayes worked his two-year-old 
Zombowage a mile in 2:31 %, last half in 1:13%, last 
eighth in 17% seconds, over the Los Angeles track. 



PLAN HORSE SHOW IN 1915. 

Thanks to the genial California weather, equestrian 
sports have been just as popular this winter as at 
other seasons of the year, and last Sunday there 
were scores of riders out on their mounts, wending 
their way in among the hundreds of automobiles and 
adding to the picturesque effect of the holiday pleas- 
ure-seekers. Every horse at the Riding Club was 
out, considerable over a hundred, and merry little 
groups of riders were to be seen, attesting to the 
striking revival of the sport this winter, says the 
Examiner. 

The Pacific Coast Gaited Saddle Horse Association 
is doing much to further this sport through its efforts 
to promote the horse show that is to be one of the 
big leatures of the Panama-Pacific Fair in 1915. 
Naturally, to get up such an event and make it 
worthy of the country to be represented, the time 
intervening before the exposition is not a day too 
much for preparation. This is one of the reasons for 
the pronounced pcpularity of the saddle horse in and 
about San Francisco this winter. 

This organization announces a sweepstake prize of 
$6,000 with entries to close on April 1, 1912. The 
contest is to be between four and five-year-olds. It is 
expected that this number alone will have fifty or 
more entries, judging by the number that have al- 
ready been placed. Entries are expected to come 
not only from the Coast States, but from Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Missouri, and the other States famous 
for blue-blood stock, as well as from the Coast and 
Rocky Mountain States. 

Owners of gaited saddle horses in California are 
manifesting a spirited liveliness in this number, as 
is shown by the demand for the services of the 
old-time trainers as well as for the high prices being 
paid for saddle horses of this type. William T. Ses- 
non, of this city, is having his registered gaited sad- 
dle horse Moreno trained by W. A. Hunter at Wood- 
land. Walter F. Buck recently acquired a stylish 
three-year-old black mare which is being trained at 
Golden Gate Park. "Queen Louise" is her regis- 
tered name. She shows fine style and although 
trained for less than four months, can acquit herself 
in seven gaits handsomely. J. J. Gethin recently sold 
a handsome saddle mare to Miss Burke, of New 
York. The mare is trotting bred, able to do a mile 
in 2:30, but is tame and gentle enough for any 
woman to manage easily. Miss Dahl, one of the 
riders well known at the Riding Club, where she 
• usually leads in the Wednesday night ring exhibi- 
tions, also bought a good-looking black mare of the 
full-galted type which she rides every Sunday through 
the park and along the boulevards. 

It is most encouraging to lovers of the sport that 
such interest is being taken in the saddle horse, for 
it all indicates that California is coming right to the 
front, taking its grand old place in the lead, where 
it used to be in the days of Senator Stanford, the 
Haggins, and others of that school who took pride 
in developing equestrian sports to the highest degree 
back in the seventies. 

o 

A PRODUCING TROTTING MATRON. 



Young Miss, dam of the famous Bingen 2:06%, that 
was recently sold by A. W. Smith, of New York, to 
J. L. Smyser, of Louisville, Ky., has had thirteen 
foals, as follows: 

I899 b f, Miss Lizzie S. (dam of Grancino 2:13 and 

George Brill 2:23%) by Bow Bells 2:19%. 
1893 — Br. c, Bingen 2:06% (sire of Uhlan 1:58%) by 

May King 2:20. 
1 894 — B f., Mrs. Young (dam of Kingsnower 2:22% 

and the pacers Our King 2:15% and King's Mantle 

219%), by Wilkes Boy 2:24%. 
1897 — B. c, Young King (sire of the pacer King's Idyl 

2:15%) by May King 2:20. 
1900 B. f.. Kinglyne (dam of Morgan Axworthy, sold 

for $4000) by Mav King 2:20. 
1901 — B. f., Lookout Queen by Lookout 2:22%. 
1903 — B. c. The Lookout 2:17%, by May King 2:20. 
1 904 — B. c. Golden Result by May King 2:20. 
1905 — B. f., Mistress Young by May King 2:20. 

1907 — B. c, Master Jim by Rlvelition 2:20%. 

1908— R. e., Jim Walnut (Bingen Hall 2:27%) by Wal- 
nut Hall 2:08%. 

1909 — B. c, Master Walnut (deformed) by Walnut 
Hall 2:08%. 

1910 — B. f.. Petrovnla by Peter the Great 2:07%. 
Young Miss was bred by A. Smith McCann, of Lex- 
ington, Ky., and was foaled in 1889. Her sire was 
Young Jim, by George Wilkes 2:22, and her dam. 
Miss Mambrino, was by Red Wilkes, another son of 
the head of the Wilkes family. Miss Mambrino was 
out of Miss Clark, by Alric, son of Almont 33, and 
she out of Kate, by Clark Chief. Mr. McCann sold 
Young Miss in 1892 to David Bennett, of Lexington. 
She was then in foal to May King 2:20, a son of 
Electioneer, and Bingen was foaled the property of 
Mr. Bennett, who is often, though mistakenly, re- 
ferred to as the breeder of this noted sire. Geo. W. 
Leavitt, of Boston. Mass., who purchased Bingen as 
n ycn-lini; ;mil sold him t<» K If Greeley, 61 Klls- 
worlh, Me., bought Young Miss when she began to 
show great promise and shortly afterward sold her 
to CharleB Whlttemore, of Boston. He, in turn, sold 
her about L904 to D. Comyn Moran, of New York, 
from whom Mr. Smith purchased her in 1909. At 
22 years of age, the producer of seven foals since 
1903, and still productive, having one of the greatest 
of breeding sires to her credit, Young Miss will over 
occupy a prominent place in breeding history.— 
Ilorso World 

GOOD run \\vriii\»; THAT NTBBDI * iii.istkh. 

Gombault's Cautlc Balsam Is all right for anything 
thai needs blistering. I u»ed it on spavins with «uc- 

ce8a ,_H. F. SIIKUMAN, Toledo, Wash. 

o - 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912'. 



I NOTES AND NEWS j 

Send in your stallion advertisements. 



Our Breeders' Number will be issued March 9th. 



Columbus, Ohio, will give two weeks racing and 
190,000 for purses. 



Guy Axworthy 2:08% will head the stud at Senator 
Bailey's Lexington (Ky.), stock farm. 



Quite a number of mares in Los Angeles have 
already been booked to Bon Voyage 2:08. 



A $10,000 trot and a $5,000 pace are proposed for 
Dallas, Tex., in connection with the State Fair. 



\V. L. Snow expects Zombrewer 2:04%, by Zombro, 
to pace close to the two-minute mark this season. 



A number of stallion advertisements were received 
just as we were going to press. They will be re- 
ferred to in our next issue. 



Gallinule, by Isonomy-Moorhen, sire of Pretty Polly, 
Wildflower, Lesterlin, and several other famous Eng- 
lish turf race-winners, is dead. 



W. A. Clark Jr. spends two days a week helping 
his trainer work his horses at Exposition Park, Los 
Angeles, and enjoys this sport very much. 



Directrome, a green six-year-old trotter, by Moor- 
mont, was recently purchased by Win. Higginbottom, 
and will be put in training this season. 



Wm. Higginbottom, the well-known livestock auc- 
tioneer, has just purchased the bay gelding Chiquita 
2:10, by Diablo 2:09%, from Lon Daniels of Chico. 



T. L. Freeland, a Kansas horseman, has a fast 
prospect in the two-year-old by Zombro 2:11, dam 
Mineola Chimes, dam of Prelatic 2:08%, by Chimes. 



Smiley Corbitt is the name of a very handsome 
Bon Voyage four-year-old gelding which his owner,* 
6. Christenson. of this city, drives through Golden 
Gate Park whenever the weather permits. 



Colorado E. (3) 2:04% by The Bondsman will be 
pointed for the world's stallion trotting record and 
there are a few good judges that believe he will 
wrest the honors from The Harvester 2:01. 



Everybody in San Jose who has a Bon McKinney 
colt, thinks he has the best colt in the world. This 
young stallion is very popular in San Jose and should 
have his book filled in a little while. 



Ted Hayes is breaking a seven-months-old colt in 
Los Angeles by Bon Voyage, out of Cecile M. by 
Robin, that the railbirds all say has more natural 
speed than any colt they ever saw. 



Will G. Durfee contemplates taking a string of 
horses East this year. It has been two years since 
he appeared on the Grand Circuit and, as he has 
some fine "prospects," no doubt he will do well with 
them. 



Madison Square Garden may not be torn down as 
originally intended. The Fasig-Tipton interests and 
others are preparing an offer that may give the 
historic building a new lease of life. 



Under Wm. J. Wilson's care the stallion The Bonds- 
man served sixty-nine mares in 1911 and only seven 
have been reported as "missed." This is a splendid 
showing and reflects credit upon this young man as 
a stud master. 



The annual meeting of stockholders of the Ameri- 
can Trotting Register Association will be held on 
February 7th at the Register office in Chicago. Ten 
directors, to serve three years, will be elected at this 
meeting. 



It is the duty of every stallion owner, standing a 
good light harness horse for public service, to make 
it a point to see that each of his patrons, nominates 
the foal in the local futurities. It is not only to his 
own advantage but to the mare owner and the busi- 
ness in general. 



Dan Hoffman bought the handsome trotting four- 
year-old Buster, by Tom Smith 2:13%, dam by Val- 
entine Boodle, and has every reason to be proud of 
him. Dan will have him ready when the racing 
season at the Stadium commences and will undoubt- 
edly make some of his rivals hustle to pass him. 



A meeting was held at San Jose last week at 
which officers were elected for a permanent organiz- 
ation of a Fair Association. The meeting was large 
and enthusiastic over the proposition of holding a 
county fair the coming season. Efforts will be made 
to have the annual pure food show, as well as the 
poultry and kennel associations, hold their exhibi- 
tions at the same time as the county fair. The 
following officers were elected: President, Henry 
W. Hoff; vice-president, E. W. Allen, and secretary, 
E. G. Jones. 



F. Gomett, of San ose, intends to sell all his 
trotting stock this spring with the exception of his 
handsome stallion Prince McKinney. Mr. Gomett 
has not been enjoying good health for the past year 
and finds that keeping a string of horses involves 
too much care and anxiety. 



John A. McKerron has been filling a large order 
for horse bcots for the MacKenzie horses, and Messrs. 
James and Spencer are delighted with the way every 
boot is made and fits. "There is no one in the East 
can come near Mr. McKerron in his line," is their 
opinion. 



The Tulare Board of Trade, together with the old 
agricultural association, has closed a deal for an 
aviation meet in Tulare, next month. The promoters 
hope to awaken sufficient interest in the fair grounds 
to rehabilitate the agricultural association and make 
it possible to hold again the county fairs for which 
Tulare was known for many years. 



That 1915 meeting will be a "hummer!" All the 
preliminaries are being arranged for the considera- 
tion of the Park Commissioners and the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition Commissioners. As a "drawing 
feature" it will be one of the greatest to be seen in 
1915. 



Gus Lindauer, of 122 Clara street, has just received 
three carloads of fine, large work horses for sale. 
He has recently added an addition to his building 
and has divided it into 125 stalls. This makes his 
place the largest and best ventilated in this city. 



It is announced that the managers of the New York 
State Fair Association have paid to the New York 
State Comptroller $53,739, which represents the 
profits of the Syracuse State Fair. The gross ex- 
penses of the fair were $88,325 and the gross receipts 
$142,064. 



The stallion Tidal Wave 2:06%, by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16%, out of My Miracle (sister to Coney 
2:02, etc.), by McKinney 2:11%, Mr. Bailey intends 
shipping to Oregon to make the season of 1912, as 
his progeny is so well thought of there and many 
horse breeders have requested that he be sent there. 



Mc Adrian 2:24, the grand-looking, heavily-muscled 
son of Guy McKinney, has never been bred to a stand- 
ard and registered trotting mare. He will have some 
sent to him this year, for any horseman who sees 
him will prefer him to many that have had far better 
opportunities and have yet to get a horse of the 
caliber of Bert Kelly. 



Attention is called to the advertisements in our 
business columns of some grandly-bred trotters and 
pacers, stallions, broodmares, colts and fillies. Seek- 
ers after the very best cannot do better than cor- 
respond with these advertisers. Every animal offered 
is as represented and the owners will be pleased to 
answer any questions regarding them. 



C. L. Gifford, owner of the great stallion Aerolite 
2:07%, says there were 36 mares bred to him last 
year at Moscow, Idaho. One is owned by Chas. W. 
Shields and her foal by this stallion is a beauty. This 
mare is called Louladi. She was sired by Antelope 
J6323 (son of Nutwood 2:18%), dam Lou by Del 
Norte 2:08, son of Altamont 2:26. 



Eighty polo ponies, valued at approximately $25,000, 
were shipped from Coronado in special cars to Pasa- 
dena last Wednesday. Two carloads of special equip- 
ment to be used by the titled English players and the 
Coronado team at the coming tournament were in- 
cluded in the shipment. This is the most valuable 
shipment of polo ponies ever carried by the Santa Fe 
In California. 



Symbernal (l),by Symboleer (p) 2:09%, dam Fancy 
P. 2:22%, own sister to Charm P. 2:10, has arrived 
in the hands of E. S. Knowlton, of Vancouver, B. C, 
who purchased him from the Chicaskia Stock Farm, 
Blackwell, Okla., last August at a fairly long price. 
He arrived in Vancouver January 6th and is a much 
admired youngster. 



Katalina 2:11%, by Tom Smith 2:13%, has the 
handsomest colt ever seen in Butte county; it came 
January 24th at Chico, and is the first one of The 
Bondsman's progeny in California. "If all The Bonds- 
man's are like this one he ought to have his book 
filled in thirty days," was the remark of a well- 
known horseman. She belongs to Wendell Miller, 
of Chico. 



Chas. L. De Ryder is negotiating for a piece of 
pasture land (over ninety acres) about a mile from 
Pleasanton, where he can care for the mares sent 
him to be bred to The Bondsman and The Patchen 
Boy 2:10% this season. He is noted for the excel- 
lent care he takes of all mares, as everyone who bred 
to Star Pointer 1:59%, when he had him, can affirm. 



Mr. Stallion Owner, place yourself in the position 
of the owner of a well bred mare; one that should 
produce a good speed prospect. Would you want to 
breed to some unknown stallion that had never been 
advertised and was not known outside of the county 
in which he was owned? No, you would go to the 
horse that was well known by advertising, so that 
the colt would be more valuable. Some mare own- 
ers are thinking the same way about your stallion 
standing for public service. 



John Sawyer is in charge of Hal B. 2:04% and all 
the other horses that G. A. Westgate bought from 
Paul Wessinger. The horses are quartered at the 
Portland track, and are being put in sale condition. 
Hal B. never looked better in his life. He and all 
the others, except the mares and young colts, are 
being jcgged every day. All of them will be sold 
under the hammer at the spring sale. 



The following mares have already been booked to 
The Bondsman: Simmone by Simmons 2:28; Perza 
(dam of Enchantress 2:29%), by Allie Wilkes 2:15; 
Seville S., by Strathway 2:19; Rosemary, by Raymon, 
and Reina Directum, trial 2:10%, by Rey Direct 2:10. 
Since Mr. De Ryder has had this horse he has had 
inquiries from several owners. Out of sixty-nine 
mares bred to The Bondsman in 1911 only seven 
missed. This is a splendid percentage. 



Information has just been received of the death of 
George Campbell Brown by suicide, which occurred 
at Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday. Mr. Brown was one 
of the best-known breeders and horsemen in America, 
and was widely respected for his ability and char- 
acter. He was the proprietor of Ewell Farm, home 
of John R. Gentry 2:00%, a noted breeding estab- 
lishment, and a former member of the Board of 
Review of the National Trotting Association. D] 
health is assigned as the cause of the rash act. 



Charley Marley, of Woodland, has sold his fine-bred 
stallion, Sir Poleon, registered No. 52,065, to H. B. 
Smith, of Ukiah, Mendocino county. Marley started 
Sir Poleon in five matinee races and won four, giving 
him a matinee record of 2:23 as a two-year-old. Sir 
Poleon was sired by Nushagak, sire of Aristo 2:08%, 
Nada 2:09%, dam Anselios, dam of Nusta 2:23%, by 
Prince Ansel, record 2:20. Smith intends to head 
his stock farm with Sir Poleon this year and then 
race him. 



John E. Madden, the noted Kentucky breeder and 
master of Hamburg Place, warmed the feet and glad- 
dened the hearts of a number of the poor of Lexing- 
ton, Ky., a few days ago. In driving past the head- 
quarters of the Associated Charities, he observed a 
throng of the poor waiting for food and raiment. He 
was impressed with the wretchedness of their foot 
covering and forthwith went to a store and bought 
200 pairs of shoes and stockings, which were distrib- 
uted among the needy. 



Wm. G. Durfee is going to sell twenty-four head of 
trotting stock at Los Angeles soon. There are among 
these some of the finest bred stallions, broodmares, 
colts and fillies ever gathered in Southern California. 
They are all sound and good looking, and will be val- 
uable acquisitions for anyone. Mr. Durfee is not 
only an excellent practical horseman, but is also 
one of the best students of the horse-breeding prob- 
lem in the United States. 



Mr. R. J. MacKenzie has added another good trot- 
ter to his string of fast ones at Pleasanton by pur- 
chasing the handsome black stallion El Zombro, by 
Zombro 2:11, out of The Bouquet, by Nushagak 25939 
(son of Sable Wilkes 2:18 and Fidelia, dam of two, 
by Director 2:17), dam Woodflower (dam of Seylex 
2:15% and Prince Ansel (2) 2:20%), by Ansel 2:20, 
son of Electioneer 125; second dam the great brood- 
mare Mayflower 2:30% (dam of 2 and 6 speed-produc- 
ing danughters), by St. Clair 16675. Alex. Brown, of 
Woodland bred this one and sold him to Mr. Mac- 
Kenzie last week. 



Those Tcomey carts for $60 and racing sulkies for 
$80 (Toomey and Frazier makes) at Studebaker's, 
are the best value for the money ever offered in 
California. An immense assortment to select from, 
and no better ones were ever made. They are selling 
for just 40 per cent lower than they were a year ago. 
The season is approaching when these must be in 
demand and horsemen should take no chances of 
being killed in old sulkies when they can purchase 
these for that low figure while they last. Stude- 
bakers' is at the corner of Fremont and Mission 
streets, San Francisco. 



Geo. D. Haggy, of Burns, Ore., is much pleased with 
the manner in which the colts by his stallion Pro- 
gress by Diablo 2:09%, are coming on. They are 
showing lots of natural speed. Sidney Wilkes 
2:24%. by Marvin Wilkes, now in Australia, owned 
by Claude McGhee, is wintering well and will be 
out for the money next year. Trainer Johnson is 
located at the track with five head. Of these he is 
particularly pleased with the bay gelding called 
Bill Hanly, which showed him miles in 2:12 last 
year. 



Alexander B. Coxe, of Paoli, Pa., has named eight- 
een mares in foal to Colorado E., Del Coronado, 
Montalvo, Prince McKinney, and Toddles, in the 
Horseman and Spirit of Times' $20,000 futurity for 
foals of 1912. There are some California mares 
among them. The list includes A Leading Lady 
2:07, Bertha C. 2:10%, Bisa 2:10%, Czarevna 2:07%, 
Erirange 2:21, Jane Jones 2:14%, Lady Brussels, 
Little Sweetheart 2:12%, Muda Guy 2:09, Ruth Mary, 
Sally Lunn 2:15%, The American Bell 2:12%, and 
Twenty-Third, by Director, all bred to Colorado E. 
Those in foal to Del Coronado 2:09% are Ettie L. 
2:12% and Rena del Diablo, by Diablo; to Montalvo 
2:25%, Tuna 2:0S%, by Jas. Madison; to Prince Mc- 
Kinney, Nelda Worthy 2:22, by Axworthy 2:15%, and 
to Toddles (3) 2:18%, Hazel Kinney 2:09%, by Mc- 
Kinney, and Miss Griffith 2:14%, by Bonnie Direct. 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



The grand stand and paddock of the Santa Anita 
race track, near Arcadia, was totally destroyed by 
fire which started at 9:30 o'clock Wednesday night, 
presumably caused by tramps. The cost of the two 
structures when built five years ago was $75,000. 
There is said to be $25,000 insurance. The plant is 
owned by the racing association of which "Lucky" 
Baldwin, before his death, was the moving spirit, and 
it was largely through his efforts that it was built. 
Other stockholders are George Rose, of San Fran- 
cisco, John Brink, of Lcs Angeles, and H. A. Unruh, 
manager of the Baldwin estate, who recently pur- 
chased the interests of C. M. Holland, of New York, 
and Barney Schreiber, of St. Louis. 



There is a stallion in Los Angeles which Will 
Durfee has that for breeding and individuality 
would be hard to equal in any country. He is 
called Wilkes Boy Jr. 38958, and was sired by Wilkes 
Boy 2:24%, out of Carna Belle (by Liberty Bell 
(he by Bell Boy 2:19%, out of Prefix by Pancoast, 
etc.), dam Carna (dam of Aurita 2:25%, Carnation 
2:26% and Axewood, sire of 3 in the list), by Nut- 
wood 2:18%; third dam Candace (dam of Albert 
Lee 2:26, a sire), by Harold; fourth dam Fairy 
Belle (dam of Xymphia 2:26%, Fairy Gift 2:30 and 3 
sires), by Belmont 64; filth dam Waterwitch, one 
of Pilot Jr.'s greatest speed producing daughters, 
dam of 6 and the dams of 20 in 2:30 list. He can 
show 2:10 speed. Mr. Durfee says he is for sale, as 
he has so many others he must sell some, even at a 
sacrifice. 



Bert Kelly, the big, fine-looking trotting gelding in 
R. J. MacKenzie's string, is bred to "go the route." 
He has a public trial of 2:11%, but has shown much 
greater speed. His sire was the well-bred horse 
McAdrian 2:24, son of Guy McKinney (he by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%, out of Flossie D., by Guy Wilkes 
2:15%; grandam Blanche Ward, dam of China Maid 
2:05%, by Onward 2:25%) and Maple Leaf, by Adrian 
2:26%; second dam Ollie Ray 2:39%, dam Acclama- 
tion 2:24%, by Reliance 2:22%; third dam Mary 
Blaine, by Signal 3327. Bert Kelly's dam was by 
Mountain Boy 4841, son of Kentucky Prince and Elise 
(sister to Elaine 2:20, etc.), by Messenger Duroc; 
grandam Green Mountain Maid (.dam of Electioneer 
125, etc.), by Harry Clay 45. Bert Kelly's grandam 
was the great four-mile race horse Joe Daniels. He 
was the first colt McAdrian sired. The latter was 
twenty-two months old at the time he was bred to 
the Mountain Boy mare. 



A French writer on turf topics in a recent review 
of the racing situation states: "Notwithstanding all 
the efforts that have been made to encourage horse- 
breeding in France, it is surprising to learn that 
there is still the prospect of a shortage of horses for 
military purposes. Thirteen years ago on annual 
credit of $5,240,000 was considered sufficient for re- 
mounts; but this has since been considerably in- 
creased, and the government is to be asked next 
year to provide $9,000,000 for the purpose of im- 
proving the quality and quantity of cavalry mounts. 
Horses are still being brought from Ireland and 
other countries, as many of the French farmers do 
not find it sufficiently profitable to keep mares and 
maintain their produce for four years, notwithstand- 
ing the advantages offered to them by the govern- 
ment in the matter of stallions.. It is the aim of the 
minister of agriculture to have all horses for the 
French Army bred in France, and so make the army 
independent of outside assistance in case of war. 



Kentucky horsemen have evolved a plan whereby 
the fair associaticns of that State may benefit from 
the license fee charged for using a stallion in the 
stud within the State limits. In that State the 
owner of any stallion standing for service is required 
to pay in addition to taxes on the animal the amount 
of one service fee as an annual license. A commit- 
tee of horsemen, of which Mat. S. Cohen, of Lexing- 
ton, is chairman, has drafted a bill that is intended 
to put this money back into the h".nds of horsemen 
and farmers, and it will be presented soon to the 
Legislature for enactment. The bill stipulates that 
all such money collected by the county clerks shall 
be paid over annually to the county fair associations, 
to be distributed as premiums lor horses of the 
various breeds. In the event of there being no 
county fair, the money collected in such counties 
shall be paid to the State fair association. The 
license fees in Fayette county alone, it is said, will 
run into the thousands of dollars annually. 



Old Messenger was an English blood-horse, a son 
of Mambrino, a direct descendant of Flying Childers 
— the swiftest horse ever known — and his mother 
was a transplanted child of the desert through the 
Darley Arabian. He was a gray, 15.3 hands high, and 
won many running races when a colt. But his color 
was not popular among thoroughbreds. His natural 
gait was not a lope, but a trot. Led behind a gig, 
he could trot faster than any harness horse in Eng- 
land could run. He was imported to America and 
became the founder of the Hambletonian strain of 
horses. There had been the Narraganset pacers and 
some fair trotting horses before him, but all the 
steppers, while having the natural trotting stride, 
lacked the endurance, the level head and the irre- 
pressible courage necessary for a race to the extreme 
limit of endurance, until the needed attributes were 
supplied by the indomitable Messenger blood. He 
left a progeny that carried on the race he founded, 
for nine generations until his name and race became 
the most famous among horses. 



A meeting of the committee appointed from the 
board of directors of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association and the Park Amateur Driving 
Club was held at the office of the P. C. T. H. B. A., 
Monday evening to discuss plans for the big race 
meeting to be held on the Stadium track in 1915 
during the Panama-Pacific Exposition. The project 
has been enthusiastically received wherever it has 
been broached, and it is expected that the big purses 
which will be offered will bring to California that year 
horses not only from all over the United States, but 
foreign countries as well, and that the meeting will 
be the biggest light harness horse race meeting ever 
held. 



The sensational horse of 1883 was Director, who 
went through the campaign unbeaten, earning a rec- 
ord of 2:17, and winding up his season's frolic by 
winning the Charter Oak $10,000 stake the year that 
famous stake was opened. Early in the spring when 
the horses were in training in California, Director 
looked very cheap in comparison with the stallion 
Romero. At that time the world's record for trotting 
stallions was 2:15%, made by Smuggler over the 
Glenville track. Romero had shown a mile in 2:16, 
last half in 1:03, to high wheels that spring, and 
Monroe Salisbury thought him the greatest stallion 
that ever lived. When it came to make the stake 
entries Johnny Goldsmith insisted upon coupling 
Director's name with that of Romero. Goldsmith had 
confidence in Director and it was well that he did, 
as Romero went wrong and the victories without 
interruption of Director not only established a family 
of horses, Direct and Directum, but it made Monroe 
Salisbury a great owner and Johnny Goldsmith a 
great driver. Since that time there have been many 
cases very similar to that of Romero. The one that 
is freshest in the minds of horsemen is that of Joe 
Patchen II, the fleet pacer owned by R. J. McKenzie, 
and which worked a mile in 2:02% over the Indian- 
apolis track early last summer. Joe Patchen II met 
with an accident shortly afterward and did not get 
to the races. The year that C. K. G. Billings bought 
Blacklcck 2:04%, the black horse had created a 
furore by working a mile at Libertyville, of 2:04%, 
late in June. Blacklock got to the races, but was a 
failure. — Cleveland Leader. 

o 

BON VOYAGE 2:08 AND HIS SON. 



When Palo Alto, the home of sires of early and 
extreme speed, closed its gates, many predicted there 
would never be any more stallions that would create 
such a furore in the light harness world as those 
which made this great farm and its greater owner 
famous. That was a mistake. There came to this 
Coast a stallion selected and raced by Charles Mar- 
vin, "the speedmaker of Palo Alto," which if he had 
the opportunities many of those Palo Alto stallions 
had, would have surpassed them. Mr. Marvin 
claimed he was the best going, most level headed, 
best limbed, and most promising two-year-old he ever 
drove, and that in itself was a great recommendation. 
To prove his assertions true, he gave him a mark of 
2:15 at that age, and the following year lowered it 
to 2:12%, gaining the champion records in 1904 and 
1905, and making him the largest money winner of 
those years. He sold him to W. A. Clark Jr., a keen 
judge of trotters, for $10,000, and the stallion was 
sent to California, where he has transmitted his 
qualities to his progeny with a uniformity that is 
unparalleled. His advertisement appears in this is- 
sue, and, "as facts and figures talk," nothing more 
may be said. There might have been added to this 
advertisement, however, that Bon Voyage colts are 
deemed invaluable by their owners and are not for 
sale. 

Mr. Ted Hayes, who has fiim in charge at Los 
Angeles, is also the trainer who so successfully pre- 
pared and trained him for his campaign in 1911 and 
drove him the fastest heat by a trotting stallion ever 
made in a race in California, and believes that in 
1912 he can even lower that record. He has also a 
son of his, worthy of that honor, which he will also 
make a season with, and that one is Bon Volonte 
(3) 2:19%, out of Missie Medium, a great brood- 
mare; second dam Belle Medium 2:20 (dam of Stam 
B. 2:11%, etc.), by Happy Medium (dam of Nancy 
Hanks 2:04, etc.). 

DE RYDER LEASES CAPT. McCAN'S HORSES. 

Last week. Captain C. P. McCan transferred the 
horses he has at Pleasanton from the care of Wm. J. 
Wilson to Chas. L. De Ryder, the latter taking them 
on a lease. In this transaction the great stallions, 
The Bondsman and The Director General, are in- 
cluded, besides the Belgian prize-winning stallion, 
Ouragon, the champion saddle stallion, and all the 
mares in training. Mr. De Ryder has had a long 
experience in the handling and care of stallions and 
broodmares and will use every effort to get mares 
consigned to the horses in his charge in foal. He is 
a liberal feeder and will see that they will want for 
nothing, not only giving them plenty of hay, but also 
a run on a ninety-acre pasture field he has leased. 
This is the field in which Lou Dillon 1:58% was 
kept and it is also the one in which all mares that 
were bred to Star Pointer 1:59%, the other cham- 
pion were pastured for three years. It lies about a 
mile and a quarter from Pleasanton on the Santa 
Rita road and is a well-sheltered place, with plenty 
of rich food throughout the summer. Mr. De Ryder 
intends to exploit the merits of these two stallions 
extensively and strive to get the best lot of mares 
possible for them, believing they are just the sires 
necessary to cross on those bred in California. 



THE FRED H. CHASE SALE. 



Mr. Geo. E. Stickle, of Lockeford, Cal., has been 
a buyer and breeder of high class trotting stock for 
years. He intended to have a string of horses trained 
and raced but his mining interests have assumed 
such large proportions he has been compelled to 
abandon his ideas about the light harness horse in- 
dustry and on Monday evening, February 12th, he 
will sell without reserve all of his trotters, including 
one of the handsomest four-year-old Bon Voyage 
stallions on this coast. He is out of the dam of 
Helen Stiles 2:08%. With this horse he will sell 
over forty choice broodmares by Stam B. 2:11%, 
Daedalion 2:08%, Diaulo 2:09%, Mount Vernon 2:15%, 
Silver Bow 2:16, Stickle and other standard sires, 
as well as three, four, and five-year-old geldings and 
fillies. They will be in perfect condition and seek- 
ers after the very choicest bred trotters and pacers 
will find just what they want at this sale. Among 
them is Angeline by Stickle (son of Silver Bow 2:16 
and Grace, dam of Daedalion 2:08%, Creole 2:15, 
etc., by Buccaneer. Stickle is the sire of Blanche T. 
2:19) out of a mare by Orator. Picture a black filly 
by Eblis (brother to Daedalion 2:08%) out of mare by 
Silver Bow 2:16. A bay mare called Mary S. by 
the same sire out of mare by Silver Bow 2:16; 
second dam Alaskia. Lulu, a bay mare by Stickle, 
out of a mare by Diablo 2:09%; second dam Queenie, 
a producing mare by Dexter Bradford. Tessie W. by 
Silver Bow 2:16, out of Vesper, by Prompter; Sa- 
vannah by Silver Bow 2:16, out of Grandma by Or- 
phan, that famous mare which the late Geo. H. Fox 
used to tell about. Edith, by Stickle, out of Savan- 
nah. Kate, by Jim Mulvenna, out of a mare by Ross 
S. 2:19%. Mamie S. by Eblis, out of Tessie W., by 
Silver Bow 2:16. Queen, by Diablo 2:09%, out of 
Queen (dam of Silver Light 2:18%), by Dexter Brad- 
ford. Fanny, by Stickle, out of a mare by Corbitt's 
Fair Boy; second dam by Apex 2:26. Susie H., by 
Eblis, out of a mare by Silver Bow 2:16; second dam 
Alaskia. San Toy by Stam B. 2:11%, out of Tessie 
W. by Silver Bow 2:16. Grace S. by Daedalion 
2:08%, out of Savannah, by Silver Bow 2:16. Gracie 
S. by Eblis, out of a mare by Silver Bow 2:16, and 
several other splendid mares. Besides these there 
are some very fine looking geldings fit for road or 
business purposes. Some excellent work and driving 
stock will also be sold. 

OFF TO LOS ANGELES. 



John McLeod, of Vancouver, B. C, will ship the 
following horses to Los Angeles: Belmar, a hand- 
some, young pacing stallion, by Moko, he is a full 
brother to Mabel 2:10%; Red McKinney, a three- 
year-old colt by Red Seal 2:10, dam by McKinney, 
second dam Wild May, by Electioneer; Rose Lecco, 
trial 2:16, by Lecco 2:09%, dam by McKinney; Albert 
D., a three-year-old pacing filly by C. The Limit 
2:04%, dam Bonner Belle 2:17, by Bonner N. B.; and 
Belle Wilkin 2:25%, by Zombro 2:11, dam Red Girl, 
dam of Panama Maid 2:14. 

In the same car goes the following horses owned 
by J. T. Wilkinson, Vancouver, B. C: A three-year- 
old pacing stallion by Kinney Lou 2:07%, this is a 
very promising colt; Hazel Wilkin, a brown pacing 
mare by Zombro 2:11, dam Hazel Kirke, by Alta- 
mont; Carlrea, a six-year-old pacing stallion by 
Carlokin 2:07%. There are also four grand-looking 
two-years-olds by Mr. Wilkinson's stallion Oro Wilkes 
Jr. 2:12%. All these horses will be trained at Los 
Angeles by Geo. McPherson, the man who developed 
Angus Pointer 2:01%, and other good campaigners. 
Mr. McPherson is now at Los Angeles, preparing 
quarters for his horses. 

o 

LIVERMORE HORSE SHOW. 

All airangements for the horse show, to be held at 
Livermnre, Saturday, February 17, have been com- 
pleted, and the various officers and committees have 
been named. The posters for the show are being 
sent out and distributed throughout the country. 
Every effort will be made to advertise the affair 
thoroughly. 

The following is the list of officers and commit- 
tees: 

H. M. Christenson, president; Max Berlin, vice- 
president; William McDonald, secretary; John Swee- 
ney, treasurer; David McDonald, grand marshal. 

Committee on subscriptions — Max Berlin, D. Mc- 
Donald, Jesse Young, H. M. Christenson and John 
Meyn. 

Committee on music— Max Berlin, D. McDonald 
and D. McNally. 

Committee on printing — William McDonald. 

Reception commitee— A. L. Henry, M. G. Callaghan, 
D. McNally, L. Schenone, Fred Werner and Peter 
Christenson. 

NORTH PACIFIC CIRCUIT DATES. 

At a meeting of the secretaries of the North Pa- 
cific Fair Association's circuit held last Thursday, 
dates for 1912 fairs were claimed as follows: 

Vancouver, B. C, August 1-17; Seattle, August 19-21, 
Portland, August 26-31; Salem, September 2-7; Van- 
couver, Wash., September 9-14; Walla Walla, Sep- 
tember 16-21; North Yakima, September 23-28; Spo- 
kane, September 30-October 5; Boise, October 7-12. 
A two-nation association was arranged, Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan, Alberta, Montana, Utah and Idaho be- 
ing included. 

The purses will aggregate $200,000 and the pro- 
gram provides for racing events for fifteen weeks. 
The board of stewards is to be composed of three 
members of the Canadian circuit, one from Manitoba 
and ono from Idaho. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912. 



| ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

X CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeW ITT. X 



BLACK TONGUE IN DOGS. 

A disease which is rather prevalent and often fatal 
in some sections, particularly the southern states, is 
given some attention in the American Journal of 
Veterinary Medicine by Edgar Heiny, of Hattiesburg, 
Miss.: 

Since coming to .Mississippi 1 have met with a dis- 
ease among dogs, known here as "sore mouth," or 
"black tongue," which has proven to be very fatal to 
dogs. Why it is called black tongue I have been 
unable to learn, as there is nothing in the symptoms 
of the disease that would induce one to call it that. 
The disease is very prevalent among dogs of Missis- 
sippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Georgia, and is very 
latal if not treated in its incipiency. 

Symptoms — The disease takes on the form of a 
stomatitis and seems to come on more often just 
after the dog has had a hard run and become heated. 
It begins with a loss of appetite, weakness and slob- 
bering. The buccal membrane and gums become 
inflamed. Throat also becomes inflamed and is sore. 
There is no papular or vesicular formation, the 
mucous membrane of gums and cheeks slough off 
without any ulcerative formation. The tongue does 
not become affected, or at least 1 have never seen it 
affected. The animal is usually more or less consti- 
pated. The eyes also become inflamed and discharge 
a great deal of rnuco-puriilent material. 

Treatment — The treatment that has proven most 
successful with me is to first administer a purgative, 
and cleanse the mouth thoroughly with a solution of 
copper sulphate and silver nitrate, also paint the nose 
and lips with a solution of silver nitrate. Apply this 
treatment about every four hours. Place animal in 
a dark, quiet place and withhold all food and water 
for at least five or six days. This treatment has 
proven fairly successful with me where I receive the 
patient within twenty-four hours after the first symp- 
toms have shown up. 

The disease seems to be infectious and yet I have 
seen dogs drink and eat with dogs affected with sore- 
mouth and not contract the disease. I can find noth- 
ing in textbooks concerning this disease and any 
information anyone can give me will be highly appre- 
ciated. 

The editor of the above named magazine states: 
Hlack-tongue or sore-mouth in dogs is quite prevalent 
in most of the southern states, from Virginia to 
Texas. Dr. John R. Mohler, chief of Division of Ani- 
mal Industry, replying to an inquiry concerning this 
disease, says: 

"In the south the term 'black-tongue' is generally 
applied to cases of dumb rabies, but in certain locali- 
ties the term is also used to designate a malignant 
form of necrotic stomatitis which is usually accom- 
panied by extensive bacterial intoxication. In sev- 
eral outbreaks of so-called 'black tongue' of the dog 
exhibiting severe necrotic stomatitis, we have suc- 
ceeded in incriminating the bacillus necrophorus as 
the causative agent. The description of the malady 
as noted in your letter resembles considerably that 
of 'canine typhus' or 'Stuttgart disease,' but since no 
definite causative agent or specific lesions have yet 
been observed, any infectious disease of the dog 
which is more or less fatal and presents all or most 
of the various manifestations present in the Stutt- 
gart disease may be considered as simulating that 
disease. In fact, the intestinal form of canine dis- 
temper plus stomatitis gives a clinical picture that 
resembles markedly the manifestation of the Stutt- 
gart disease." 

John F. Draughon of Nashville, Tenn., makes the 
following report, by request, to White & Plaskett, 
D. D. V. S., of his city: 

At the request of your Dr. Plaskett, I am sending 
you a written statement in regard to how I handle 
the disease commonly known by fox hunters in the 
south as ' black tongue." 

It is my understanding that many packs of hounds 
have been wiped out of existence in one season by 
this dreadful disease. Only a few days ago a friend 
of mine, from another county, was in Nashville, and 
told me he had lost his entire pack of dogs. I asked 
him what was the matter. He said somebody had 
poisoned them by giving them carbolic acid. I knew 
what that meant. 

I have experimented a great deal with this disease 
the past three years. The first year I lost several 
dogs, before I learned how to treat it and how to 
prevent its developing further in the kennel. 

The second year I lost one, and this year I have 
not lost any; but I have just handled one of the most 
stubborn cases that I have ever saved. 

And right here I want to say that it doesn't matter 
what kind of medicine is given, or how it is given, I 
don't believe it will save the dog in this condition 
unless equally as much attention is paid to feeding, 
watering, etc. 

As soon as I discover that one of my dogs has a 
case of black tongue, which is shown by saliva drip- 
ping from the dog's mouth and by irritated gums, I 
remove the sick dog from the kennel, and begin to 
feed the well dogs at least a tablespoonful of sulphur 
each day for several days. After a few days, I repeat 
the treatment. The sulphur seems to check the dis- 
ease to keep it from developing in the well dogs. 

It has now been more than four weeks since this 



case developed, and my dogs have never been in a 
healthier condition than at present. 

I gave the sick dog about three grains of calomel, 
one hour apart. Six hours later I gave him two to 
three tablespoonfuls of castor oil. 1 then gave him, 
in a little water, 40 drops of mangifera and GO drops 
of echinacea, alternately, three times a day. 

As you know, these remedies are from Lloyd 
FSrothers, Cincinnati, and are sold by but few drug- 
gists — druggists who handle medicine for the eclectic 
profession. 

I dissolved about ten cents' worth of boric acid in 
a pint of water and mopped the dog's mouth out twice 
a day, forcing him to swallow some of this boric acid, 
because I believe that in cases of this kind the intes- 
tines are affected exactly like the mouth. 

In treating the last dog I gave but little mangifera 
and echinacea but used a great deal of sulphur, per- 
haps from one to two tablespoonfuls each day; while 
I gave the mangifera and echinacea only about once 
a day. 

1 believe that sulphur is the principal medicine. 
I don't doubt but that a large per cent of cases can 
be cured by omitting the sulphur and using the 
echinacea and mangifera regularly; but I believe I 
can cure a great many more cases by using less 
echinacea find mangifera and more sulphur. 

Doctors who are not of the eclectic profession and 
know what effect echinacea and mangifera have, and 
lor what they are given, and know the condition of 
the dog, can doubtless substitute other medicines that 
would get the same results. These remedies were 
suggested by a doctor of the eclectic profession 
whose son was at that time handling my dogs. 

If I have any more cases, and it does not develop 
on my best dogs, as an experiment I am going to 
leave off the mangifera and echinacea, using more 
sulphur from the start. 

When I first began to use the sulphur, a year ago, 
I could not believe that a dog could stand a table- 
spoonful each day, yet a friend of mine told me he 
gave his dogs two tablespoonfuls each. In this last 
case, when I increased the sulphur, I noticed that 
the dog's condition seemed to improve. 

It's very difficult to get a sick dog to take sulphur. 
When a dog is taken sick, before he loses his appe- 
tite and becomes unable to swallow his food, I be- 
lieve if you will mix the sulphur — a tablespoonful 
twice a day — with food that he will relish, he will 
never get to a stage where he will be unable to eat. 

I waited so long before beginning the sulphur treat- 
ment on this last dog that he had no appetite, 
wouldn't eat, and could not drink water on account 
of the condition of his mouth. I knew that it would 
require food and water to keep him alive; so twice 
a day I thoroughly mixed a tablespoonful of sulphur 
with an egg, and sometimes I put in a tablespoonful 
of whisky. This mixture I put into a big-mouthed 
bottle and drenched the dog; sometimes I used two 
eggs, but I think two eggs too much at one time. 

About twice a day I would drench the dog with one- 
half teacupful of water, as he could not take water 
of his own accord; but a better plan would be to 
reduce the quantity and give oftener. 

In every case I find that about five or six days 
after the dog takes this disease he begins to pass 
blood, being affected just like a person with flux. 
And considering this condition, I feel sure that the 
intestines are affected just like the mouth. 

The most difficult part of the disease to handle is 
regulating the bowels. I gave this last mentioned 
dog on an average of from five to ten cents' worth 
of bismuth a day. I also gave him, in broken doses, 
paregoric, laudanum and salts, mixed, and gave him 
one or two doses of Jamaica ginger. At one time I 
gave him one-fourth teaspoonful of black pepper. 

Just what checked his bowels I don't know. I 
never did get his bowels checked until I cut his food 
down to one egg a day and gave that at different 
times, and gave but little sulphur that day. Begin- 
ning on the following day after I got his bowels 
checked, I gave him a teaspoonful of ground beef, 
raw, about three times a day, and one egg. I would 
mix with the beef about a grain of table salt. I 
increased his food very slowly, knowing that a re- 
lapse would doubtless mean death. 

I wasn't so anxious about this particular dog, but 
the reason I gave his case such close attention was 
that I might from this experience learn how to treat 
the other man's dogs and dogs I hope to own if they 
became similarly affected. 

Every case that I have lost since I learned any- 
thing about treating the disease has been lost on 
account of my inability to control the bowels. I 
don't believe anything we give the dogs will stop 
that bloody flow until the sulphur, or some other 
remedy, has time to purify the blood; and it is neces- 
sary for this bowel trouble to run its course to a 
certain extent. Yet if not eventually controlled, the 
death of the dog will be the result. 

If we have no desire to immediately check the 
bowels, I think that bismuth, or some other prepara- 
tion to reline the bowels, should be given during the 
day. 

I suppose you think I have covered much ground 
trying to tell you how I treated this dcg, and that I 
have a very poor way of expressing myself. 



CALIFORNIA SALMON FISHING INDUSTRY. 



In view of the fact that many round dollars, paid 
by the sportsmen of this State for annual hunting 
licenses, are expended in maintaining and develop- 
ing the "salmon industry" in this State, the follow- 
ing excerpts from a recent government report may 
be of appreciative interest: J 

"John N. Ccbb, assistant government agent in 
charge of salmon fisheries in Alaska, has prepared a 
report to the United States Fisheries Bureau on the 
Pacific Coast salmon fisheries. Mr. Cobb describes the 
different varieties of salmon and tells of their habits 
and the periods of their runs for spawning up the 
Sacramento, McCloud, Fall, Klamath, Eel, Mad, and 
Smith rivers, in California, the Rogue river in south- 
ern Oregon, and other streams further up the coast 
until the Arctic ocean is reached. 

Mr. Cobb says that much of the catch in the 
Klamath and other small California rivers is pickled. 
Salmon formerly frequented the Feather and Ameri- 
can rivers, but the development of irrigation and min- 
ing either killed them off or drove them away. The 
facts are similar concerning the San Jcaquin river, 
in which the fish formerly were abundant. 

The intitial event in the history of salmon fisher- 
ies on the Pacific Coast occurred on the Sacramento, 
when R. D. Hume, his brothers, and Andrew S. Hap- 
good, formerly of Maine, after having tried salmon 
fishing near Sacramento, established the first can- 
nery at Washington, Yolo county. That was in 1864. 
Some years later the Humes went north and did 
business on the Columbia river. These men had pre- 
viously been canning lobsters in Maine. The rail- 
roads afforded the Sacramento canning industry 
transportation facilities, the equal of which are noL 
yet enjoyed by some localities frequented by these 
fish, and the Sacramento industry, which began cn an 
old scow and was continued in a log cabin on the 
river bank outside the levee opposite the foot of K 
street, Sacramento, and in other establishments, was 
not stopped until 1905, when the canners found they 
could no longer compete with the fish picklers and 
fresh fish men. 

Mr. Cobb's report describes the apparatus used 
in salmon fishing and methods of canning. Statistics 
of the industry by counties and by waterways are 
given in the report. The run of the fish last year 
in the Sacramento was pronounced very fair. Over 
2600 men are employed in the industry in California. 
More than half of these were engaged on the Sacra- 
mento and its tributaries, more than nine-tenths of 
the total California investment of $1,232,000 in the 
industry is represented in that river system, and 
about four-fifths of the total State catch was made 
there. 

Besides the first cannery, Mr. Cobb says that the 
first fish cultural station on the Pacific Coast was 
located on the McCloud river at Baird. The history 
of this station and of the stations cn the Hoopa In- 
dian reservation, Humboldt county; at Korbel, on 
Mad river; Battle creek, Tehama county; Sisson, Sis- 
kiyou county, and at other points is given in the re- 
port. It is estimated that these fish cultural stations, 
maintained by the United States Fisheries Bureau 
and the State of California, have distributed about a 
billion salmon eggs and over 700,000,000 fry. These 
fish and eggs have been planted in many of the rivers 
of northern California and many have even been 
shipped across the continent and to foreign countries, 
to introduce the salmon to strange waters." 

A recent exchange states in connection with the 
run of salmon, now about over, that "the market fish- 
ermen working along the Sacramento river near 
Chico are meeting with excellent success just now, 
and are making big hauls of salmon. There is a 
ready market for the fish, and good prices are being 
obtained. 

The catch of one of these men, J. Wagner, last 
week amounted to 2S00 pounds, and already this week 
he has taken 1600 pounds. He has four men helping 
him. Most of his catch is shipped north to Portland. 
It is said that better prices are to be obtained there 
thon in this vicinity." 

Comment is hardly necessary, the situation is evi- 
dent at a glance. Just why, however, the retail price 
cf salmon in our local markets is put on for all the 
tariff will bear is another question and worthy of in- 
vestigation. 

o 

Locked Horns. — One of the most unusual freaks in 
the history of Butte county was exhibited recently 
when W. H. Roberts of the Gladstone Mine, Shasta 
county, showed to his friends a pair of deer herns 
locked together in such a fashion that even human 
ingenuity could not separate them. The horns have 
been sent to Sacramento and will be presented by 
Roberts to a fraternal society there. The impres- 
sion is that the deer began to fight in the Harrison 
Gulch District. In the deadly conflict their h.-rns 
sprung and became locked and in the fight for free- 
dom they died from exhaustion. It is thought by 
those who are familiar with the habits of deer and 
like animals that they tried to separate and that is 
what caused the erosive spaces on the horns. It was 
apparent that they lived about ten days without food 
or water. The horns were cut from the prostrate car- 
casses as they lay in the forest. 



Charles Tichacheek, an apple grower near Morri- 
son, Wash., opened the fence into his last year's 
melon patch and trapped 400 jackrabbits inside the 
fence. The rabbits were sent to Spokane. 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IN MEMORI AM. 



I read in a daily paper this morning that John Ken- 
nedy Orr had died at 7 a. m. Sunday at his home in 
Berkeley from a stroke of apoplexy. I had known 
John Orr for many years and hunted with him many 
times. He had made an appointment with me, writ- 
ing January 26th, that he would come to Point Reyes 
station, get my English setter dog Boy, and go quail 
hunting near Point Reyes. "Man proposes, but God 
disposes." 

Two weeks ago Crit. Robinson died, my schoolmate 
and friend. The only two old sportsmen to attend 
■'Grit's" funeral were John Orr and Clarence Haight. 
Such is the irony of Fate. 

Both Orr and Robinson thirty years ago were the 
two best shots with a shotgun on the Pacific Coast. 
A match or a series of matches were arranged be- 
tween the two men for the championship of the 
State. Cfit. Robinson won the championship by one 
bird. 

John Orr loved his old friends and held them close. 
He loved outdoor life and the hills in which the deer 
hide, and the upland slopes where the quail lay to 
the point of the setter. He loved the marshes and 
the ponds in which ducks splashed and fed; the bor- 
dering fringes and pasture land where the English 
snipe "bored" or sped in zig-zag flight only to fall 
prone to his unerring aim. 

In very many respects he was a true sportsman. 
Many times he has told me of his friend Teddy 
Tenret's advice to him. "Mr. Orr, you are a good 
shot, but you are tco hasty. You shoot your game too 
quickly. Give the bird more time. Just say 'Jack 
Bunsby' before you shoot. Then you will not ruffle 
a feather." John learned the lesson well. His bag ot 
birds always showed they had been killed by the 
hand of an artist. He would lose half an hour to get 
a wounded bird, rather than to let it be devoured by 
vermin, or die a slow death. 

To show the regard in which my friend John held 
his old time friends, I heard that an old gendarme 
named Pollete, a hunting companion of Mr. Orr's on 
many an outing, after he died, penniless, was kindly 
taken and buried in the cemetery at Tomales, not in 
an unknown grave, but in one marked by a marble 
slab, placed there by the beneficence of him who has 
just gone on the long journey. 

Let us hope that in a better land he has joined 
the loved ones who have gone before, and is waiting 
to receive those who shall come after him. 

PAYNE SHAFTER. 

Olema, January 29, 1911. 

HUNTING NOTES. 

For the past week duck hunting condtions have 
been excellent at nearly all of the hunting resorts. 
The Sunday contingent having a bit the better sport 
than the mid-week gunners. 

Goose hunting at various shooting grounds— Wil- 
lows, Colusa, Maine Prairie, Rio Vista, and other 
places is now in full swing — thousands upon thou- 
sands of the birds are to be seen. 

Duck hunters at different valley points during the 
previous week have enjoyed excellent sport. Near 
Newman on Wednesday, eleven trigger pullers each 
bagged limits, nearly all large birds. The shooting 
in that vocinity was the best in years. 

The recent rainy weather was most favorable for 
mallard shooting in the Sacramento, Yolo basin and 
San Joaquin tule overflows. Mallards like to take 
shelter on rainy, windy days in the lee of the heavy 
tule growths. 

Ryer Island Gun Club members, including C. M. 
Jones, Jack Perkins, P. Porter and others all shot 
mallard Wednesday. The birds had been "working 
in" to the ponds in thousands on the club's non- 
shooting days. 

Sunday on the Volante Gun Club preserve mem- 
bers and guests, numbering ten guns, all shot limits 
in the different ponds. Among those present were: 
James Maynard, W. W. Kaufman, J. D. McKee, 
George Uhl, Harry Blatchley, Frank Maroney, Ned 
Dimond and Ellis Parrish. 

The gunners at the Pat Calhoun preserve were: W. 
M. Gannon, Dr. Bacigalupi, Dr. Sam Gardner, John 
Barr, Dr. James Murphy and W. L. Gerstle. Ducks 
were numerous enough to contribute a limit for each 
shooter. 

George P. McNear was the single Joyce Island Gun 
Club member to take advantage of the fine shooting 
conditions on the same day. 

East bay shore shooting from the blinds has en- 
abled many independent gunners to get good strings 
of canvasbacks and bluebills. Near the Key Route 
mole, throughout the week, immense flocks of "cans" 
and "blueys" have taken things easy despite the har- 
rying fusillade given them by the bombardiers posted 
in innumerable blinds and paddling after them in 
skiffs. 

The bay shooting near San Quentin point enabled 
during the week many hunters to burn powder suc- 
cessfully. Leo Welnand and Charles Bouton report 
the shooting to be good. 

Phil B. Bekeart, Emil Holling and L. K. Grundy of 
Chicago made the duck shooting party at Curley 
Lodge last Sunday. 

George Klahrman's four days' shoot at Gustine was 
a limit quota every day a week ago. 

Ray Jones and Clarence Lucky shot near Newark 
on the bay shore Wednesday. The trip was a double 
limit one. 

Leslie Gun Club members, Ed. L. Hoag, Com- 



mander Reynolds, W. Hogan, Dr. Otto Westerfeld, 
were in on the Wednesday duck gathering on the San 
Mateo marshes. 

W. H. Hillegass and J. Henry Meyer shot on pri- 
vate grounds near Elkhorn station. Last week and 
for several weeks past the ducks have been plentiful, 
good shooting being the rule. 

On the near-by Empire Gun Club grounds eight 
members Sunday and three gunners Wednesday were 
stationed in favorable blinds for a good shoot indi- 
vidually. 

Guy T. Wayman, William Kent, John Lawson and 
William Denman, who shoot from blinds on the 
Stewart pond, near Denverton, have not been over- 
looked by the broadbills since the season opened. 

Goose and duck shooting near Rio Vista has im- 
proved recently. Frolic Gun Club members, George 
W. Ellery and C. F. Breidenstein were at the club ark 
last Sunday. 

o 

ANGLING BRIEFS. 



For the present local angling operations will be 
confined principally to the tidewaters of Paper Mill 
creek, near Point Reyes station. The prospects for 
tomorrow are considered alluring. The creek was 
high, and the clay-colored water pouring into the 
main stream from Nicassio creek did not add to 
favorable water conditions the previous Sunday. At 
that there will be quite a gathering of the regulars at 
the resort. 

Lots of seven to nine inch steelhead are reported 
to be in the creek, but the big steelhead are not yet 
in much evidence. Two weeks ago Sunday, a bright, 
sunshiny day, George Uri's 1 pound trout was the 
best showing made. 

Last Sunday a few small fish were taken. High 
hook for the day was the 8 pound salmon caught 
by the veteran angler, Jas. Watt. 

Billy McGregor and Frank Dolliver were fishing in 
the pool opposite the slaughter house. Dolliver 
hooked a big fish — over ten pounds, at least. The 
steelhead made a short run and broke away with the 
leader and fifteen feet of line dangling from his jaw. 

Among the rod wielders out were: Milton Frank- 
enburg, Frank Marcus, Charles Isaac, Floyd Spenre, 
Mose Uri, John Cattermole, Frank Messner, Joe Pin- 
cus, W. F. Cooper, E. H. Humphrey, E. Z. Howe and 
wife and ethers. 

Russian river advices were not encouraging for 
much sport at present. The river is high and the 
water too roily for any chances to tempt the steel- 
head to strike the spoon or take a baited hook save 
by running on top of the angler's lure. 

The past week's spell of pleasant weather may 
make a trip to the river worth the while. 

Pescadero lagoon is credited with a big run of 
steelhead within the last week. San Gregorio lagoon, 
on the contrary, at last advices, had not shown any 
indications of the expected run of trout. 

Last Sunday one of the Wingo anglers hooked and 
landed a 40 pound striped bass, the hig fish was 
flanked by a 12y 2 pounder caught by Chas. P. Lan- 
dresse, several other smaller fish were also taken. 
All this indicating that Wingo is getting on the fish- 
ing map again. 

A week before die anglers who visited the Wingo 
sloughs and creeks got color to a slight degree. 
George Roberts landed two steelhead trout, each of 
them 2y 2 pounders. The trout made their way up 
the creek from the bay. Joe Dober connected with 
a 5 pound striped bass and landed the fish. Adam 
Hackmier caught a 4 pound bass. 

These results, no doubt, will induce a big attend- 
ance of the gum-booted levee trotters tomorrow. Other 
anglers present were: Louis Gotthelf, Tim Lynch, 
Dick Cunningham, W. J. Street, Jack Duckell and 
others. Those who failed in capturing fish were re- 
compensed with gathered mushrooms. The pasture 
lands near by are famous for fine mushrooms. One 
man returned with fifteen gallons picked in but a 
short time. 

San Antone has given faint indication of the pres- 
ence of bass, the creek waters, however, are believed 
to be too salty for good results at present. Other 
striped bass resorts are not offering any prize induce- 
ments these days. 

There is an indication of a run of steelhead trout 
in San Francisco and tributary bays. Up river net 
fishermen have been catching a few of these trout. 
Near Kentfield in a confluent of Corte Madera creek 
several 2V 2 pound trout were taken last Sunday, a 
good run of fish was on, numerous anglers equipped 
with faulty tackle were repeatedly cleaned out. 

PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIALS CLUB. 

The Pacific Coast Field Trials Club at its annual 
meeting last week in Hakersfield re-elected Judge 
Charles N. Post of Sacramento president, and the 
lollowing officers: First vice president, J. E. Terry, 
Sacramento; second vice president, Lloyd Tevis, 
Hakersfield; secretary, E. C. Ford, San Francisco; 
executive committee, F. J. Ruhstaller, Sacramento; 
J. W. Flynn, San Francisco; J. II. Schumacher, Los 
Angeles; H. C. Katze, Hakersfield, and S. Christen- 
son, San Francisco. 

The club Is In prosperous condition and elected 
ten new members at this meeting. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



FISH AND GAME COMMISSION NOTES. 



So far as lecal police operations by the Fish and 
Game Commisisoners is concerned the moral effect 
should have some force. Throughout the State the 
deputies are equally vigilant and are making arrests 
daily. The present campaign should be of great edu- 
cational benefit, particularly to the foreign element. 
Many of these gentry seem to be imbued with the 
idea that fish and game laws are like piecrust— only 
made to be broken. 

Seven squads of Fish and Game Commisison dep- 
uties visited different local market stalls and restau- 
rants last Saturday provided with search warrants to 
uncover any infractions of the wild game limit law or 
the illegal traffic in non-saleable game birds. 

The forenoon raid was without result. At noon 
time the unexpected appearance of Deputy A. Fair- 
child and five assistants at the Bay State Hotel on 
O'Farrell street, produced 113 ducks from the kitchen 
larder. 

Z. Mallani & Co.'s poultry stand in the Nevada 
Market, at 1608 Market street, turned over 84 ducks 
after M. S. Clark and four deputies searched the 
place. This seizure spoiled an advertised cut rate 
sale of wild game for Saturday. 

Miller & Campagno in the Spreckels Market, S. 
Campagno & Sons, 1444 Polk street, Baccigalupi, 
Rossi & Co., Sutter and Polk streets, and Onorato 
Brothers, Fillmore and California streets, were all 
inside the limit qualifications Saturday morning. 

Deputy W. J. Sedgeley and a squad failed to un- 
earth anything contraband in Oakland the same 
morning. 

Monday afternoon a shift was made to the Latin 
quarter. After the simultaneous inspection by three 
squads of deputies of the Fior D'ltalia, New Bon 
Gusto and Dante restaurant kitchens not enough 
ducks were found in the three places to count up one 
limit of wild ducks. 

Three details of deputies made another round of 
popular restaurants Tuesday afternoon. 

Sixty-one fat mallard, sprig and teal were found in 
the cellar of the Mint restaurant, on Commercial 
street near Montgomery. 

"Jack's" on Sacramento street, near Montgomery, 
yielded thirty-two ducks, all picked and ready for 
the oven. 

Coppa's restaurant, on Pine street, developed a 
cupboard of the Mother Hubbard variety, so far as 
wild game cut any figure. 

A fourth detail of deputies visited Blanco's on O'Far- 
rell street, between Larkin and Polk. This expedi- 
tion returned to headquarters with one undersized 
striped bass. 

Early this week Deputy Wm. Armstrong, of Vallejo, 
seized an illegal small meshed net 3600 feet long at 
the mouth of Carquinez straits, off the Mare Island 
lighthouse. 

The net was submerged and anchored in deep water 
and was operated by a crew of three men in a boat. 
These nets are worth at least $1.00 per foot, as this 
seizure means confiscation and destruction of the net, 
it will be readily understood that Armstrong's cap- 
ture is an important one. 

SKILLED MOOSE HUNTERS. 



While the Penobscot or Tarratine Indian is not 
considered the equal of the expert white man as a 
rifle shot, he is the best moose shot in the woods. 
This sinewy, fleetfooted woodsman is fond of picking 
up a moose trail just after a light snow has fallen. 
Then, in light marching order, he will follow the 
animal across the country until he tires him out or 
kills him. The process frequently takes from three 
to four days, and it is possible only to the hardiest 
of pursuers. 

When first started a moose will make off through 
the woods with the speed of an express train. If it 
is early in the season and there has been but a light 
fall of snow the traveling is good and it is a simple 
matter to follow the trail. At length the animal, 
confident of having thrown off his pursuer, will 
gradually slacken its pace and stop. But it is off 
again immediately upon hearing the first sound or 
upon the presence of those who are following. 

It is a fact that a vigorous man can tire out a 
moose in the long run, and the Indian will at length 
approach near enough to get a shot. He can burden 
himself with but little in the way of camp equipage, 
however, and then a scanty supply of food and a 
blanket is all that he carries besides his rifle. 

This method of killing moose is regarded by many 
as being far the most sportsmanlike. Surely It re- 
quires endurance and determination as well as wood- 
craft, and the man who has procured a head in this 
fashion has done something which would be impos- 
sible for the average sportsman. 

No white man, no matter how expert, can ever 
quite equal an Indian in following a trail or In a 
canoe. The Indians seem to possess an aptitude in 
the handling of these frail craft which has come 
down to them through a long line of forebears. 

However, lew birch canoes are made nowadays. 
Tough winter bark is used in their construction, and 
with the encroachments of civilization It Is becoming 
more and more expensive each year to get It. A high 
grade birch canoe will outclass three which are 
covered with canvas, and a few are still built to order 
every year on Indian Island, Me. They are much 
heavier thon the canvas canoes, however, and for 
long trips, where there are frequent carries, most 
people prefer the canvas covered craft. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912. 



GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP. 



Pittsburg, Pa. — Please announce to the readers of 
the Breeder and Sportsman that the thirteenth Grand 
American Handicap tournament, that of 1912, will be 
held at Springfield, 111., on June 18, 19, 20 and 21, on 
the grounds of the Illinois Gun Club. There will be 
$1,500 added money, and the winner of first place in 
the Grand American Handicap proper will be guar- 
anteed $1,000 in cash, in addition to a handsome 
trophy. 

Also be kind enough to announce that our seventh 
Western Handicap tournament will be held at Kan- 
sas City, Mo., on August 14, 15 and 16, under the 
auspices of the Kansas City Gun Club; $1,000 added 
money. 

ELMER E. SHANER, Secy.-Treas. 
Pittsburg, Pa. — Please announce also to the read- 
ers of the Breeder and Sportsman that, since their 
annual meeting of last December, the directors of 
the Interstate Association have ruled that money 
entries in the Grand American Handicap shall be 
confined to amateurs. Professionals will be allowed 
to shoot in the Grand American Handicap for "tar- 
gets only," and compete for a special trophy donated 
by the Interstate Association. 

ELMER E. SHANER, Secy.-Treas. 

o 

AT THE TRAPS. 



Tacoma, January 25. — Before the Tacoma Rod and 
Gun Club, near American Lake, this afternoon the 
touring trap shooting teams rounded out their tenth 
contest, and the Spokane team finally won a match 
by the score of 187 against 183 for the San Francisco 
team. Portland was third. 

Hugh Poston and Less Reid, representing Spokane, 
were in good trim, for the former broke 93 targets, 
while his teammate went him one better with a score 
of 94. Fred Willet, the San Francisco star, was once 
more high man for the day. He broke 95 targets, 
while his partner, Fisher, fell down, breaking but 88 
today. The Tacoma event makes the tenth shoot of 
the tour, and 1000 total targets were shot at; Willet 
has the remarkable record of having broken 941 of 
this total. Holohan is the only other man to do 
better than 90 per cent, for he has broken 908 of the 
thousand. The scores today were: 

Spokane, 187 (Reid 94, Poston 93). 

San Francisco, 183 (Willet 95, Fischer 88). 

Portland, 171 (Holohan 84, Robertson 87). 

The Aberdeen date for January 26 was cancelled. 

Vancouver, B. C, January 27. — Before the trap 
shooters of the Vancouver Gun Club here this after- 
noon the Spokane and San Francisco teams of the 
trio now touring the northwest broke the world's trap 
shooting record for teams by scoring 194 breaks each, 
which resulted in a tie. In the shoot off, Willet and 
Fisher of San Francisco won out by the narrow 
margin of one bird, scoring 46 against 45 for Spo- 
kane. 

In addition to breaking the team records, the teams 
also broke all marks for the tour. Hugh Poston of 
the Spokane team was high man for the day, he not 
only scored the greatest number of breaks in the 
century run, but he also tallied high man in the 
shoot-off. Poston's record for the day was 98 in the 
regular event, and in the shoot-off of the tie he broke 
24 of 25 targets. His teammate, Reid, made the fine 
score of 96 in the regular event, but missed four 
right angle targets in the shoot-off. Today's scores 
of two teams each with better than 96 per cent is 
claimed to be a world's record. The scores today 
were: 

San Francisco, 194 (Willet 97, Fisher 97). 
Spokane, 194 (Poston 98, Reid 96). 
Portland, 183 (Holohan 95, Robertson 88). 
The teams shoot at Wenatchee Tuesday. 



Wenatchee, Wash., January 30. — All three teams of 
the visiting trap shooters broke better than 90 per 
cent of their targets today and this despite the cold 
and the fact that the ground was covered some two 
two feet deep with snow. The San Francisco team, 
Willet and Fisher, was again victorious, each break- 
ing 96 for a total of 192, while the Portland repre- 
sentatives, with 189, and the Spokane duo, with 186, 
were second and third, respectfively. 

Today's shoot was the twelfth event of the tour, 
and San Francisco has now won nine, Portland two 
and Spokane one match. 

Pete Holohan was high man for the day, breaking 
99 out of his 100 targets, and had an incompleted run 
of 90 consecutive breaks at the finish of the competi- 
tive match. 

The scores today were: 

San Francisco 192 (Willet 96, Fisher 96). 

Portland 189 (P. Holohan 99, G. Holohan 90). 

Spokane 186 (Poston 93, Reid 83). 

The teams shoot at North Yakima Thursday, Pasco 
Friday and Spokane Sunday, when some great scores 
are anticipated when the Holohans get after each 
other. The race for high gun on the Portland team 
will be worth watching. 



W. France, amateur of Houston, by remarkably 
consistent shooting won the Sunny South Handicap 
January 26, and with Alfred Gardner, also a Houston 
amateur, as his teammate, won the team champion- 
ship of Texas. 

France won the handicap by breaking 25 targets 
straight in a shoot-off after tying Tom Marshall, 
professional, and P. L. Parsons, amateur of Hot 
Springs, Ark., with 95 breaks each out of a possible 
100. 

N. A. Rie of Houston was high amateur the same 
day with 189 out of a possible 200; P. L. Parsons of 
Hot Springs, Jay Graham of Long Lake, 111., and 



Harvey Dixon of Oronogo, Mo., tied for second with 
188, and Ed Forsgard of Waco, Tex., third with 187. 

In the professional class, W. R. Crosby of O'Fallon, 
111., led with 193; Ben Schwartz of Houston was 
second with 189. 

On the five day program Billy Crosby and Billy 
Herr, professionals, led w-ith 961, followed by Gra- 
ham, amateur, with 949. 



A. E. Rainey of the New York Yacht Club won the 
Preliminary trophy of the annual midwinter trap 
shooting tournament of the Pinehurst (N. C.) Coun- 
try Club, scoring 93 from the 18 yard mark. The 
outcome was uncertain until the last shot w r as fired. 

The score of 92 tied for second place. R. L. Shotts, 
the Larchmont Yacht Club champion, who shot from 
19 yards, with B. B. Ward, of Aberdeen, Md., and 
R. H. Bruns of Brookville, Ind., both shooting from 
the 18 yard line. Walter Huff and Jim Skelly led 
the professionals with 92 and 91. 

In the morning sweepstakes, G. S. McCarty of Phil- 
adelphia was first with 98, tieing with George L. 
Lyon, a professional. 

o 

SAN FRANCISCO SHOW. 



The fourteenth annual bench show of the San 
Francisco Kennel Club, organized February 3, 1897, 
incorporated 1909, announces the judges for the com- 
ing show: 

Charles R. Harker of San Jose will judge St. Ber- 
nards, Newfoundlands, mastiffs and English bull- 
dogs. 

J. E. Webster of St. Joseph, Mo., will judge English 
and Gordon setters, Chesapeake Bay, Irish water, 
cocker, clumber and field spaniels, fox, bull, French 
bull and Boston terriers, Danes, dachshunds, Russian 
wolfhounds, bloodhounds, foxhounds, greyhounds, 
Dalmations and curley poodles. 

C. W. Buttles of Kansas City will judge Irish set- 
ters, English retrievers. 

G. S. Halliwell of San Francisco will judge Esqui- 
maux, Chows, sky terriers, Whippets, pugs. Chihua- 
huas, Pomeranians, Italian greyhounds, all toys and 
other breeds. 

The club officers are: William Ellery, president; 
H. B. Blatchly, vice-president; Wm. V. N. Bay, sec- 
retary-treasurer; Dog Show Committee — William El- 
lery (chairman), J. Harvey Jones, W. V. N. Bay, P. 
M. Wand, William Blackwell, H. B. Blatchly, W. G. 
McMahon, Sydney St. L. Cavill, H. B. Lister, C. W. 
Riffee; Honorary Promotion Committee — The Ladies' 
Kennel Association of California (Inc.), Mrs. Henry 
Lister, president; G. L. Meade, Secretary of the show; 
.1. C. Berret, superintendent; Dr. K. O Steers, veter- 
inary surgeon. 

The club offices for information, premium lists 
and entries are No. 5S3-85 Market street, San Fran- 
cisco; phone, Douglas 4646. Oakland office, No. 454 
Ninth street; phone, Oakland 602. 

The club announces in the premium list a pream- 
ble that will strike a key note with every fair-minded 
sportsman, as follows: 

It will be understood that on account of the mul- 
titude of little details connected with the holding 
of this show that it will be impossible for us to at- 
tempt correspondence with every fancier, no matter 
how much we would like to, hence we will say here 
that we earnestly request the support of each and 
every dog lover and owner, and ask that they help 
make a record-breaker in the annals of Coast shows. 
We ask this in the interest of the thoroughbred dogs, 
and wish every dog owner to feel that this show is 
the "Fancier's Show," rather than the show of the 
club. 

It is well known that the club was organized solely for 
the purpose of lending its mite toward creating addi- 
tional interest in "man's best friend" (the dog), and 
ill inviting all fanciers to exhibit their specimens in 
friendly competition it hopes that thoroughbred dogs 
may be better understood, and a greater desire in- 
stituted for their possession, that we of the Pacific 
Coast may boast the ownership of better specimens 
and more of them than can be claimed for any other 
section. 

In affiliating with the National Dog Breeders' As- 
sociation, a progressive national body of fanciers 
banded together solely in the interest of our friend, 
the thoroughbred dog, and including in its fold some 
of the leading kennel clubs in this State, the San 
Francisco Kennel Club has exercised the American 
right to have a direct voice in the government of 
Western dogdom, and has at the same time pinned 
its faith on a "home institution," in which action it 
believes it has the cordial support of all California 
fanciers who stand for "a square deal to the dog." 

Dogs need not necessarily have a pedigree to en- 
title them to entry. Where the particulars are un- 
known, dogs of any recognized breed may be entered 
in the Challenge, Maiden, Graduate or Selling Classes, 
by stating on the entry blank the word "Unknown," 
in the event of the date of birth, breeder and pedi- 
gree of the exhibit being unknown to the owner. 

In the case of dogs coming by express, exhibitors 
are requested to ship so that the dogs will arrive in 
San Francisco the day before the show opens, where 
they will be taken charge of and cared for under the 
direction of the superintendent. Arrangements have 
been made with Wells, Fargo & Co. fbr the prompt 
delivery of all dogs shipped through them. 

Exhibitors will please note the conditions of the 
various classes provided for in the National Dog 
Breeders' Association regulations governing dog 
shows, which will be found in this premium list. 



Where no class has been provided for a recognized 
breed, if three or more dogs of that breed are entered 
in the Miscellaneous Class, a breed class will then 
be made for them. 

The club is sparing neither pains nor expense to 
make this show one that will be pleasantly remem- 
bered by every exhibitor and instructive to all 
patrons. Its interest lies in all breeds and to have 
"the best dog win." 

o 

ECHOES FROM THE NORTHWEST. 



[By August Wolf] 

A three years' war will be waged against the coy- 
ote by farmers, sportsmen and members of the 
Spokane Rod and Gun Club and Spokane Fish Pro- 
tective Association, according to Al Wieseman, sec- 
retary of the two local clubs, who said: 

"We will start out at once on the work of ex- 
terminating. Farmers from all over the country 
have appealed to our association for aid, and we 
have voted to do everything in our power to help 
them. 

"The coyote is ruining the hunting in this sec- 
tion of the country, and we feel confident of being 
able to remedy the conditions. A big coyote drive 
will be held next spring, and it is expected that at 
least 500 farmers and hunters will participate. 

"We will send out notices to all farmers and try 
to have any number of grey and fox hounds imported 
into this section. With -the dogs it will be only 
a matter of a short time until the coyotes will be 
killed or driven out of the country." 



Mrs. M. Barrett and Mrs. Harry Brown are among 
the few enthusiastic women hunters of Spokane who 
tackle the shotgun sport in winter. They have 
bagged rabbits galore this season and plan to go 
alter the bunnies again soon. 

The forestry department has allowed William King- 
man, a trapper of Trout Lake Wash., to connect a 
telephone with the government line wnich was placed 
last summer. This is a great convenience for lonely 
trappers who have cabins in the reserve. Mr. King- 
man has secured 15 fine pelts this winter. During 
three weeks he has been operating his string of traps 
in the hills south and west of this place he has 
caught marten, fox and mink. 



Paul Redlands and Don Wright of Spokane recently 
enjoyed a day's rabbit shoot at Marshall junction 
where they are reported plentiful and easy to shoot.' 

Sportsmen and farmers throughout the Inland Em- 
pire have been invited by the Spokane Rod and Gun 
Club to assist in a campaign to exterminate the coy- 
ote, upon which there is a State bounty of $1 in 
Washington and $1.50 in Oregon. Al. F. Wieseman, 
secretary of the organization, thinks that the farm- 
ers, who are the chief sufferers, should lead in the 
movement by importing hounds, saying also that "the 
coyote is the worst enemy of small game, such as 
prairie chicken, quail, pheasants and ducks." 



Officers of the national forest service at Okan- 
ogan, Wash., recently advised the game warden and 
sheriff of the county that information has come to 
them through a veteran trapper in the Alder creek 
district of an attempt to capture a colonv of 200 
beavers at the head of the Pesayton river on the 
reserve. The plan of the poachers is to kill the 
beavers and store the hides in an unused cabin 
which is arranged with a canvas lining, the hides to 
be secreted between the walls and the canvas until 
the spring break up, when they will be packed to 
Bellingham. The matter has been referred back to 
the forest officers for action as the colony is on the 
reservation. 

Spokane Fish Protective Association, of which 
A. F. Wieseman is secretary, has secured 525,000 
eastern brook spawn, to be hatched at Dart ford and 
planted in the Spokane river, between Seven Mile 
bridge and the waterworks, early in May. Mr. 
Wieseman said: "We are working out an idea of 
making this quite a little ceremony, inviting the 
mayor and prominent citizens to come out to wit- 
ness it." 

Charles Liftchild, a prominent sportsman in Spo- 
kane, said in an interview a few days ago: "We may 
try to revive the agitation for uniform game laws for 
eastern Washington and the Idaho panhandle from 
the next Washington legislature if we can induce 
our Idaho friends to make a few concessions. Idaho 
has a good license idea, $1 entitling every resident 
to hunt or fish for one year. Idaho's open season 
is also more liberal. We would prefer to alter their 
non-resident license fee, which is now $2 for fishing 
and $5 for small game, to a uniform fee of $2 for 
small game and fishing. We should favor the reduc- 
tion of their $25 fee for big game to $10. We would 
encourage hunters to come into our country, not try 
to keep them out. 

o 

Mountain Lions Numerous. — About 100 miles dis- 
tant from this city in the Annapolis district in north- 
ern Sonoma county mountain lions have been driven 
by hunger down from the high ranges to the ranches. 

At the James McLennan place last Saturday one 
large and two small lions killed a big calf and 
dragged its body for a long distance back into the 
hills and there devoured it. 

Hunters and hounds have been endeavoring to run 
the beasts to earth since. 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



AN ENTHUSIASTIC HORSEMAN'S VIEWS. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman: 

Back again in Los Angeles feeling better regarding 
the prospects of light harness horse racing in Cali- 
fornia than ever. The two meetings of leading horse- 
men in San Francisco were attended by earnest, 
thoughtful men who have stayed with the game in 
fair and foul weather for years, and the way they 
spoke of the necessity of unity of purpose, a con- 
solidation of interests and a continuity of the race 
meetings in a big circuit was most encouraging. 

This idea, supplemented with that of holding a big 
harness horse meeting at the Stadium in 1915, is one 
that should be always kept to the front. We should 
endeavor in all ways possible to spread the news of 
this big meeting everywhere. It will be the greatest 
blessing that has ever occurred to the industry and 
we must let everybody known it. Horsemen should 
become "boosters" from this time on. Every letter 
and document mailed should have a line referring to 
this, "the biggest race meeting ever held!" All who 
are interested in horses in California, when writing 
to friends in the East or in foreign lands, should not 
forget to refer to it. 

There is no place in the world where the oppor- 
tunities are so great for light harness horse racing 
as on the Pacific Coast, and yet we have very little 
racing. To my way of thinking, lack of proper ad- 
vertising and publicity has had much to do with this, 
but I hope the cause has been entirely removed, for 
there are a few things which occurred lately which 
convince me and others that we have turned over a 
new leaf. The meeting in San Francisco, at which 
representatives from Vancouver, B. C, Washington, 
Utah, Oregon, Arizona, as well as California, attend- 
ed, and the one regarding the 1915 race meeting, 
seem to have given the industry a new lease of life, 
the effects of which will be noticeable everywhere. 
You will see more good mares bred this season than 
you have in years and these mares will all be named 
in the Futurities, the "mainstays to keep the harness 
horse industry alive." We need a few more good 
Futurities on this Coast. Why not have one for the 
Panama-Pacific Fair? When we have plenty of colt 
races we will see the breeding industry flourish. 
When we begin to show three-year-olds that can trot 
in 2:08 or 2:09, then we can look for some of that 
foreign trade which does not extend farther west 
• than Lexington, Kentucky. The Eastern breeders 
have the monopoly of this now, but they cannot 
monopolize the business of breeding and racing the 
fastest colts. California enjoyed that reputation 
once and will do so again. The P. C. T. H. B. Asso- 
ciation should remember this when giving their meet- 
ings and select a good, safe, fast track, so that our 
colts can show to the very best advantage; and there 
is another important thing that I believe should be 
remedied, and that is the apathy of owners of good 
mares who breed them to our best stallions, in fail- 
ing to enter the produce in Futurity stakes. They 
should realize that a colt well staked will sell more 
readily for a higher price than one that is not men- 
tioned in a Futurity or other stake. 

There is no reason why California should not 
henceforth raise and sell as many fast horses as any 
other State in the Union. I believe this is the year 
also that every man interested in the light harness 
horse industry should lay aside all jealousies and 
prejudices, put his shoulder to the wheel and push 
the industry along, and, if necessary, dig up a little 
change to establish a circuit on the Pacific Coast 
that should give it the prominence it deserves in the 
horse world. 

Mr. Brown, chairman of the State Board, is to have 
this Exposition Park track completed in a manner 
creditable to this section of the country, and there 
is no question but that it will be one of the finest 
and best equipped racing plants in the United States. 

Mr. W. A. Clark Jr., Mr. Bowen, Mr. Christopher, 
and a few other prominent men here will meet at a 
luncheon shortly to be given by Mr. Clark, to talk 
over plans for the proposed harness meeting to be 
held here this fall, and doubtless there will be some 
good resulting from such a conference. 

Sincerely yours, 

TED HAYES. 

o — 

NEW RACE TRACK AT BAKERSFI ELD. 



Bakersfield, Jan. 27. — A movement is now on foot 
among local sportsmen, principally the horsemen 
who seek the co-operation of the automobile and 
motorcycle men, to form an association to build two 
racing tracks, one for automobiles and the other 
for horse races. It is believed a tract suitable lor 
this purpose could be bought at a low sum a short 
distance from the city. The plan is to hold racing 
events by horse and auto on the same day, providing 
the people of Kern county with a good class of sports, 
something they can see all the time it is going on 

With the passing of Hudnut park with its hall 
mile track and grand stand into the possession of 
the Kern County High school as a high school I arm, 
the local sporting men were without a place to 
speed except on the public highway. It is be- 
lieved the merchants and residents generally will 
co-operate with the project, since the plan is to 
give the city something of a permanent character 
and something that is badly needed. 

Recreation Park fills one need of the sporting 
public and the fans. A race track for horses and 
another for automobiles, all fenced in would serve 
a still more general purpose and answer the needs 
of the time. It is stated the association could be 
formed on a paying basis. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE FERNDALE FAIR AND RACE MEETING. 



A meeting of the directors of the Ferndale Agri- 
cultural Fair Association was held last Monday even- 
ing. At this meeting the dates for the 1912 exposi- 
tion were set, and the fair will be held on Septem- 
ber 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th. Monday, the 9th, 
will be entry day, and Friday, the 13th, the closing 
day of the fair. An important move made by the 
directors was their decision to greatly increase the 
purses for the horse races. In many events they 
were almost doubled. One hundred dollars was added 
to the purse in the free-for-all trot and pace, the 
purse for which will this year be $350 instead of 
$250 as last year. That the increases right through 
are substantial ones may be noted by reading the 
following speed program as adopted by the directors 
at the meeting Monday evening: 

Trot and pace, 2:25 class, best three out of five, 
purse $300; trot and pace, 3:00 class, purse $125; 
farmers' buggy race, purse $20; running, %-mile 
dash, purse $50; trot and pace, 2:40, purse $225; trot 
and pace, two-year-olds, purse $100; trot and pace, 
three-year-olds, purse $150; running %-mile dash, 
purse $100; farmers' saddle race, %-mile, purse, $10; 
trot and pace, 2:35, $250; farmers' buggy race, purse 
$20; running, 4% furlongs, purse $75; running, mile 
dash, purse $125; ladies' driving race, purse $20; 
free-for-all trot and pace, purse $350. 

A change in the rules was also made by the direc- 
tors, so that it is now required that all trotting and 
pacing horses be owned in Humboldt county prior 
to January 1st, 1912. Heretofore the trotting and 
pacing events have been open to horses owned in 
Humboldt, Del Norte, and Mendocino counties. The 
running races as before are open to Humboldt, Del 
Norte, Trinity, and Mendocino horses. 

Special events will be added to the program as 
outlined above, and with the incentive of increased 
purses, it is considered that there will be more horses 
for the races this year than ever before. With better 
races there will be larger crowds, and even at this 
early date it seems safe to prophesy that the fair of 
1912 will be the greatest success in the history of 
Ferndale. 

o 

ADVICE TO BREEDERS. 



Dr. D. F. Herspring, in a communication to The 
Mail of Woodland, writes as follows: 

First, breed to the stallion that is fashionably bred 
and has the blood that the people want. Do not 
breed to a stallion whose colts only sell for $50 to 
$75. 

Never breed to a stallion whose front feet, (the 
toes) point outward for this is a deformity and is 
transmitted and the offspring is usually bad knee- 
knockers and interferes. 

Don't breed to a stallion with a thick jowl, or cne 
too narrow, one that has to wear a "derrick bit" 
to keep him from choking down when at speed. Be 
sure the stallion is free from curbs, sidebones, or 
other blemishes. Try to breed your mare to a stal- 
lion whose ancestors were noted for beauty and 
style and you will always have an animal that will 
sell for a good price. 

Try and see colts by the stallion you intend 
breeding to and if they are curby, have weak pas- 
terns, or other deformities, especially if their feet 
turn out, don't breed to them. 

Remember, that "like begets like." Always in- 
quire if the stallion is a trotter or pacer as some- 
times stallions are advertised as trotters when they 
are not 

Don't be misled by the new stallion law words. 
"Pure Bred," as the trotter has always been 
known as the "Standard Bred," and some of the 
best bred stallions in the world cannot be registered 
under ti e new rules due to the carelessness cf for- 
mer owners. 

THE CAN FIELD-CLARK STAKE NO. 4. 



Every breeder should make an entry in this stake 
and do what he can to stimulate the horse interests 
of California. Every foal entered in this stake will 
have his value increased. The prospective buyers 
will pay one-half more for a colt that is well staked 
and can show some class than he would pay for the 
same colt not staked. The race horse business is 
just the same as any other business. The capitalist 
will not put his money in unless there is a chance 
to get it out. Every day in the training season you 
will see parties looking around the tracks for good 
youngsters to buy, but they must be staked or you 
cannot interest them in your colt. The entrance fee 
is small and the cost of training to bring your colt 
up to a race as a two-year-old will not be large, in 
fact, very little larger than if he was not eligible to 
start in any stake. By entering in this stake you 
have two chances, as it has a trotting division and a 
pacing division, and as the guarantors have guaran- 
teed $1,600, $1,000 for the trotting division and $600 
lor the pacing division. 

It is up to the breeders to support this stake and 
all the other futurity stakes in California, as there is 
no other move that can be made that will make the 
race horse business progress faster than a liberal 
entry in the futurity stakes. Don't let this chance 
go by; it costs but $2 to nominate each foal and you 
should enter all your foals whether you intend to 
race or sell them. E. J. Delorey, the secretary of the 
California Breeders' Association, 305% South Spring 
street, Los Angeles, will reply to all inquiries re- 
garding it. 



FOR THE FAIR IN 1915 



The annual meeting of the California Live Stock 
Breeders' Association will be called in the near fu- 
ture, probably at the end of this month or the be- 
ginning of next. It is expected that the meeting will 
be held at the Palace Hotel, having a banquet in con- 
nection with it, tollowing the same custom that has 
held for the last two years. It seems to this paper 
that it is about time for stock men to get together 
and form a strong organization to work with the 
Panama Exposition Board in arranging a great live 
stock show in 1915. 

We understand there is a move on foot to have the 
heads of all the county and State fair associations 
of the coast attend this meeting, and with the chain 
of fairs already arranged by the latter officials, com- 
mencing with Vancouver, B. C, and finishing at 
Phoenix, Arizona, it would seem that the two bodies 
working in accord, have splendid prospects for a suc- 
cessful season. 

Another thing that will be of value in having this 
chain of fairs is the railroad rate proposition. The 
rate has been a one-way rate and home free; but the 
way fairs are generally run, the exhibitors have to 
double back, making complications which the rail- 
road and the live stock men will be glad to see 
abolished. 

A strong association would also be a great educa- 
tor in creating new herds to help make a greater 
show at the Panama Exposition in 1915 by the Pacific 
Coast exhibitors. Another thing the California Live 
Stock Business Association ought to take up is the 
question of money prizes for the State exhibitors. 
Every national show has always done this, and at the 
St. Louis World's Fair the State of Missouri made 
it possible for two exhibitors out of that State, one 
a Hereford breeder and the other a Berkshire breed- 
er, to realize $10,000 in premiums. 

Again the California breeders ought to undertake 
a steer, wether and barrow show. As California is 
away by itself and transportation rates are high, 
it would be well to have some kind of fat stock show. 
All it requires is a move by some of the leading San 
Francisco business men and it would go right to suc- 
cess. The State of Colorado started such a show four 
years ago, and now it has grown so that the Union 
Stock Yards at Denver have had to make many more 
improvements to accommodate the stock shipped 
there for exposition. The different breeders' asso- 
ciations would undoubtedly assist in the work, because 
at the International Show at Chicago this year the 
Short-horn Association of America offered a thousand 
dollars for the best carload of short-horn steers if 
they were made the grand champions of the show. 
The other beef breeders' associations put up similar 
prizes. One of the biggest Short-horn breeders in 
this State has now on hand some first-class Short- 
horn steers and it seems the only way to get the 
value of them is to send them to the Portland show 
to be held next March (why Portland ahead of San 
Francisco?) We know of another instance where 
the breeder has now on hand 40 steers, weighing 
over 1300 pounds and has no place to ship them un- 
less to Portland. They are in such a place where 
transportation rates kill all profits that would ac- 
crue to them in shipping to the Portland show. If 
such a fat-stock show was inaugurated here it would 
not only stimulate people to breed better steers, but 
would also make a larger market for men who are 
engaged in the pure-bred business. 

It is the duty of every live-stock man in the State 
to attend this meeting and lend his aid in fostering 
the live stock interests, as without an association 
nothing can be done. A move is also on foot by 
some of the directors to create a means whereby a 
paid secretary can be eiected to take charge of the 
live stock work. 

. So, breeders and stock men, when the call is an- 
nounced do not overlook the date, but come to San 
Francisco, partake of a meal at the Palace Hotel, 
join the association and get to work to help the live 
slock interests. — Rural Press. 

o 

It appears that twenty-six of the fifty-one new 2:10 
trotters of 1911 inherited the blood cf Seely's Ameri- 
can Star 14, and eleven of the twenty-six were de- 
scendants ol the renowned Clara, the dam of Dic- 
tator 113, a full brother of the noted old-time cham- 
pion trotter Dexter 2:17%. It will be remembered 
that Clara's son, Dictator 113, sired the first trotter 
to take so fast a record as 2:10, Jay Eye See 2:10. 
Dictator 113 also got 1 he dam of the champion trotter 
of her day, Nancy Hanks 2:04, and Director 2:17, a 
son of Dictator 113, got Directum 2:05%, that at four 
years of ago became the world's champion trotting 
stallion and the world's champion four-year-old trot- 
ter. The blood of Seely's American Star 14 is a pow- 
erful factor for imparting speed ability, generation 
after generation. Not less than twelve of the new 
2:10 trotters of 1911, that inherited the blood of 
Mambrino Patchen 58, had inherited the blood of 
Seely's American Star 14, directly back of the Mam- 
brino Patchen cross. They are as follows: Anvil 
2:08%, Chatty Direct (4) 2:09%, Electric Todd 
2:09%, Eva Tanguay 2:09%, Elizabeth Ray 2:09%, 
Muda Guy 2:09, Myrtle Granett 2:08%, Nada 2:09%, 
Olcott Axworthy 2:08%, Peter Thompson (3) 2:07%, 
Professor Heald 2:09%, and Vanity Oro 2:09%. This 
leaves only eight of the twenty new descendants of 
Mambrino Patchen 58 that made trotting records of 
2:10 or better for the first time last season that did 
not inherit the Seely"s American Star 14 cross, while 
there were fourteen of the new 2:10 descendants of 
Seely's American Star 14 that did not show a Mam- 
brino Patchen 58 cross. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912. 



STALLS FOR HORSES. 



The stall-floor in the horse-stables 
should be level; inclined planes are 
injurious. The horse is forced to 
stand in a cramped position, and if 
continued through a number of years, 
generally becomes permanently dis- 
abled. 

Inclined floors are usually construct- 
ed to afford drainage, but it is much 
better to supply enough bedding to 
absorb all liquids than to have them 
seep away and ferment, later to aggra- 
vate the horses' eyes and nose by 
pungent ammonia fumes. 

Nine feet by 4^ or 5 is about the 
proper size of stalls for the working 
horses. Stalls should never be six 
feet wide, for then the horse may turn, 
and there is danger of casting. 

The boards along the sides of the 
stalls should run lengthwise, in order 
to prevent wounds from slivers. Boards 
running up and down break easier, 
and are not so flexible. 

It does not matter so much what 
sort of a floor is put in, as the care 
taken of it. Plenty of bedding must 
be used at all times. If cement is 



Show Horse ! 

Race Horse!! 



Sire ! ! ! 



The Standard Trotting Stallion 

LIJERO 2:15i No - 45923) 

Sired by James Madison 2:17% (son 
of Anteeo 2:16V4), sire of 18 in 2:30 list. 
Including Brilliant 2-.08V4, Tuna 2:0S%, 
Emily W. 2:10; dam Hilda (dam of Wil- 
liam Albert 2:16V4, a sire. Saint Am- 
brose 2:25, and Lijero 2:15%. a sire), by 
Nutwood 2:18%, the world's champion 
broodmare sire; second dam Eudora by 
Volunteer, the greatest sire of race 
horses that ever lived; third dam by 
American Star 14, the sire whose 
daughters have produced 43 trotters 
and among them some of our greatest 
sires. 

Lljero is a brown stallion foaled In 
1902, stands 16.1, and weighs 1200 
pounds. He sired Expedio (3) 2:14 1 / 4- 
Public trial at Chico as a four-year-old 
In 2:08%. Lljero forced Prince Lot 
2:09 to trot in 2:10% at Woodland in 
1910 and was only beaten a head. He 
started in five races, won three and was 
second in the other two. and it gave 
Helen Stiles 2:08% and Prince Lot 2:09% 
all they could do to beat him in those 
two races. Very few horses have ever 
trotted in 2:10 with less work than 
Lljero. He should race in 2:08 this 
year. He has everything to recommend 
him as a game racehorse and as a sire 
he will undoubtedly be one of the best. 
He has size, style, color, conformation, 
disposition, the best of feet and legs, 
an iron constitution, and the purest 
of trotting action. His gameness is 
unquestioned. He is a perfect show 
horse and sires show horses. He and 
his daughter Expedio have won first 
prizes l« the standard class at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair. 

IDOItl W., registered in Vol. XIX, 
Brown mare, 15.2 hands: foaled 1901. 
Sired by James Madison 2:17%, dam 
Swift Tide by Albert W. 2:20; second 
dam Uarda (dam of Flowing Tide 
2:14%), by Echo; third dam Dewdrop. 
A sure breeder, due to foal to Lljero 
1912. Entered in State Futurity and 
Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

TOOTS W., registered, Vol. XIX. Bay 
mare, 15.2 hands; foaled 1907 by Stam 
B. 2:11%, dam Idora W. Due to foal 
to Lljero 1912. This mare is very fast, 
having worked quarters In 35 seconds 
as a two-year-old. Entered in State 
Fair Futurity and Breeders' Futurity 
Stakes. 

JAMES H. DONNELLEY, b. g., 15.3 
hands; foaled 1909. Sired by Lijero 
2:15>/fe, dam by Hanford Medium; second 
dam Algerine (dam of Kelly Briggs 
2:08), by Algona, etc. Entered in Breed- 
ers' Futurity and State Fair Futurity. 
With little work this one showed a 
mile in 1911 in 2:28, half In 1:10 and a 
quarter In 33 % seconds. He will make 
a 2:12 or better pacer this year. 

IVA W., b. f., foaled 1910; sired by 
Prince Ansel 2:20%; dam Idora W. 
(which see). Entered in Breeders' 
Futurity, State Fair Futurity and Oc- 
cident Stake. She is just broken to 
drive and will undoubtedly make a very 
fast mare. She is eligible for registra- 
tion. 

DR. JOHN, b. c. (1). by Palite (son of 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% and Pallta, 2, 
2:16); dam Toots W. (which see). En- 
tered in State Fair Futurity, Breeders' 
Futurity and Occident Stake. A fine 
large perfectly formed individual, nice- 
ly halter broken. 

These horses are all sound and in 
good condition, ready for anything that 
horses can be used for. The mare 
Toots W., if worked, will make a 2:12 
trotter, or even a lower record than 
this. 

On account of the many demands up- 
on my time In my business, I find I 
cannot devote any to the development 
or care of these, therefore I have de- 
cided to sell them. 

Any further Information regarding 
prices, etc., will be given by addressing 
F. E. WRIGHT, 
318 K. St., Sacramento, Cal. 



used, rough-finish it to prevent slip- 
ping and crippling. 

Wooden floors are too dry, and have 
an injurious effect upon the hoofs; be- 
side there is the ever present dan- 
ger of splintering. 

Idle horses should never be tied in 
the stalls; they should be provided 
with roomy box-stalls. Stallions, es- 
pecially, should always be placed in 
box-stalls. A clay floor, tamped down 
well, and then covered with cinders, 
makes an ideal floor for such stalls. 

Always place bedding toward the 
side and rear of the stall, as a horse 
lies well backward and on its side. 
Should the horse kick and scratch 
the straw too far back, place a coarse 
cocoanut-fiber mat under the straw 
about where the hocks of the horse 
lie, and there will be no further 
trouble. Otherwise, the hocks may be 
capped and injured. 

o 

Beauty and uniformity have a value, 
even though they do not add to the 
milk-yields. 

Too many dairy-cows are being 
made useless through the excessive 
work they are called upon to do 
through a short, forced test. 

After providing plenty of windows, 
a coat of whitewash will add greatly 
to the light of the stables. 

We need to give the dairy -bull plenty 
of exercise, and the best of treatment, 
that we may keep him until he has had 
an opportunity to show his worth. 



TRIANGLE TRIP 

OVER THE 

Northwestern Pacific Railroad 

One of the most delightful scenic 
one-day jaunts in America. 

1.50 miles of Mountain and Redwood For- 
est Scenery, a Boat Ride on San 
Francisco Bay and by rail along 
the Russian River. 

Leave San Francisco 7:45 A. M. dally 
except Sunday, and 8:46 A. M. Sunday 
only, by boat across the Bay of San 
Francisco, in full view of the Golden 
Gate to Sausalito (the Sorrento of 
America). Thence via picturesque San 
Rafael and thriving Petaluma (home of 
the chicken industry), through Sonoma 
Valley to Santa Rosa and Fulton. From 
Fulton, through magnificent mountain 
scenery and redwood forests and along 
Russian River, to Monte Rio. Return 
is made along the coast, passing To- 
males Bay, Point Reyes, San Anselmo, 
etc., to Sausalito, arriving at San Fran- 
cisco 7:35 P. M. dally the same evening. 

If preferred, trip can be reversed, 
leaving San Francisco at 8:16 A. M. via 
the coast to Monte Rio and returning 
along the river and through the val- 
leys, arriving at San Francisco 7:36 
P. M. dally except Sunday and 7:05 
P. M. Sunday the same evening. 

Round Trip Fare for Triangle Trip. $2.80, 
except on Fridays or Saturdays, it is $2.60 
and on Sundays only $2.20. 
Tickets on sale at 874 Market Street (Flood Bldg.) 
and Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office. 



KEEP IT! 
HANDYI 

You can never tell when a horse I 
la going to develop a Curb, Splint, [ 
Hpaviu Klngtmiie or a lament?**. 
Yet It Is bound to happen sooner 
or later. And you can't afford to 
keep it i m in the baru. Keep a bottle of 

Kendall's Spavin Cure 

handy at all times. John Bayer of 324 Rronson^ 
Avenue, Ottawa, Ont.. writes : I would not be 
without Kendall's Spavin Cure at any cost. 

It.lw a priceless liniment for 
^~ both man and beast. 
Get Kendall's Spavin 
Cure at any druggist's. 
81 per bottle— 6 for 15. 
"Treatise on the Horse" 
—free— or write to 

Dr. B.J. KENDALL CO. 
Unosburg Fills, Vt., U.S.A. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Mann snore at 
Tlburon and vicinity. Fishing TacUe to let and 
Bait always on hand. First-olass boats at reas- 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat riouaa, 

Capt. F. Wm. Ehbke. Prop., Tlburon, Oal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market St., 




Army Auction Sale Bargains 



-ii.... 

R'pi', Kill.. I. IS • 
Shc.lLn.ni... LM 1 
tuuks .Ill' 
es S.IHM 



Uniforms;.. 

Unias, ri 



,»i.iii..i. i 

. .xu •- I 

»)i.s; •■ 



talopns with 1912 .Mr-pl.ment 400 pages, 
.ncvclopetUn illti-tr.tion. 
l..fS3.»i..i.p.. FRANCIS BANNERMAN 



.jatwj 



LMUitaCT Go"ds from Gov't Auc*'on. 601 Broadway. 1«. Y . 



GomhauIVs 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds Greatest ana Surest 

&■§ Veterinary Remedy $■ 

HAS IMITATORS BUT MO COMPETITORS I 



SAFE, SPEEDY AND POSITIVE. 

Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
ing. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

WIND PUFFS, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

SKIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE, 

PINK EYE, 

SWEENY, 

BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS, 
SCRATCHES, 
POLL EVIL, 
PARASITES. 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
BLEMISHES, 
SPLINTS. 
CAPPED HOCK, 
STRAINED TENDONS. 

SAFE FOR ANYONE TO USE. 



We guarantee that one tablespoon ful of Canstlo 
Bal.-am will produce more actual results than a whole 
bottle of any liniment or spavin mixture ever made 
Every bottle sold la warranted to give satisfaction 
Write for testimonials showing what the most promt 
nent horsemen say of It. l*rice, SSI. per bottle. 
Sold by druggists, or sent by express, charges: pald f 
with full directions for its use. 

The Accented Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Reliable. 

Sure In Results. 




SoUJmporlcK&J'rcprirtfirsfartlxe 1 „, _ 

U.S.& CANADAS. /CLEVELAND, 



nothing urT good results. 

BnMl GOMBAVLT'S CAUSTIC BALSAM for mors 
Ithan 20 year,. It i. tho best blist«r I have ever tried I h.iv. 
MM it in hundred. u« case, with beat result,. It I, per- 
Ifectly .aft. for the most ine* perienrcd person tou<" Tin. 
• ijthe largest breeding .stil.lislini-nt of trotting horiM in 
MM world, and its. your blister often.— tV. H. l!A,linM>, 
ll-rop. Belmont I'ark Mock K.rm, Belmont ra.k, Mont. 



csfd to yfat:<5 srcrnssFrri.T. 

Ihavou.ed COM nil - IT'S CAl'STIC BALSAM for ton I 

I fears : have been very successful in curing curh, ringbone, I 
capi^-d hock, and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism , and al- 
most every cause of lameness in horses Have astaMsof | 
forty head, in..stly track and speedway horses, and cer- 
tainly can recnn.mend it.— f. C. I K A *1 1 It, Training I 
Stable.. 990 Jennings Street. New York City. 



Sole Agents tor the United States and Canada. 

The Lawrence-Wiifiams Co, 



TORONTO, ONT, 



CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



SAVE-THE-HORSE 



TRADE 
MARK 



REG'T. 





JUST NOTE THE KIND OF WORK THIS HORSE DOES IN 5 DAYS' 

TIME. 

Troy Chemical Company, Hinghamton, N. Y.: 

Dear Sirs: I have used your remedy now for five days and must say it is 
wonderful; did not expect any such results. The horse had not been able to put her 
heels to the ground and when she walked she would barely touch her toe to the 
ground and then jump with the other foot. I gave her the first treatment Sunday 
noon and when I went in the stable Monday morning she was still resting the 
foot, but when I made her stand over she put the foot plumb on the ground, and bore 
her weight on it; then I took her out and she walked on it very well. I put her 
in the team Thursday afternoon and vent in the woods after a load 'if wood, and 
got in a place where they had to do their best or stay there. She lifted as hard 
as ever 1 saw her. I expected to see her lame next morning, but she was not. 
The trouble seemed to be in the lower part of the tendons of her hind leg. Under 
these conditions, how long shall I continue to treat her? 

Very truly, R. H. WILLIAMS. 

You will observe there was no fever or enormously swollen leg, nor laying 
up of the horse with this treatment. 



MAKES A TENDON AS STROXti AS A ROD OP STEEL. 



$5 



A 

Bottle 



With a binding contract to refund money or cure any 
case >!' Hone mill ling Spavin. ThnroiiRhpIn, Ringbone 
(except low), Curb. Splint, ('tipped 1 1 nek, \\ ImlpulV, 
Shoe Hoi!, injured 'I en tin UN mill all Lameneu. No scar 
or loss of hair. Horse works as usual. 



AT ALL 

HMD. 



RRIGGISTS AND DEM. Kits OH EXPRESS 



TROY CHEMICAL CO., BIXGHAMTOX, N\ Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 

56 Bayo Vista Avenue. Oakland, Cal. 251 Keayy Street, San Francisco, Cad. 

ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awning, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 

Phone Kearny 2030. 303 Davis St, San Franclaoo, Cal. 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1* 



SPECIAL ADVERTISING. 



Wanted, For Sale, and Miscellaneous advertis- 
ing under this head will be set in nonpareil 
type (same type below) and will be published at 
the rata o( 2 cents per word each insertion, or 6 
cents per word by the month. Count each abbre- 
viation and initial as a word. 



RED COCKERS FOR SALE— Handsome 
pedigreed bitch. 3 years old. and a 5 months' old 
puppy. A bargain. For particulars address 
George Van Horn. Redwood City. Phone. 285 Y. 

STUD HOOK FOR SALE. — Volumes 1, 
2. S, 4, 5 and 6 of Bruce's American Stud 
Book: handsomely bound; good as new. 
Will be sold cheap. Address Breeder 
■anil Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. 

FOR SALE. — Percheron Stallion 

(grade, 4 years old, bay, absolutely 
sound, good disposition, and sure foal 
getter; weighs 1S00 pounds. I have 
seven of his weanlings to show how he 
breeds. Price $1000. For further par- 
ticulars address J. E. MONTGOMERY, 
Davis, Cal. 

FOR SALE, CHEAP— The best bred mare 
in California. Bay filly, 3 years old; sound. 
With 6 weeks' work paced a mile in 2:20 to a 
cart and had just 2:00 speed. Sired by Nutwood 
Wilkes; 1st dam by Bonnie Direct 2:05)4; 2nd 
dam by Searchlight 2 :03V»; 3rd dam by Director: 
4th dam Lida \V . dam of Nutwood Wilkes by 
Nutwood 600. Bred by Martin Carter, Nutwood 
Stock Farm. Address T. W. BARS TOW, 1042 
Alameda Ave.. San Jose, Cal. 



FOR SALE, CHEAP — One registered 
stallion, sired by McKinney 2:11%; 8 
years old; sound. Also one imported 
draft registered stallion; weight 1800 
pounds; 7 years old. Would consider 
trade on heavy mare or standard-bred 
mares, or fillies. Breeding and pictures 
sent to interested parties. Address D. 
V. BAKER, Bill P. O., San Diego, Cnl. 

FOR SALE. — Handsome seal brown 
stallion, 6 years old, weighs 1200 
pounds. Has paced a quarter in 30 
seconds. He is an inbred Electioneer 
and is a sure foal getter. Purchaser 
can see li is colts. Also black Perc- 
heron stallion. 9 years old, weighs 
1700 pounds. Handsome and sure foal 
getter. The above horses will be sold 
cheap. For price and particulars, ap- 
ply to C'onlon Bros, Ranch, San I'ablo 
Ave, near County Line. Postoffice ad- 
dress, R. F. D. 1, Berkeley, Cal. 



STANDARD Mc-KIWEY STALLION 
FOB SALE — Scott McKinney 33749, by 

McKinney, dam Primrose (great brood 
mare) by Sidney; second dam Brown 
Rose by Privateer; third dam Lady 
Baldwin by The Moor; fourth dam 
daughter of Ben Lippincott, son of 
Williamson's Belmont. Scott McKin- 
ney is a handsome bay horse; weighs 
about 1100; good gaited, and all his 
get are fine individuals and show 
speed. Price $500. Has State license 
for this year. Address DR. M. F. 
^ CM ALTEN BRANDT, 4051 20th St., San 
Francisco. 

FOR SALE — ZOBLACK 2:18, pacing 
as a two-year-old; trotting 2:24y 2 as a 
three-year-old: trial 2:19. He is a coal 
black stallion, five years old, stands 15.3 
hands, weighs 1200, and one of the best 
made stallions in California. He should 
get a record of 2:12 or better this year. 
18 kind and gentle and is a half brother 
to the great trotter Zomblack 2:26%, 
that worked last fall in 2:08% for his 
owner, R. J. MacKenzie, and will be on 
the circuit this season. Zoblack is a 
standard and registered horse, his pa- 
pers having just been sent for. He was 
sired by Zolock 2:05% (one of the best 
speed producing sons of McKinney 
2:11 1/4) and his dam is Madeleine Mar- 
shall by Demonio 2:11, second dam that 
great broodmare Mamie Comet 2:23 '4 
by Nutwood 2:18%. He will be sold at 
a reasonable figure as the farm I have 
leased has been sold and I am com- 
pelled to get a new place. This is my 
only reason for selling Zoblack and the 
following: 

TWENTY-THREE SKIDDOO, stand- 
ard and registered black mare, foaled 
1906, sired by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16y 2 , 
dam Twenty-Third (dam of Sterling 
McKinney 2:06',4) by Director 2:17, sec- 
ond dam Nettle Nutwood (dam of Hills- 
dale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%, third dam 
by Vick's Ethan Allen Jr.. fourth dam 
by Williamson's Belmont. This mare 
i« a fine sized, well made ti otter, gen- 
tle, but has never be. n worked for 
speed. She is bred to be as fast as any. 

STAR POINTER, filly (4), out of Trix 
(dam of Aerolite 2:07%, Mona Wilkes 
2:03% and four others) by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:lfiV4. etc. This is a nice big 
mare, stands 15.3 hands and is a free- 
legged pacer, was handled a little as a 
two and three-year-old. She was both- 
ered with splints, so I did not work her. 
They have disappeared, and, as she 
never gave a lame step, they must 
never have been near a cord or tendon. 
From her breeding sh^ should make one 
of the greatest of broodmares. 

Dan Logan Ally (3) out of the stand- 
ard and registered mare Sophia (dam 
of Sophia Direct, p. 2:23%, and Corona 
2:27) by Robt. McGregor 2:17%; second 
dam Orawood by Wildwood 14 1, third 
dam Ladv Utterback by Mamhrino 
Patcben Jr. Dan Logan, her sire, had 
a trial of 2:12 and is a full brother to 
the champion Jim Logan 2:05%. This 
filly is a pure-gaited trotter, just been 
broken and will undoubtedly be a fast 
mare. Her breeding can hardly be ex- 
celled. For prices and further partlcu- 
lars address J. W. Marshall, Dixon, 
Cal. 



FOR SALE. — The trotting stallion 
Altitude 2:22; seal brown; fine Indiv- 
idual: sound and gentle. For terms, 
etc . address CHAS. THOMPSON, R. F. 
R. D. No. 3, Rakersneld, Cnl. 

for sale — Fonr-year-old Ally (full 
sister to Celia K., trial at Stadium 
2:10%). By Arner 2:17%, dam by Di- 
rect 2:05%; second dam Carrie S., by 
Mamhrino Wilkes. She is a jet black, 
weighs about 1000 lbs.; handsome, 
strong, rugged, and sound. Just broken 
and shows speed, and if properly han- 
dled, will undoubtedly be as fast as her 
sister. I will exchange her for a good 
sound surrey animal weighing from 
1100 to 1200 lbs. H. OLSEV, 5014 E. 
1Kb St., Oakland, Cnl. 

FOR SALE — Halley Wilkes, black 
mare by Count Wilkes 2:21; dam by 
Orator, grandson of Electioneer. An 
ideal road mare, trots good road gait; 
paces when at speed, free legged; uses 
no boots. With one month's training 
paced quarter mile In 34% seconds, 
half mile in 1:12 on half-mile track. 
Also three and four-year-old fillies out 
of the same mare by Dictatus 2:17. For 
price and particulars address W. S. 
CLARK, Gustine Stock Farm, Gustlne, 
Cal. 



FOR SALE — Lady Derby (formerly 
known as the Schottler mare); five- 
year-old, by Chas. Derby 2:20; dam 
(dam of Judge Green 2:09) by Anteeo 
Jr. 2:25%; second dam bv Geo. M. 
Patchen Jr. 2:27. Stands 16.1 hands; 
weighs 1100 lbs. A fine, rangy, trot- 
ting mare, absolutely gentle and not 
afraid of anything. Price $200 — cheap! 
Sound. One of the finest driving mares 
in this State; trotted as a two-year-old. 
quarters in 37 seconds to a business 
buggy. Has all the qualities to make 
a great brood mare. Can be seen at 
Kellev's Stables, 1629 Pine st. For fur- 
ther particulars, address J. R. FREE- 
MAN. 322 Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cnl. 



Sunset Limited 



An entirely new luxuriously furnished, 
vacum cleaned, steel car train 

From San Francisco 6:00 p. m. Tuesdays 
and Fiidays through Los Angeles and 
El Paso to New Orleans in 70 hours via 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Connecting at New Orleans with " New 
Orleans-New York Limited" for Atlanta, 
Baltimore, Washington, and New York; 
Illinois Central, Seaboard Air Line, 
Louisville & Nashville and other lines 
for St. Louis, Cincinnati, Chicago and 
Atlantic Coast Cities, as well as New Or- 
leans-New York SS Line for New York 
direct. 

Dinner service unequaled by the finest 
hotels or restaurants. Parlor observa- 
tion car with library, ladies' parlor, buf- 
fet, latest magazines and newspapers. 

Stenographer, barber, valet, shower 
bath, ladies' maid, manicure. Cour- 
teous and attentive employees. Excess 
fare $10.00. 

Write or call on our nearest agent for in- 
formation and reservations. 

CHARLES JAMES. 

Public Training Stable 

l'leasanton Race Track, 
Plcnsnnton, Cnl. 

Trotters and pacers trained at rea- 
sonable rates for this season's cam- 
paign. Best of care given. Developed 
and drove the following better than 
2:13 In 1911: Prof. Heald 2:09%, Cresto 
2:12%, Bodaker 2:13, Merrylena 2:23 
(miles in 2:12) and Reina Directum, 
matinee, 2:11, over the Stadium track. 
These are all trotters. Address 
CHARLES JAMES, 

Pleasanton, CaL 
CHAS. WHITEHEAD'S 

Public Training Stable 

Pleaaanton Race Track 
PLEAS ANTON, CAL. 

Horses and colts trained at reason- 
able rates for next season's campaign. 
Best of care given. Developed and 
campaigned successfully the Futurity 
stake winners North Star 2:11%, Delia 
Derby 2:11% and many others. Address 

CHAS, W 111 I Till. VI), Plenannton, Cal. 



Ewes should be two years old be- 
fore being bred. 



The Finest Winter Training Track in 
America. 



— THH— 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 

There are about 50 box stalls in first- 
class shape, newly roofed, and ready for 
occupancy. Horsemen who intend to 
campaign their horses next season should 
not delay too long if they want to pre- 
pare them on this track, which is uni- 
versally acknowledged to be the safest 
and best in existence. These stalls will 
not be vacant long. For further par- 
ticulars apply to 

H. E. ARMSTRONG, 

Proprietor. 

HOMEPHONE PRAISED. 

A new subscriber writes the Home 
Telephone Company under date of Oc- 
tober 28, 1911: 

"Please install a phone at my home. 
I did not know anything about the good 
points of the Homephone and was 
rather prejudiced against it until I be- 
gan using it In my office. I use it all 
the time now, not only in phoning 
around the building, but getting outside 
numbers, because it saves me time and 
trouble. The Homephone delivers the 
goods. 

"You know the burners of candles 
rioted in London about 500 years ago 
when gas was Introduced. Most of us 
object to changes. Possibly that is the 
reason why I am so late in ordering a 
Homephone." 

BAY CITIES 
HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 
333 Grant Ave.. San Francisco. 

SMITH'S WONDER WORKER 



Registered 



MakesThem 
Sound 

A Positive 
Cure for 
Blemishes 
of all kinds. 




Keeps Them 
Sound 

Soreness 
from any 
cause reliev- 
ed like magic 



Trade Mark 

Endorsed by Horsemen the world over as the 
BEST remedy for Bowed. Strained and Rup- 
tured Tendons, Weak Joints, Cording Up, Buck 
Shins. Shoulder, Hip and Stifle Lameness and 
Rheumatism. As a Leg and Body Wash it has 
no equal. %2 per bottle prepaid, $16 per dozen, 
$10 per gallon F. O. B. Tiffin. At all harness- 
makers and druggists. W. K. SMITH. Tiffin. 
Ohio. 

WM. E. DETELS, 

Pacific Coast Agent. Pleasanton. Cal. 

The Largest Place of Its Kind West of Chioago! 



G. Lindauer 

Proprietor. 

UNION LIVERY and SALE STABLES 

Work Horses to Let. 
Country Horses for Sale. 

Horses and mules bought and sold 

122-124 Clara St., bet. Fourth and Fifth, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phone Kearny 659. Home J 2643. 

Special attention paid to the purchase and 
shipment of horses and mules to foreign and 
domestic ports. 

PUBLIC TRAINING STABLE. 

DICK WILSON 

Of Plaasanton 

Announces he will train a few good 
"prospects" for outside owners this 
winter and prepare them for next sea- 
son's campaign at very reasonable 
rates. Mr. Wilson has given 16 horses 
race records of 2:10 or better. 61 with 
records of 2:15 or better, besides giv- 
ing the double team Hedgewood Boy 
and Ijady Maud C. the world's record 
to pole of 2:02%, besides winning many 
races with them. Address DICK WIL- 
SON, It nee Trnrk, IMenannton, Cnl. 

BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

J. S. Phippen 

Is now located on the A. J. Clunle 
farm, adjacent to the celebrated Palo 
Alto Farm, at Mayfleld, where he Is 
prepared to keep a few horses through 
the winter. He has line box stalls and 
padtlocks and can take the best of 
care of all sent him. He Is also pre- 
pared to break colts either for city 
use or racetrack. His lifelong expe- 
rience In this branch of the business 
has fitted him to do this work care- 
fully and well. He takes pleasure In 
referring to all for whom he has ever 
worked. Address J. S. PHIPPEN, Mny- 
fleld, Cal. 



PALACE 

HOTEL 

ENTIRELY REBUILT 
JINCE THE FIRE 

Far famed and first 
named wherever good 
hotels are mentioned. 

Recognized as the headquarter or 
the businessmen of the world. 
The place where you always find 
your friends. 

European plan only. 

Management 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

M FRANCI5C0 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to glvs the belt of profes- 
sional service! to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated oases treated suc- 
cessfully Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prloee 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

• 10 Ootavla St., between Fulton and Oroya. 

Phona Market 3074. San Franoiaoo, Cal. 

WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1155 Golden Gate Av« 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster ana (Jhestnu 

Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

traine 
for 
Business 
and places 
its graduates 
In positions. 



Call or writ* 

4X5 McAllister st. 

San Frandico. 



Blake, Moffit & Town* 

Dealer* In PAPER 

37-1st St., San Praneiaeo, Cal. 

Blake. MoflH <& Towne. Los Angelas. 

Blake. McFall <Si Co., Portland. Ora. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art In 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artiatlo Designing 
121 Second St., Sen Pranolseo 



Ynn Pan'* Puff fliif a noo spAvurrrrrr 

TOU udll I UUI UUI „r I1IOKOI (.lll'IN, hat 



/VBSORBINE 



will clean I ben "IT permanent ly, and you 
work I ho horso aamo tlmo. I)ooa not 
Dilator or remove tho hair, 12.00 per 
boil), .le'iver.-d. Ilook I i: free 

AUSOKHINK. .lit., llnlmonl for 
mankind, roducce Varicose Volna. Ilup- 
turod Muscles or I.lKninxnti. Hnlarirod 
Htfora Altar (Hands, Oollrcs, Wens, Cysts. Allaya 
pnln quickly. 1'rlcoll.UOand E.OO a bot- 
tlo at dniKiflsts or delivered. Will toll you more 
If you write. Manufuclurod only by 

YV.F YOUNG, P.D.F., 54 Temple St„Sprlnofleld,MiM. 

For sal* by Langlay A Mlchaalt, Run Fraaclfoo, Calif.; 
Woodward. Clark * Co . Portland, Ora.; F. W Braaa 0*., 
R ran. wig Draff Co., Woatarn Wholaaala Drug Ca., Laa Aa- 

Ellaa, Calif . Kirk. Claary A Co . Bacramanto. Calif . ra«ll« 
rug Co., Baattla, Waah., Spokaaa Drar Jo.,Bpokana,Waaa. 
Coffin, Redlngton Co.. San Francisco. Cal. 




14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912. 



^Clip Your Horses 




C I i ppcd horses 
work better, feel 
better, look bet- 
ter, and are worth more than undipped horses. Clip off the thick, heavy 
coat that holds sweat and dirt. Clipped horse dry quickly, rest well and get more 
good Irom iheirlood. They come out refreshed and look and wurk better. 

This Stewart Ball Bearing Clipping Machine 

is at knowtedfred In every civilized country t'n earth as the finest outfit ever d* Tj 
rhorsc lipptaff. It has all file hard cut steelgears, enclosed, pro- «P§_J).«)' 

c . _ 

easiest, dips las'.esl, lasts longest. Guaranteed lor » years. 1 plete, ceilU I OuaY 

Get one now at your dealers or send for our big, new catalogue 
CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY, 201 Ontario St., CHICAGO 




TWO GREAT SIRES. 



The Bondsman 




Reg. No. 37641 

SIRE OF 

Colorado E. (3) 2:04|, ^? d "£ 

the world. Winner of the Matron. American 
Horse Breeder and Kentucky Stock Farm Fu- 
turities: second in Kentucky Futurity. 

The Plunger (4) 2:07i ^,55: 

old stallion of 1910. 

Grace Bond (3) 2:0!*, 

Kentucky Futurity. 

Creighton 2:08|, record made ,n ml - 

and 31 others. 

Half brother to Jay Hawker 2:14*5, sire of Country Jay 2:05%, Susie Jay 2:06 , / 4, 
etc. 

Half brother to The Tramp, sire of Bervaldo 2:08%, Trampfast (2) 2:12V4. 
Half brother to Sorrento Todd (4) 2:14%, Belle Sentinel 2:15, etc. 



BARO\ WILKES 2:18.. 

Sire of 12 in 2:10, In- 
cluding Bumps 2:03%, 
Rubenstein 2:05, Bar- 
on May 2:07% ; sired 
dams of 4 in 2:10. 



GEORGE WILKES 2:22 

Sire of 83, dams of 204. 



BELLE PATCHEN 2:30% 

In great brood mare list. 



SORRENTO 

Dam of Jay Hawker 
2:14%, Sorrento Todd 
(4) 2:14%, Belle Sen- 
tinel 2:15, Eola 2:19%, 
Lazy Bird 2:26%, Ted- 
dy Sentinel, 2:29%, The 
Tramp (sire), etc. 

4th dam Virgie — by Abdallah 15. 

5th dam Lucy — by Highlander (Veech's). 



Gil \ M> SENTINEL 

2:21) '4 

Sire of 23, Including Nel- 
lette 2:16%, Tosca 
2:18%. 



EMPRESS 

Dam of 2 and grandam 
of 9. 



II \ >l ML ETONIAN 10 

Sire of 40. 

DOIX1 SPANKER 

Dam of 1. 
HAMBRINO PATCHEN 
58. 

Sire of 25. dams of 162. 

SALLY CHORISTER 
By Mamb. Chorister, 
dam of 2 in 2:20, etc. 

SENTINEL 280 

Sire of 8 in list. 

MAID OF LEXINGTON 
By Mamb. Pilot 29. 

Mil) \ I.I. All M VMMMINO 

Sire of 15, dams of 42. 
BIG ELLEN 

By Clark Chief. 



THE BONDSMAN is the only stallion that sired three new 2:10 performers 
with race records in 1910. In spite of the fact that he has no record, The Bonds- 
man was a colt trotter of great merit. He was a contending colt all through the 
Kentucky Futurity of 1899. getting third money. This was a six-heat race and was 
won by Boraima. As a four-year-old he was not raced, but trotted a public trial 
In 2:11. As a sire he is destined to be thi leading son of the great Baron Wilkes, 
founder of the greatest futurity winning family. 

He will make the season of 1912 at 



Pleasanton Training Park. $100 



the Season with usual 
return privilege 1918. 
Season ends June 1st. 



THE PATCHEN BOY 39033 

Three-Year-Old Record 2:10', in a Winning Race. 

Sired by the Great WILKES BOY 3803, sire of 107 in standard time. 

A Ganulne Race Horse and a Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 

The Patchen Boy 39033 is sire of the following: 



Francis J 2:08 

Evelyn Pa tchen. . .2:10% 
Scott Patchen ...2:12% 
Dessie Patchen ..2:13 
Frank Patchen ..2:13% 
Rubv Patchen ...2:13% 
J. C. Patchen 2:14% 



Legal Patchen ...2:15% 
Lucile Patchen ..2:16 
Jerrv Patchen ...2:16% 
Knightstown Belle2:16% 
Alec Williams . . .2:18% 
Lois Patchen ....2:19% 
Auduous the Miller2:19% 



Dorothy C 2:19% 

Louise Patchen ...2:19% 

Dr. Warren 2:19% 

Roscoe Binning ..2:20 

Marv Patchen 2:20% 

Black Patchen ..2:20% 
and 11 others in 2:30. 



Dam Lady Clay, the dam of The Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%, C. W. M. 2:24% 
(trotted to high wheels), Anglin Wilkes 2:16% over half-mile track, trial 2:09%, 
by Metropolitan 1372. son of Hambletonian 10; second dam, Haggie Brown, by 
Ashland Clay; third dam. Pitty Pat. thoroughbred. The Patchen Boy was the 
greatest three-year-old race colt In the world, winning six straight races in the 
Grand Circuit the only year he was raced. His produce are good-headed and real 
race horses (No tin cups.) 

THE PATCHES BO) is a beautiful black. 16.1 hands and weighs 1290 pounds. 
Ills colts are of fine size, great individuals and the kind that sell for the high 
dollar 



Season of 191 2 at Pleasanton Training Park. Fee: 



$50 ' 



privilege 1913 

Both of the Above Horses Will Rem in in California. 

Best of care and attention given mares, but no responsibility assumed for 
accidents. Good pasturage at reasonable rates. For further particulars and full 
tabulated pedigree, address 

(HAS. L. DE RYDER, PletiNiintoii, (ill. 
A Choice Collection of Kcnlnrky Saddle H Or net. for Sale. 

THE STANDARD TROTTING STALLION 

AIRLIE DEMON. O 51640 

Stands about 16 hands, handsome, sound, without blemish, stylish, fine in- 
dividual in every respect. Sired by Demonio 2:11% (sire of Mono Wilkes 2:03%, 
Denervo 2:06%, Nordwell 2:08%, Memonlo 2:09%, Demonio Wilkes 2:09%, Ben 
Rush (3) 2:10%, etc., etc.), dam Potrero Girl bv Prince Airlle 28045; second dam 
Moscova 2:28% (dam of Mamie R. (3) 2:15%, 6ro Belmont 2:15%, La Moscovita. 
dam of Frank N. 2:07%, Bon Guy (3) 2:11%. etc.). by Belmont 6 1; next dam Mosa 
(dam of 5 in the list), by Woodford Mambrino 345; next dam Hermosa (great 
brood mare), by Edwin Forrest. 

Will make the season of 1912 at 

CITY STABLES, WOODLAND, CAL. 

FEE, $30 TO INSURE. Usual return privilege. Good pasturage $2.50 per 
month. Best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed for accidents or 
escapes. Address CHARLES JOHNSON, Woodland, Cnl. Phone 40. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



W. F. WHITTIER. Pres. 



BUDD DOB LE, Vice-Pras. and Manager. 



HEMET STOCK FARM 

(Incorporated) 

Home of the World's Champion Yearling Trotting Stallion 

Wilbur Lou 2:19 



Stallions In Service for the Season of 1912: 

Kinney de Lopez (4) 2:23 

Son of Kinney Lou 2:07^— 37tV.il— and Betsy Direct by Direct 2:05%. 

TERMS: $50. 

Geo. W. McKinney 2:14 



Reg. No. 
49954 



1 Reg. No. 

i 35573 



Son of McKinney 2:llK and Lady Washington. Sire of Silver Dick (p) 2:09%. etc. etc. 
TERMS: $30 for the Season. 



Armond Lou 2:27 



Son of Kinney Lou 2:07% and Catinka (p) 2:20. Sire of Harry R., p (1) 2:24%. Ex. 
hibition mile, 1-8 in 15 seconds; officially timed. 

TERMS: $25. 

Cash at time of service with usual return privilege or money refunded at our option. 
Excellent pasturage and best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed for accidents 
or escapes. For further information apply to or address 

HEMET STOCK FARM, 

Hemet, California. 



BON VOYAGE 2 



Fastest Heat by a Trotting 
Stallion in a Race in 
California. 



A Futurity Winner 

that sires 
Futurity Winners! 

At 9 years old, sire of 
Jean Valjean(3).2:10 
Winner California 
Breeders' Stake. 
Bon Vivant (3) .2:10% 

Bon Guy (3) 2:11% 

Winner of California 
Breeders' Stake and 
Stanford Stake. 
Sweet Bow (2) ..2:17% 
Winner 2-y.-o. Division 
Pacific Breeders' Fu- 
turity. 




Phyllis Wvnn(4)2:15 
Bon Volonte (3). 2:19% 
Voyageur (3)... 2:23% 

Ulattis (4) 2:24% 

Bonaletta (3)... 2:24% 

On Voyage 2:25 

Le Voyage (3) . .2:25% 
Bonaday (2) ...2:27% 
Winner Oregon Breed- 
ers' Stake. 
BonMcKinney (3)2:24% 
Viaticum (2) . . .2:29 
Manager (2) . . .2:30 

FEE: $75 for the Season. 



Reg. No. 39813 



Champion Two-Yenr-OId 
Trotter 1004. 
Record 2:15. 

Cluiniplon Three - Year - 
Old Trotter 1005. 
Record 2:13%. 

I.nrncst Honey Winning 
Two anil Tliree-Year- 
Old of IlioNe yearM. 



One of the best bred 
trotting stallions in 
early speed producing 
lines in the world. Sired 
by Expedition 2:15%, 
best son of the great 
Electioneer 125, dam 
Bon Mot, dam of 2 two- 
year-olds in 2:15 and 3 
two-year-olds in 2:20, bv 
Erin 2:24%. 

Send for tabulated 
pedigree. 



BON VOLONTE (3) 2:19|— Reg. No. 50398. T, ™ d ke '? n ,f« 

Sired by BON VOYAGE; dam Missic Medium, registered, (dam of 2 standard performers) by 
Rampart 29:t0; next dam Belle Medium (great brood mare) by Happy Medium 400. 

A grand young horse and exceptionally well bred. Fee: $26 for the Season. 

Will make the Season of 1912 at the 

NEW EXPOSITION PARK AND FAIR GROUNDS, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Good pasturage and the best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed for acci- 
dents or escapes Mares failing to get with foal may be returned the following season free of 
charge. Por extended pedigrees and further particular apply to or address 

TED HAYES, 8818 S. Vermont Ave.. Los Angeles. Cal. 



Aerolite 2:07 



1 2-year-old Record 2:I5£ 

2 3-year-old Record 2:1 \\ 



Sire of Ruby Light (3) 2:11%, Aeroletta (2) 2:21, and Leonid, second to her in 2:21. 

By SearelilinI.I 2:(!3Vi ; dam. Trlx by Nutwood Wilkes 2:l«Vi, sire of John A. 
McKerron 2:04%, Copa de Oro 1:59. Happy Dentist 2:05%, Nutmoor 2:06%, Prof. 
Hcald 2:09%. Tidal Wave 2:06%. Miss Idaho 2:0'.|i,, etc. 

Dam Trlx, dam of Mona Wilkes 2:03% and 3 others all by different sires that 
have beaten 2:15; second dam Trixy by Director 2:17; third dam Mischief (dam 
of Brilliant, sire of BriUiantine 2:17Vi) by Young Tuckahoe 2:28%, son of Flax- 
tail; fourth dam Lide by Flaxtail; fifth dam by Peoria Blue Bull; sixth dam 
Fanny Fern by Irwin's Tuckahoe, and seventh dam by Leffler's Consul (Thor.). 

Will make a short Season at PLEASANTON, CAL 

FEE! $50 for the SeaSOn. For further particulars apply to 

C. L. CIFFORD, Owner. Sutherland & Chadbourne, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 




WM. HAROLD 2:13 \ 



■j By Sidney 2:19 , 
Dam 
Cricket 2:10 



Sire of Frank N. 2:07)4. Janice 2:0% The Iceman 2:10. etc. 
Season 1912. $5 at first service; $20 when mare proves 



Apply or address 



with foal. 

JAS. D. JOHNSTONE, 

Elmhurst. Alameda Co., Cal. 



Saturday, February 3, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



IB 



The Man Who has Come Back. 

The host of admirers of what the veteran war horse of the shooting game — The 
Hon. T. Bill Crosby— has done lately with his 34-inch barrel Parker gun, will be 
glad to read the following, viz: 



In the Eastern Handicap 

In the Western Handicap 

In Evansville, Ind., Tournament 



100 out of 100 targets. 
492 out of 500 targets. 
395 out of 400 targets. 



Making a continuous run of 987 out of 1000 targets 

The only straight score ever recorded in the Grand American Handicap 
event was made with a Parker gun, scoring 100 out of 100 at 19 yards rise. Further- 
more the same Old Reliable has won the National Championship of America 

every year it has been shot for. 

For information regarding small bore guns, address the pioneer makers of the 



20 gauge 

PARKER BROS., 



Meriden, Conn, 



N. Y. Salesrooms, 32 Warren Street. 

Resident Agent: A. W. du Bray, P. O. Box 102, San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
A I° OUTFITTERS 
for the I 
SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER*!!? 
ATHLETE. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
A A D APPARATUS 

I FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



Get Your Stallion's Picture 

IN THE 

Breeders Special 
Number 

OF THE 

Breeder and Sportsman 

WILL BE PUBLISHED 

Saturday, March 9, 1912 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this Coast. 

IF YOU OWN A GOOD MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the 
beat stallions on the Coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a work of 



reference. 



AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers, and those who are interested in Field Sports, it will he 
particularly valuable. 



OWNERS OF STALLIONS 



who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. Write for price 
and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco. 



RESULT OF OVER A CENTURY'S EXPERIENCE. 




Perfection in powder-making is only achieved by exercising the most 
scrupulous care in the selection and preparation of raw materials, employing 
skilled workmen exclusively, and using only the most improved modern me- 
chanical equipment. 



This is the QU_P0Nj) method and accounts for the unequaled reputation 
among sportsmen enjoyed by the (§U_P0Nt) brands of 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

One of the most popular of these brands is 




A dense powder that is absolutely uniform in velocity and pattern. Water- 
proof — not ad'ected by extremes of heat or cold. " Infallible" SMOKELESS 
SHOTGUN POWDER will not pit the gun barrels. 

Unequaled for Field and Trap-Shooting. 

See that your shells are loaded with INFALLIBLE. 

Send to-day for Infallible Booklet No. !)9. It gives best loads for various kinds of game 
and other information of value to shooters. It's free. 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER COMPANY 
Established 1802. Pioneer Powder Makers of America. Wilmington, Dal. 



GOLCHER BROS. 



Camping 
Goods. 




Fishing 
Tackle. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 

510 Market St., San Francisco 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



Of San Francisco 



CAPITAL 
$3,000,000.00. 
SURPLUS AND PROFITS 
$1,500,000.00. 




!i#52« »■■ IN 



Rudolph Sprcckels, Pres. 
James K. Lynch. Vice-Pres. 
J. K. Moffltt. Cashier. 




Offers adequate banking 
service to mercantile firms, 
business men, professional 
men and banks. 



Post and Montgomery 



J. H. Skinner. Assistant-Cashier 
C. H. McCormick. " 
Geo. A. Kennedy, 



Hiree-Legged Horses' 

aro not curiosities by any means. The country is full of them. Th 
fourth let; is there all right but It is not worth anything because of a curb, 
splint, spavin or other like bund:. You can cure the horse of any of these 
ailments aud put another sound leg under him by the use of 

Quinn's Ointment. 

It Ih time tried and reliable. When a homo laenrod 
with vnliin'nOlntment ho Btava cured. Mr. E. K.llurko 
ofspniigtlcld, Jlo., wrltcaan fnllowfl "I havo hern 
lining Qulnn'a Olnlmant rorievenil yarn and havo ef- 
fected many ninrvoh.ua ouren; It will go deeper ami* 
.■in.-!, pain than any hllntor I ovor lined. Thought 
It my duty for th© benefit of horncn to recommond your 
Ointment lam never without It " Tlila la the general 
venllct by all who give Qulnn'a Olnimont » trial. Kor 
curba, Splints, apavina. madpuffs, and i 



In unequaled. 

tntbjni • 



la at all dmgglntfl 
, teatlmonlalH, Ac 



B. Eddy S. Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1912. 




AN UNBEATEN RECORD! 



TARGETS SHOT AT 
4280 



97.28 per cent 



TARGETS BROKEN 
4164 



This is the percentage with which Mr. J. S. Day won the 1910 OFFICIAL HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE — a percentage never 
equaled by an amateur and exceeding by exactly 1 per cent the figures of the 19] 1 winner, who, moreover, shot at only 2100 targets. 

Mr. Day's wonderful shooting was done with 

Peters FACTORY LOADED SHELLS 

The Lion's Share of the 1911 Amateur Honors 

Was also won with PETERS SHELLS, for they were used either exclusively or for the most of their shooting, by 5 out of the 10 High Amateurs. 



$ THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. pa^c*^»t^™ b »"™^ei^iS-« How^st"^ f 

✓ 



| 1 . *" Ken Olieanai 321 Magazine St., E. F. Leckert, Mgr. 




WINCHESTER 

Repeating Shotguns and Shotgun Shells 
WIN THE OFFICIAL AMATEUR SEASON'S AVERAGE. 

Dr. W. 8. Spencer of St. Louis, Mo., won the Interstate Association's con- 
test for The Amateur Season's Average for 1911. He shot at 2100 targets 
in various tournaments, scoring 96.28 per cent. In winning this great 
trap shooting honor Dr. Spencer shot a Winchester Repeating Shotgun 
and Winchester Shells. His record is conclusive proof of their strong and 
uniform shooting qualities. Dr. Spencer's victory and the winning of tlie 
Professional Season's Average for 1911 hy J. H. Taylor with a Winchester 
Repeating Shotgun and Winchester Shells, emphasizes the wisdom of 
shooting the make of guns and shells that always helps and never handi- 
caps skill. Their conspicuous winnings show that Winchester guns and 
shells are of this kind. 

THE WINCHESTER COMBINATION WAS SUPREME IN 1911. 




Velocity, Pattern, Penetration ! 

Thats why SELBY LOADS 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., San Francisco. 



Are Consistent Winners. 

Not only in 1911 but for years past Ihe Amateurs — the men who pay for their guns and am- 
munition—have shot SELBY LOADS and WON CONSISTENTLY at every 
shoot on the Pacific Coast. 

REMEMBER— WITH SELBY LOADS 

LOADED ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

ALWAYS FRESH, ALWAYS RELIABLE, BACKED BY THE SELBY GUARANTEE. 

"Special Loads at a Moment's Notice." 



ADVERTISE IN THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 
Breeder and Sportsman 





|£jMs&*-k. V :w'',',n. 




VOLUME LX. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1912. 



Subscription— $3.00 Per Yeai 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 10, 1912. 



$1,600 Guaranteed. 




CALIFORNIA BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Canfield - Clark Stake No. 4 

For foals of 1911 to trot and pace as 2-year-olds in 1913. 
$1,000 for Trotting Foals. $600 for Pacing Foals. 

TO BE GIVEN BY THE 

CALIFORNIA BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Entries to Close March 1, *12. 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS— March 1, 1912, $2 to nominate a foal; June 1, 1912, $5; 
Sept. 1, 1912, $5; Dec. 1, 1912, $10; March 1, 1913, $10; starting payments $15 for 
pacers, $25 for trotters, ten days before the meeting begins at which the races are to take place. 

CONDITIONS. 

The race will be one-mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by entrance fee 
Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to ma*ke any payment forfeits all previous payments. 
This Association is liable for $1600, the amount of the guarantee only. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory. 
Membership not reiiuired 1" chut. Owners must become members tH start. 
Money divided 50, 25, 15, 10 per cent. 

There will be no more moneys than there are starters. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry, rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Guaranteed $1,600. 



C. \. I WKIELD, President. 



Write for entry blanks and further information to 



E. J. DELOHBY, Secretary, 
8©5% South SprliiK St., I. .is Angelea, Cnl. 



MT. DIABLO CEMENT 

best for foundations, dairy floors, fruit dryer floors, etc. etc. 

SANTA CRUZ LIME 

best for bricklaying and plastering. 

MT. DIABLO LIME 

best for spraying and whitewashing. 
WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICES ON ALL BUILDINC MATERIAL. 

HENRY COWELL LIME & CEMENT COMPANY 

9 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Complete Dispersal Sale 

40 HEAD OF HIGHLY - OREO TROTTERS and PAGERS 



FROM THE FARM OF 

Mr. Geo. E. Stickle, Lockeford, Cal. 

AT CHASE'S PAVILION, 478 VALENCIA STREET, SAN FRAOCISCO 

MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 12, 1912, 

A 4-year-oKl stallion by Bon Voyage 2:08, out of the dam of Helen Stiles 2:08%. 
Brood mares by Stain B. 2:11%, Daedalion 2:08%, Diablo 2:09%, Mount 
Vernon 2:15%, Silver Bow 2:10, Stickle and other standard sires. 
Three, four, five and six-year-old fillies and geldings. 
All to be sold without reserve. 

These horses are all in good condition and some will weigh 1200 pounds and 
more. 

A number of good work stock and drivers — mares, geldings and mules — will be 
sold the same evening. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 

The Standard Trotting Stallion 

Bon McKinney 51480 

3-y. o. Rec. 2:24',. 3-y.-o. Trial— half, 1:05; mile, 2:15. 
By BON VOYAGE 2:08 

(fastest mile ever trotted in a race by a stallion in California): 

<lnm. Daphne MiKinncy (also clam of Frank N. 2:07'/i. the only other one of her 
get ever trained) by McKinney 2:11*4: second dam. I>a Moscovita (dam of Ron 
Guy, 3-y.-o., 2:11%, Yolande 2:14% and Tina 2:20V*) by Guy Wilkes 2:15»4: third 
dam, Moscova 2:28% (dam of Mamie R., 3-y.-o., 2:ir>%. and Oro Relmont 2:15%) 
by Relmont 61: fourth dam, Mosa (dam of 5 in the list) by Woodford Mambrino. 

BON HcKINNBl 51480 (3) 2:24'/i is a beautiful bay horse and Is in every 
respect a magnificent individual, possessing size, style, quality, intelligence and 
frictionless trotting action. With little work as a yearling he trotted a quarter 
in 35 seconds and a half in 1:15. The next spring as a two-year-old, with 2% 
months' work, he worked a mile in 2:19%, a half in DOS and a quarter in 33 
seconds. Having no stake engagements, he was taken out of training after mak- 
ing this wonderful showing for a two-year-old. There is no doubt he could have 
trotted a mile in 2:12 that year had he been worked until fall. As a three-year- 
old he was given a record of 2:24Vi, which is no mark of his speed. Mr. Ted 
Hayes trained him and says that he considers him the best colt he ever trained 
::ini tirinly believes that he will not only make a great race horse, but a great 
sire. As a two-year-old he was bred to ten mares and got nine foals, and every- 
one who has one of his get is confident that he has the best foal on the Coast. 
Ron McKinney combines the best of the .Electloneer-McKinney cross. His dams 
are all in the great brood mare list, every one being a producer of speed. He is 
a young horse and has already commenced to make his mark in the world, and 
now is the time to breed to him and take advantage to get something exceptionally 
good at a reasonable price. Study his pedigree, come and see him. and you will 
be sure to send your mare. 

Season of 1912 at the RACE TRACK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

TERMS: HMO for the Seawm. Dsual return privilege. 

Good pasturage and the best of care taken of mares in any manner that 
owners may desire at reasonable rates, but no responsibility assumed for acci- 
dents or scapes. Address JOK. TWOHIG, ManiiKt-r, Ilm* Truck, Sun Jonc, Cnl. 




Spring Combination Sale 

FRED H. CHASE & CO. 



announce the date of 



Monday, Evening', March 18, '12, 

FOR THE 

FIRST BIG COMBINATION SALE 



OF THE YEAR. 



The Market is Good. 



Make Your Consignments Early. 



Write for Entry Blanks. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO. 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco 



JERALD'S 

Latest and Best Sulky 



NOTHING BETTER AT ANY 
PRICE. 




A JERALD SULKY was drawn 
by the fastest green pacer in 1911, i 
also by the fastest four-year-old 
Gelding in L911, who also won the 
fastest six-heat race of the season. 
Take advantage of our special | 
winter offer and save money. 

$60 for orders received in February. 

$62 for orders received in March. 

$64 for orders received in April. 

$66 for orders received after any of ihe above dates. 
Prices arc for a sulky fitted with Hartford Bolted tires, twelve ounce canvas 
shipping cover, weight pocket cushion, pump, wrench and oil can. $10 must ac- 
company order. Sulkies to be shipped any time before May 1st. If full cash ac- 
companies order 6 per cent discount. We will build sulky any size and paint any 
color, with name of horse on shaft, without extra charge. Write us for prices on 
bike carts and horse goods. Our forty-eight-page catalog sent on request. 

SEND US YOUR ORDER NOW-YOU CANNOT MAKE A MISTAKE. 

S. E. JERALD SULKY CO., - Waterloo, Iowa, U. S. A. 



Subscribe for the Breedei"; and Sportsman. 



Saturday, February 10, 1912.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



I 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf xnd Sporting Authority of tho Paeiflo Coaat. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday, 
r. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sta., San Francisco. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

National Newspaper Bureau Agent. 219 East 23rd St., New York City 
Entared as Second Class Matter at Sau Francisco Post-Offlce. 

Terms— One Year. $3; Six Months. $1.75; Three Months. $1. 
Foreign postage $1 per year additional ; Canadian postage 50c 
per year additional. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447. San Francisco, Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 

AEROLITE 2:07% 

Sutherland & Chadbourne, Pleasanton 

ALMOND LOU 2:27% Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet 

AIKLIE DEMONIC) 51640 Chas. Johnson, Woodland 

BEST POLICY 42378 R. O. Newman, Visalia 

BON McKINNEY 2:21% los. Twohig, San Jose 

BON VOYAGE 2:08 Ted Haves, Los Angeles 

BON VOLONTE 2:19% Ted Hayes, Los Angeles 

GEO. W. McKINNEY 2:14% . .Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet 
KINNEY' DE LOPEZ (4) 2:23 

Hemet Stock Farm, Hemet 

M, ADRIAN 2:24 E. D. Digges, Pleasanton 

THE BONDSMAN Chas. L. De Ryder, Pleasanton 

THE PATCHEN BOY 2:10>i 

Chas. L. De Ryder, Pleasanton 

TOM SMITH 2:13% P. F. Davev, San Jose 

\YM. HAROLD 2:13% James D. Johnstone, Elmhurst 



THE passage of the registration license law at 
Sacramento has some good features if the provisions 
of that law are enforced and every animal for which 
an application for a license is made is adjudged 
sound and free from hereditary diseases and ail- 
ments as set forth by its requirements. That part of 
it is commendable; no fair-minded man can find fault 
with it, but the question of designating whether a 
h;rse is "pure-bred," "non-standard," or "mongrel," 
is one which should never be introduced, and it 
would not be if the wise legislators who advocated 
this bill had consulted some one who had made a 
study of the registration of standard and registered 
horSesW In the first place, horses are not "pure-bred." 
We have thoroughbreds, but they are the results of 
a mixture of various racing families which traced to 
three — Eclipse, Herod, and Matchem — horses that 
lived over a hundred and fifty years ago. 

Trotting horses are, as everyone knows, a "made 
breed." By judicious mating a number of families 
have been created which have representatives that 
trot fast. They have lost all their speed as running 
horses, if they ever had any. They are not "pure- 
bred," even though they may have descended from 
the Morgans, the Clays, the Mambrinos, the Hamble- 
tonians, or thoroughbreds. But that is not where 
the trouble lies. In denning what horses should be 
licensed there should have been more care given to 
the classification of stallions that are many removes 
from being "mongrels," yet they are now, according 
to this law, designated as such. For instance, they 
should have stated that any stallion which has a 
standard record and is sired by a standard and regis- 
tered horse is eligible as a standard stallion. Accord- 
ing to the rules adopted by the American Trotting 
Association there are two distinct ranks, standard 
trotting and standard pacing, and there is need for 
another rule which would relieve breeders of a great 
deal of anxiety, and the absence of this rule places 
horses like Uhlan 1:58%, Aerolite 2:07%, Moortrix 
2:07%, Charley D. 2:06%, and hundreds of others in 
the class called "mongrels," according to the laws 
of licensing as adopted by the last Legislature. 
For instance, take Aerolite, a pacer; he was by 
Searchlight 33657 (a registered trotting stallion), out 
of Trix (dam of six), by Nutwood Wilkes 22116 (a 
registered trotting stallion); second dam Trixy, by 
Director 1989 (a registered trotting stallion); third 
dam Mischief (dam of cne), by Young Tuckahoe 
2:28%, non-standard. Mischief is registered as non- 
standard, and that places Aerolite outside the rule. 
For it says: 

"Rule 2. A stPllion sire 1 by a registered standard 
Hotting horse, provided his dam and grandam were 
sire 1 by registered standard trotting horses, and he 
himself has a trotting record <>t 2:30 and is the sire 
of three trotters With record:: of 2:30, from different 
mares." 

That is, if he was to be registered as a standard 
trotting horse, but he happens to be a pacer. Tho 
rule in regard to pacing stallions reads: 

"Rule 2. A stallion sired by a registered standard 
pacing horse, provide 1 his dam and grandam were 
sired by registered standard pacing horses, and he 



himself has a pacing record of 2:25, and is the sire 
of three pacers with records of 2:25, from different 
mares." 

Aerolite has a record of 2:07%, but his sire is a 
registered standard trotting horse, and his dam and 
grandam were sired by standard trotting sires. 
Hence, according to these rules, he is ineligible. 

Take Uhlan 1:58%, the fastest trotting gelding in 
the world. He was by Bingen 29567, dam Blonde, by 
Sir Waiter Jr., second dam Brunette, by Black Eagle, 
non-standard. He is also a "mongrel," according to 
our California law, but somehow everybody would 
like to have mongrels of his type. 

There ought to be some changes made in the regis- 
tration laws so that a horse getting a record of 2:10 
or better that sires two or more with records better 
than 2:20, be they trotters or pacers, should be con- 
sidered standard, provided he is by a standard stal- 
lion (trotting or pacing), and out of a mare by a 
standard horse (trotting or pacing). 

Everyone recognizes the fact that the majority of 
our standard bred trotting sires beget pacers and 
many of our fastest pacing stallions sire trotters. 
There should be a law to include such produce, and 
especially if these are record holders. 

The enforcement of this law in California may be 
the means of calling the attention of the. officials of 
the American Registration Association '-co its erro- 
neous rulings, which work a great hardship on breed- 
ers and are detrimental to the very best interests of 
the trotting and pacing horse breeders. 

In the meantime, owners of broodmares should not 
hesitate to breed their mares to such remarkably 
good, game stallions as Charley D. 2:06%, Aerolite 
2:07%, or Moortrix 2:07%. They will become sires 
when many a horse which has the hallmark of regis- 
tration as standard attached to his name is put on 
the shelf, there to remain unheard of and forgotten. 
o 

THE MEETING of secretaries of the fair and 
racing associations of the North Pacific Circuit, 
which was held at Walla Walla, February 1st, was 
one of the best of its kind ever called. Shirley 
Christy represented the interests of the Pacific Coast 
Circuit, and was ably seconded by Mr. H. S. Rol- 
ston, of Vancouver, B. C. The question of dates 
was quickly settled after the delegates from the 
State Fair of Oregon were convinced that it was to 
the best interests of the horse and stock men that 
the dates at Salem should agree with the resolution 
passed at the meeting of the delegates to the Pacific 
Coast Circuit, which are September 2d to 7th in- 
clusive. The consensus of opinion was that the 
formation of this continuous circuit of the leading 
fairs and race meetings was the best ever devised 
for the benefit of all concerned. All owners who 
did not care to follow this big circuit had meetings 
provided for them at this convention, such as at 
Walla Walla, North Yakima, Spokane and Boise. Be- 
sides this, a two nation association was arranged, in- 
cluding Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Montana, 
Utah and Idaho. The purses will aggregate $200,000 
at these northern meetings. 

In about three weeks "another meting of secre- 
taries and delegates of the fair and racing associa- 
tions in California and the directors of the Pacific 
Coast Association, will be called in this city, when 
further details will be given and final preparations 
made toward getting this circuit under way. Shir- 
ley Christy, who is at present in Phoenix, Arizona, 
spent three days at Los Angeles, where he inter- 
viewed the directors of the association there, and, 
from present indications, horsemen can look forward 
to the best season's racing on this coast ever held. 
Everybody realizes the importance of having a contin- 
uous circuit for many reasons and when arrange- 
ments for it are completed there will be no dissent- 
ing opinions. 

o 

STALLION OWNERS have been a little slow about 
advertising their grandly bred horses this year, but 
those who have done so are more than pleased, for 
many inquiries have been coming to them from 
OWnerB Of broodmares. Those owners should, if pos- 
sible, go and see the stallions they have selected on 
their bloodlines and compare them as Individuals 
with their mares, and also take the pedigrees and 
see how they combine. That is the way the most 
successful breeders of thoroughbreds achieved fame 
and fortune. They did not breed all their mares to 
one stallion because they owned him. Some mares 
"cross" better and more successfully with stallions 
which represent a different line from the sire they 
own. In the Eastern States it is no uncommon thing 
to see our latest up-to-date students of troting horse 



breeding send a mare or two many hundreds of miles 
to be bred to some horse they had seen whose blood- 
lines they believed would cross well with the mares 
they wanted to get futurity stake winners from. If 
Senator Stanford had pursued this policy and ex- 
changed stud services with Win. Corbitt, G. Valensin, 
Monroe Salisbury, I. Ayers, L. .1. Rose, H. Pierce, or 
any of the other leading breeders, there might have 
been a vast increase in the number of gr.od ones that 
would claim Palo Alto for a birthplace. Many a 
service was wasted on mares at that big farm be- 
cause no one seemed to realize that other stock farm 
owners had stallions that would be perfect mates for 
these Palo Alto mares. Our present-day broodmare 
owners are all "small breeders" and they cannot 
afford to follow such unsatisfactory and unprofitable 
methods. They must study, investigate, decide, and 
use their best judgment in this work, as it means 
considerable to them, for in a great measure their 
decisions on this breeding problem will affect the 
produce of all horses and mares which trace to their 
mares for generations. 

OUR NEW ZEALAND LETTER. 

Christchurch, N. Z., Jan. 11, 1912. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman: 

Amongst the competitors at the Canterbury Park 
(N. Z.) recent meeting was the American bred mare 
Bonny Jenny, by Bonnie Direct, owned by Mr. Alfred 
Lawrence. She was not half fit, having only been in 
work a few weeks, and, under the circumstances, her 
two displays were decidedly creditable. On the first 
day she showed a lot of pace in the Templeton Han- 
dicap, but spoiled her chance by a bad break. On 
the second day she went much better, finishing a 
good second to Mallet in the Progressive Handicap, 
after getting over the two miles in 5:10. 

Glendalough, a full sister to Dan Patch 2:11 (N. Z.), 
was a competitor in the Champion Handicap at the 
Canterbury Park meeting on January 2d, but after 
misbehaving herself at the post was ordered back to 
the paddock by the starter on account of her erratic, 
behavior. The Rothschild filly has a rare turn of 
speed, but has been spoiled by incompetent handling. 

Betel Nut, who wen the Plumpton Handicap at the 
Canterbury Park meeting (N. Z.) on January 1st, is 
a half brother to the champion King Cole 2:08 3-5. 
He is the best of Peralta's stock that have raced so 
far, and, like King Cole, is trained by Newton Price. 
Peralta was by McKinney 2:ll I / 4. 

During the Christmas and New Year holidays a 
large number of trotting meetings were held in New 
Zealand, and all were well attended with splendid 
results. Twelve months ago followers of light har- 
ness racing had both the totalisator and bookmakers 
at their service as mediums of speculation, but since 
then the calling of a bookmaker has been made 
illegal by legislation. As a result the totalisator 
receipts at all recent meetings have shown from 50 
to 100 per cent increase and the clubs have benefited 
accordingly. 

The Auckland Trotting Club, the second largest in 
New Zealand, had a most successful three days' 
meeting at New Year's time. No less than $164,470 
was speculated on the totalisator, and, as the fields 
were fairly large, the northern club will come out of 
its liabilities with a handsome surplus. 

The stallion Y.oung McKinney, by Seymour Wilkes 
2:08%, who was sent from America to New Zealand 
with a "faked" pedigree, had a couple of winners at 
the Auckland Trotting Club's summer meeting in 
Alf. McKinney and Master Park. Both can muster 
up a lot of pace and are sure to do much better in 
the near future. 

Notwithstanding the prosperous times they have 
been having lately, the principal Canterbury Trot- 
ting Clubs have not given a commensurate increase 
in stake money. This has caused a lot of ill feeling 
in the ranks of owners', who, at a recent meeting, 
decided to boycott the next race meeting of the 
New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club, unless bet- 
ter prize money be offered. It is quite likely that a 
compromise will be effected. 

A strong agitation is being raised by many New 
Zealand owners of light harness horses in favor of 
free-for-all racing. They contend that there are so 
many horses capable of going a mile between 2:15 
and 2:20 that every big club should provide at least 
one free-for-all for this class cf horses on its future 
programs. 

No more popular athlete has ever visited New 
Zealand than Maurice McLaughlin the young San 
Francisco tennis player, who. with Monies W right and 
VV. Larnod, made a futile attempt to wrest the Davis 
Cup from the Austrnlnsinns. His quiet demeanor 
both on and off the field of play earned him the 
respect of all, while the brilliant exposition of tennis 
given by him In both singles and doubles evoked the 
enthusiasm of the crowd. II America is ever to lift 
the coveted cup, it is to men of McLaughlin's stamp 
rather than to veteran p'ayers such as Wright and 
Lamed, that she will have to look to. Norman 
Brooks is the admitted tennis champion of the world, 
but whereas he defeated Henlcs Wright comfortably, 
it taxed his resources to the utmost to account for 
McLaughlin on the third day cf the competition. 

Sincerely yours, 

FRED THOMAS. 

M. C. Keefer's well-bred stallion The Proof 2:29% 
will be bred to twenty mares this season, and his 
book is almost full. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 10, 1912. 



PLEASANTON'S BIG ATTRACTIONS. 



The Greatest Collection of Famous Horses Ever 
Stabled at This Historic Track. 

It is as natural for horsemen visiting California 
to desire to go to Pleasanton as it is for tourists to 
Philadelphia to want to see the old State House, the 
Liberty Bell, and the room wherein the Declaration 
of Independence was signed. Horsemen have heard 
of Pleasanton since 1882, and almost every year 
some horse has gone away from that track and 
achieved the very highest honors, either as a money- 
winner or a record-breaker. Its fame extends to 
the limits of civilization and its name is United with 
that of the histories of some of our greatest turf and 
track performers. About twenty years ago Palo Alto, 
San Mateo, and G. Valensin's stcck farms were the 
stellar attractions; but one by one they passed out 
of existence when their owners died. Even in those 
days the Pleasanton Stock Farm, owned by Mcnroe 
Salisbury, was the birthplace of many good ones, and 
this track was the pathway over which they took 
their lessons under the watchful eye of the "King- 
maker." Not only did this good man make trotters, 
but he also schooled trainers and taught horseshoers 
their business. We shall never see his equal in this 
respect. Some men can take two or three horses 
and get them ready for racing, Mcnroe Salisbury 
could handle fifteen just as easily and no two of them 
be trained alike. Many of the old stalls out of which 
he used to say he could "lead more speed than any 
man in America could out of a stone barn" have been 
torn down, but there is quite a number left that 
once were occupied by some of the most famous 
trotters and pacers whose names grace the pages of 
trotting horse history as sires and dams of standard 
performers. Some of these stalls are filled at present 
by horses which are being prepared for the race 
meetings on the Canadian, Grand, and Pacific Coast 
Circuits. They belong to that prince among million- 
aires, R. J. MacKenzie, of Winnipeg, and are in 
charge of the noted trainer and reinsman, Havis 
James. 

The first one looked at is a dark bay stallion, not a 
very large, but a strongly made son of The Exponent 
2:11%, by Bingen 2:06%, he is called The Earnest, 
and as a two-year-old last year got a record of 2:21%. 
He is very well bred, his dam being Mardella, by Del 
Mar 13313, grandam Label, by Gen. Washington 1161, 
great grandam Lady Banker 2:23, by Hambletonian 
10. Mr. MacKenzie purchased him shortly after he 
made his record, and as this colt is heavily engaged 
in a number of futurities and stakes, it is not claim- 
ing too much to say that whoever defeats him will 
have to keep "mighty busy from wire to wire." 

March McEwen 2:08% is a peculiarly marked chest- 
nut pacing gelding with dashes of white splashed 
over his coat, legs and face, which give him the 
appearance of a "calico horse." He started in thir- 
teen races in 1909 and won nine of them. Last year 
he was "laid on the shelf" by sickness, as were the 
balance of Mr. MacKenzie"s horses, with a few ex- 
ceptions. This year, however, he looks good and will 
be readv when the races are called. He is by Fred 
S. McEwen (son of Fred S. Wilkes 15278), out of 
Cleo, by Rattler Brooks. 

In the next stall is the coal black stallion Zom- 
black 2:26V 2 (trial 2:08%), by Zombro 2:11, cut of 
Madeleine Marshall (also dam of Zoblack 2:24%), by 
Demonio 2:11%; second dam Mamie Comet 2:23%, 
a great broodmare by Nutwood 2:18%, the "king of 
broodmare sires." Zomblack has received careful 
training and is one of the best mannered hcrses in 
the string, and, eligible as he is to 50 many classes, 
should win a goodly share of the purses this year. 

Vernon McKinney 2:02, with this kind of a record 
to his credit: 2:03, 2:02, 2:02%, was the "mainstay 
of the string" in 1911, but meeting with a slight acci- 
dent while jogging preparatory to a race, Mr. .lames 
deemed it advisable to at once throw him cut of train- 
ing and save him for 1912. He is getting "right as 
rain," as the Englishmen say, and shows no sign of 
lameness. When the bell taps he will be ready, and 
from what he has shown will come nearer reach- 
ing the championship record than any horse bred in 
California. He is the first "green" pacer bred here 
to start to the races without a mark and ccme home 
with a record as low as the one he earned in a hard- 
lought race. 

In the next stall is Joe Patchen II, a "gentleman" 
of the first school if there ever was one. He was 
sired by Joe Patchen 2:01%, out of Bessie BonehiU 
2:05%, by Empire Wilkes 3198; second dam Arab 
Girl (dam of Sukharte 2:28% and the sire Crittenden 
433); third dam Saieda Bashaw, by Bashaw Jr. 2:24%, 
by Green's Bashaw. He has a record of 2:17%, but. 
if he had not been the unfortunate victim of a rail- 
road accident on his way East last May, he would be 
well up among the 2:02 performers. Either in repose 
or action he is one of the grandest and most impres- 
sive types of a stallion one can become enthusiastic 
over. He was bred to several mares last season, but 
this season will not be allowed to serve any. 
He won seven consecutive races on the ice in Canada, 
and wears nothing but bis shoes. No boots, nor toe 
weights, and in action he is the true exemplar of 
' poetry in motion." 

Judge Blaine, by Trampfast 2:12%, dam Emma 
Conductor 2:21%, by Conductor 12256; second dam 
Racket, by Egbert; third dam Silence, by Abdallah 
15; fourth dam Woodbine, by Woodford. He is well 
enough bred to suit any judge of pedigree and as an 
individual is a credit to his ancestry. 

Merry Widow 2:03% is a sweet little mare. She 
won seven out of eight starts in 1910 and in 1909 she 
started in thirteen races and was declared the win- 
ner in all of them. She is by Red Pac 2:16% (son of 
Pactolus 9102 and Kitty Clover, by Redwald 178, 



etc.), and her dam was Bonnie, by Sam Wilkes Jr., 
a horse little known as a sire, but undoubtedly well 
bred. Merry Widow was taken sick in the East 
shortly after her arrival there last summer, and for 
a time it was thought her case was hopeless, but Mr. 
James being one of the most competent horsemen in 
the business, never despaired; finally she recovered, 
but too late to start in any of the races she was 
named in. She is doing nicely, and if not afflicted 
with any more ailments will prove that this long rest- 
ing spell will make her faster than ever. 

Another mare here that does not suffer by com- 
parison with the balance in these stalls is the bay 
mare Dariel that Chas. De Ryder purchased from 
W. A. Perley, of Chico, about two months ago. She 
is a racy-looking, determined-going mare and very 
pure gaited. In Mr. James' hands she will overcome 
all peculiarities she may have and when the results 
of the races in which she takes part are announced 
her name, like Abou Ben Adam's, "will lead all the 
rest." She was sired by Arthur Wilkes 2:28, out of 
a mare by Whips 2:27%; second dam by Antevolo 
2:19%; third dam by Winthrop, etc. She is bred to 
"go the route" and trot until sundown. 

There is a two-year-old chestnut filly by Hedgewood 
Boy 2:01, in the next stall, which must be close to 
sixteen hands high, very symmetrically made, and 
a pure trotter. She is so growthy nothing has been 
done with her, and as she is one of the latest ac- 
quisitions to the stable, I believe it will pay to wait 
a little for her. 

Bert Kelly, this is the horse the boys at Stockton 
used to siug about, and the air of that well known 
tune, "Has anyone here seen Kelly?" still echoes at 
the race track. Bert was another "prospect" that 
came near "pinching out" in the East, last summer. 
No one thought he would live, but good care and the 
best of veterinary skill pulled him through, and, ere 
the snow falls, Bert will be in the z:10 list. He is 
well thought of as a trotter and his gameness is un- 
questioned. He was sired by E. D. Digges' well-made 
stallion McAdrian 2:24, and his dam was by Mountain 
Boy 4841; grandam by Joe Daniels, one of our famous 
four-mile winning thoroughbreds. 

Peter Preston 2:06%, by Peter the Great, is an- 
other added feature to this stable of attractions, he 
got his record last year and will as surely lower it 
this year as any horse here. These Peter the Greats 
are noted for doing better ever time they start, and 
this fellow is bred to do so. His dam was Tosa 
2:19% (dam of 5), by Enfield 2:29; second dam Susie 
G. (dam of 2), by Scipio; third dam Mary M. (dam 
cf 41, by Bassinger; fifth dam Molly, thoroughbred, 
by Hamlet, son of Consul, etc. 

One Better (2) 2:24%, by Nearest McKinney 
2:13%, out of Much Better 2:07'/*, by Chas. Derby 
2:20, has developed into a good-looking horse, and as 
a pacer in the 2:25, or faster classes, he will be a 
valuable member of this string. He. only started 
once last season, but did not lower his record. 

St. Thomas 2:19% is a bay trotting gelding by 
Wood Wilkes that much is expected of this year. 
In 1910 he won five races. 

The Canadian pacer Starbrino 2:10% was next led 
out. He is a large, strong-made gelding, and has 
quite a record as a consistent race horse. He started 
in twelve races and won them all, four of these being 
won in six days! His sire is Wildbrino 2:19% (son 
of Hambrino 820), dam Mad River Belle 2:17%, by 
King of Belair 7530; grandam Losonite, by Cur- 
rency 3709. 

In an adjoining stall is a green five-year-old pacing 
gelding by Directly 2:03% that was bought in one 
East last fall. He is reputed to have shown fast 
trials and before he is taken East Mr. James will 
learn all about his speed and whether the tales told 
about him are true. 

There's another newcomer to this string called 
Bill Scott, by Red Medium, out of - a mare by Al- 
cyoneer. He is a trotter. 

J. C. Simpson 2:17%, by San Mateo, is a four-year- 
old that won nine races and is a credit to the man 
he was named after. 

Alvivilola, by Libretto, is a very promising trotter, 
he is also a recent purchase. 

Harry Direct is the name of an unmarked pacer by 
Direct 2:05%. 

Panboy 2:12%, standing in the stall adjoining 
ing these, is cne of the ideal pacers we read so much 
about but seldom see. He has the sweetest disposi- 
tion imaginable in or out of harness. Never pulls 
nor lugs cn the bit; always ready, a cheerful driver, 
wears no boots, and his record is nowhere near what 
he is capable of making. Panboy has been driven 
over this track by Mrs. MacKenzie a mile in 2:15%, 
last quarter in 30 seconds, and it seemed no effort 
for her. This pacer was sired by Pangold (a son of 
the great sire Pancoast), out of a mare by Hennepin 
Bey, son of Strathmore. 

Last, but by no means least, to be inspected was 
the latest addition to this stable of "attractions." 
El Zombro, a fine-looking son of Zombro 2:11, cut 
of Bloom, by Nushagak. In harness, this coal black 
son of the greatest of McKinney's sons is a show 
animal, and as a trotter he is destined to be cne of 
the brightest stars in this constellation of brilliant 
ones. He is a pure-gaited trotter, and everybody 
who knows Mr. Alex Brown, of Walnut Grove, who 
bred this fellow, will take a greater interest in the 
welfare of this collection of horses than ever, be- 
cause this good-looking, well-bred colt is included 
in it. That he will "make good" everybody who has 
seen him, is confident. 

Greenebaum 2:22%, by Red Medium, is also in 
this string; he belongs to D. J. McDonald, of Winni- 
peg, who also owns the handsome trotter Kalatan, by 
Kinney Lou 2:07%, out of Cricket 2:10, the first 
pacer to get in the 2:10 list, and, since being retired 



to the breeding ranks, has proven to be one of the 
greatest of broodmares. 

Harry Direct, Starbrino 2:10%, and Peter Preston 
2:08% belong to Mr. A. C. MacKenzie, of Winnipeg. 

Messrs. Havis James and Geo. H. Spencer are get- 
ting their horses ready and taking their time to 
harden them up, and in a month from now will begin 
moving them along. Two more industrious or careful 
men cannot be found cn any track; they have de- 
voted the better part of their lives to the training 
and development of trotters and have as assistants 
men they can rely upon to do their work properly. 
This combination is a strong one, and with the ma- 
terial they have to work with, it is the earnest hope 
of every one who has visited Pleasanton and talked 
with them that they will never have a repetition 
of the series of misfortunes which befell them during 
the racing season of 1911. Mr. R. J. MacKenzie, the 
owner, is not one to give up in the face of trouble, 
and his pluck and determination to stick to the 
game, notwithstanding his pecuniary losses as well 
as great disappointments of last season, have made 
countless friends and admirers for him wherever trot- 
ters are known. He is better equipped now to grap- 
ple with every racing proposition than ever, and the 
best wishes of all interested in trotters on this 
Coast will accompany these horses and their trainers 
whenever they start. 

o 

BONADAY STOCK FARM. 

Mr. Shirley Christy, secretary of the Arizona Ter- 
ritorial Fair visited the Bonaday Stock Farm, Frank 
E. Alley, proprietor, at Roseburg, Oregon, last week, 
and speaks most enthusiastically of the place, its 
improvements and trotting stock. The premier stal- 
lion there is Bonaday (2) 2:27%, one of the finest 
looking and best bred sons of Bon Voyage 2:08, his 
dam being Welladay (sister to Klatawah 2:05%, 
Chas. Derby 2:20, etc.), by Steinway. The colts and 
fillies by this horse are remarkable for their uni- 
formity of conformation, color, and action. 

Count Boni is a full brother, a year younger, no 
record, and is a remarkably handsome stallion. 

Sonoma Boy (2) 2:20 is a full brother to that great 
stake winner Sonoma Girl 2:04% and his progeny 
show that they inherit his splendid disposition, beau- 
tiful conformation and phenomenal speed. 

Sitka Boy is a coal black four-year-old stallion by 
Greco B. (son of McKinney 2:11 1 ,4 and Alein, by 
Anteeo 2:16%, etc.), out of Oniska (dam of San 
Frnncisco 2:07%), by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%; sec- 
ond dam Bay Line, by Direct Line; third dam Puss, 
by California Nutwood. Sitka Boy was worked a lit- 
tle last year before going to the mile track to get 
ready for the races. He stepped the half-mile track 
in 2:29, last half in 1:11, last quarter in 34 seconds. 
He is doing so well now that Mr. Alley has reason 
to believe he will get a low record this year. 

Rcseburg Boy (3) 2:21 is a brown gelding by Dia- 
wood, out of Lady Lemo, by Memo, that was just 
beaten a scant head by Ruby Light in 2:15, at Salem, 
with the track several seconds slow, last year. 

The next one looked at is as good a "prospect" as 
there is on this Coast. He is called Michael Angelo, 
his sire is Sonoma Boy (2) 2:20, and his dam Is 
Angelina Boswell, by Hart Boswell. He is fast, good- 
headed, game, and gaited like Sonoma Boy. 

This farm's representative in all the Coast Futuri- 
ties of 1912 is Boniske 57034, by Bonaday, out of 
Oniska, a slashing good-looking black two-year-old 
trotter and one that will prove he is worthy of his 
breeding. 

Phyllis Wynne 2:15, by Bon Voyage 2:08, is out of 
Mabel Wynn 2:21%, by Zombro 2:11, that was con- 
ceded to be the handsomest mare in Oregon. Phyllis 
Wynne will be among the 2:10 trotters this season. 

Belle N. Norton, by Bonnie Direct 2:05%, out of 
Petrina, by Piedmont 2:17%, had a bad leg last year 
early in the spring, but it was fired and she is now 
apparently sound. Has shown a mile over the Salem 
track in 2:11, last quarter in 30% seconds. 

Diavola L., by Diab'o 2: 09 ',4, cut of the great brood- 
mare Lily Langtry, by Nephew, is a "green" pacer, 
but will be about "ripe" when the bell rings. 

Many people have been very much interested in the 
photographs of the youngsters which were taken at 
the State Fair. Salem, last year, others have seen the 
little ones on the farm, and to gratify their wish as 
to how they were bred, Mr. Alley kindly sent the 
following list of foals of 1911: 

Douglas ()., hav colt, fonled April 6; by Bonaday; dam 
Bettie G. by Greco I?. - Has trotted one-eighth In 

25 seconds. 

Bonnlola. bay filly, foiled April 16; by Bonaday; dam 
Addioln Mark by McKinney. Has trotted an eighth 
in 25 Vt seconds, one-sixteenth in 11 seconds. 

Allie Black, black filly, foaled May 1; by Bonaday: 
dam Anita by Captain McKinney. Has trotted 
an eighth in 26% seconds. 

I:,,,, iiinbio. sorrel eolt, foaled May n: by Bonaday; 

dam Diavola L. by Diablo. Has trotted a quarter 
in 4fi seconds. 
Patricia Oregonia, bay filly, trotter, foaled February 
10; by Bonaday; dam Angeline Boswell by Hart 

Boswell. 

Valeen M.. sorrel filly, picer, foaled April 4; by Bona- 

dav; dam Diabella < '. by Diablo. 
Miss Bonaday. bay filly, trotter, foaled May 2; by 

Bonaday: dam Minnie H. by Mulligan. 
Bon Cupide. bay colt, trotter, foaled May 4; by Bona- 
day: dam Diona A. by Cupid. 
McKinney Bird, hay roan colt, trotter, foaled May 10; 

h\ sitka Hnv; dnm Saconne Hal by Pilot Hal. 
Princess Bonaday. black filly, trotter, foaled May 19; 

by Bonaday: dam Oniska by Nutwood Wilkes. 
Miss Welladay. brown filly, trotter, foaled June 5; by 

Kvergets; dam Welladay by Steinway. 
Bonnie June, back fill v. trotter, foaled June 19: by 

Bonaday: dam Fortuna G. W. by Guy Wilkes. 
Bon Grenear. brown colt, trotter, foaled July 6; by 

Bonaday; dam Maud Grenear by Greco B 
Bon Bourect, bay colt, foaled April 7: by Bonaday: 

dam Maud Stamhourect by Stamboul. Has trotted 

an eighth in 27 seconds. 



Saturday, February 10, 1912.] 



WILL BREED TROTTERS. 

Lexington and central Kentucky now gives promise 
of becoming as widely and favorably known as the 
breeding place for trotters as it enjoyed as the center 
of the thoroughbred breeding world several years ago. 
So great was the interest shown in the stock farms 
by visitors to the fall races here last year and so 
closely were all the details of an up-to-date breeding 
establishment inspected, and numerous questions 
asked the owners as to the conducting of such an 
establishment by wealthy Easterners, that it was 
then predicted that before another year closed there 
would be many new recruits in the field, and Lex- 
ington and vicinity would be the central point of 
their operations. 

The first of these recruits arrived upon the scene 
in the person of the New York turfman, David M. 
Looke, who purchased the famous Castleton farm of 
James R. Keene, and announced that he would change 
the place into a nursery for trotting horses. Then 
W. H. Dickerman purchased a small farm, and now 
General C. C. Watts, cf Charleston, W. Va., is on the 
lookout for a place to remove his mares, some seven- 
ty-five in number, and to establish a breeding plant, 
with his grand young stallion, General Watts, three- 
year-old record 2:06%, at its head. Senator Joseph 
W. Bailey has again signified his intention of enter- 
ing the game, and has already begun to get together 
a band of choice young broodmares. 

This sudden exodus to Kentucky is credited to the 
purchase of the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association by a New York syndicate, and the num- 
ber of changes made in the conduct of the affairs of 
the association, especially in the changing of the 
three-year-old Kentucky Futurity from a three-in-fiv'e- 
heat event to a two-in-three. This race is the richest 
event of the American trotting turf to-day, and it is 
the desire of all horsemen to own a winner of this 
prize, not only for its financial value, but because 
the winner is declared the champion three-year-old 
of the year. 

Usually the race is a hard-fought one and requires 
from four to six heats to decide. When three-year- 
olds trotted around 2:20 this was considered no hard- 
ship, but when a horse of that age is required to go 
a mile better than 2:08 in order to win, owners and 
veterinarians say it is too much to ask of the young- 
ster to go four or five miles at this rate of speed, and 
that after a hard-fought battle of this kind a horse 
was returned useless for racing ever after. The 
American Trotting Association took this view, and 
requested the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association to change the old-time three-in-five heats 
to the more modern three-heat event. This they re- 
fused to do, and many of the wealthy breeders, in- 
cluding Senator bailey, refused to nominate their 
mares until such a change should be made. 

When the Eastern syndicate bought the track it 
was understood that the change would be made at 
the first official meeting, and millionaires who had 
long had their eyes upon the rich classic began to 
look around for promising and richly-bred young 
broodmares in the hope of securing the dam of a 
future Futurity winner, and as the majority of the 
Futurity winners are bred in Kentucky they naturally 
look toward that State as the proper place to estab- 
lish their farms. 

Besides the four establishments mentioned above, 
there are now upward of fifty trotting horse farms 
in this vicinity, among the most noted being John E. 
Madden's Hamburg place, the home of the Futurity 
winner Siliko, the Native, and others; W. E. D. 
Stokes' Patchen Wilkes Farm, the home of Peter 
the Great, which horse has sired more Futurity win- 
ners than any other sire in the world; L. V. Hark- 
ness' Walnut Hall Farm, the home of Moko, known 
as the sire of Futurity winners, and Walnut Hall, 
sire of The Harvester, and himself a Futurity win- 
ner; Warren A. Bacon's Maplehurst Farm, the home 
of Locanda 2:02; R. C. Estill's Elmhurst Farm, the 
home of the Futurity winner Kentucky Todd, and 
sire of the Kentucky Futurity winner of last season, 
Princess Todd, and Atlantic Express, which good 
winner of last season will be in the stud; W. W. 
Estill's Elmwood Farm, and numerous other smaller 
places each with two or more stallions and from ten 
to fifty mares. 

o 

THE HORSEMAN $20,000 FUTURITY. 



The richest of all newspaper Futurities on a most 
liberal system of entrance is advertised in this issue 
and appeals to every owner of a broodmare. It is for 
foals of 1912 and is guaranteed to be worth not less 
than $20,000. Entries will close Friday, March 15, 
1912, when the first payment of two dollars will be 
due on each mare nominated. Then on November 
1st a payment of $5 is to be made, and an additional 
$5 will be required May 1, 191.'!, and no further pay- 
ments until year of race. Entry blanks for this great 
event may be obtained at this office. There is a 
four-year-old trotting division, which is a new feature 
and one that should be appreciated. No one who 
owns a good mare can afford to let this opportunity 
pass, for an entry in this stake enhances the value 
of every colt or filly, and brings the youngster into 
greater prominence as well as placing it in a position 
to win a large sum of money on a small investment. 

Regarding transportation facilities on the Pacific- 
Coast Circuit, would it not be a good idea to adopt 
the plan in vogue last year on the Michigan Short 
Circuit? The managers of this chartered a train of 
cars and had it for thirteen weeks. Every horse had 
his stall in it and the expenses were reduced to a 
low figure. It was better for the railroads and also 
for the horsemen. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



A LITTLE HUMBOLDT BAND. 



Dr. Rae Felt, of Eureka, Humboldt county, has over 
thirty head of trotters and pacers headed by his stal- 
lion by Star Pointer 1:59%, out of Edith 2:10, by 
Dexter Prince. He also has the only grand daughter 
of the thoroughbred Imported Sain on the Pacific 
Coast. She was sired by Bonnie Direct 2:05%, out of 
this Sain mare; second dam Morgiana by Gen. Ben- 
ton. Dr. Felt says there is no road too long for her 
and a more cheerful driving mare a man never sat 
behind. There is another mare here. Telltale, that 
created quite a sensation on the circuit in 1910. She 
is a peculiarly spotted red roan with white markings 
which she undoubtedly inherits from a mare that Dr. 
Felt's father purchased from some emigrants who 
had her hitched in a team in front of a "prairie 
schooner" in the early fifties. She was called Old 
Jude and was like the famous Opelousas horses that 
came from Louisiana and were undoubtedly descend- 
ants of the Arabians and Andalusians that history 
tells us were brought there by Cortez. Old Jude was 
a noted roadster, an untiring saddle mare, and had 
more nerve force and greater recuperative powers 
than any horse or mare in her immediate neighbor- 
hood. Dr. T. D. Felt bred her to many of the old- 
time sires, she proved a most prolific breeder. Some- 
times her produce would resemble her in color, mark- 
ings and shadings, but all had peculiar fine manes 
and tails, and clean flat limbs; their heads were 
typically Arabian, large eyes, broad foreheads, small 
active ears (always on the alert), wide jowls and 
small muzzle. She was the progenitress of many 
famous roadsters and the last of these is Telltale, that 
was timed a mile in 2:12%. She was by Edward B., 
he by Stam B. 2:11% out of Celia Mc. by Dexter 
Prince; second dam Belle, by Elect, a son of Elec- 
tioneer; third dam by Mambrino Eclipse; fourth dam 
Roxie by St. Lawrence Morgan, and fifth dam by Im- 
ported Glencoe. Telltale's dam was out of a mare 
by Jack W. 2:12 (son of Waldstein 2:22%, and a mare 
by Rifleman, son of Imported Glencoe) ; second dam 
Rapid Ann 2:27% (the Year Book says 2:30) by 
Overland, and the next dam was a daughter of Old 
Jude's. This mare Rapid Ann was another noted ani- 
mal and many stories could be told of her achieve- 
ments. Dr. Fe'.t also has a nice mare called Little 
Pearlo, by Greco B., out of Pearl K. (trial 2:15), by 
Wayland W. 2:12%; second dam Pensee by The 
Grand Moor; third dam Lodi (thoroughbred). This 
mare and Telltale he is to send to Chas. De Ryder, 
Pleasanton, next month. He also has a very prom- 
ising Searchlight filly out of Edith 2:10, which he 
calls Edithlight; she is a Simon-pure pacer and a good 
one. Another is a filly by the McKinney stallion 
Cruzados, out of Ril Ray, by Ira; second dam Rapid 
Ann, by Overland, the horse L. J. Rose brought from 
Wisconsin with Minnehaha. There are many fine 
colts and fillies in the little band of horses Dr. Felt 
owns, all of them are good looking, and bred from 
families that are noted for the excellence of their 
limbs, strong constitutions and stamina. 

o 

STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY MEETING. 



In order to follow the schedule of the Pacific Coast 
Fair and Racing Association's schedule, the California 
State Fair will open three weeks later this year than 
it did in 1911, beginning on September 14th and clos- 
ing September 21st. This was decided by the Board 
of Directors of the State Agricultural Society at a 
meeting in Sacramento Thursday. The stock breed- 
ers and horsemen who make the Pacific Coast Fair 
circuit will not reach the State's capital until Sep- 
tember 12th or 13th. 

Thursday's meeting was ealled to hear the report 
of the committee appointed to revise the premium 
lists. A number of important changes in premiums 
was recommended and adopted. In addition, the 
directors adopted resolutions urging the management 
of the Panama-Pacific Exposition to plan for a 
record-breaking livestock show during the World's 
Fair in 1915. In part the resolutions were as follows: 

"Resolved, That it is the sense of the Board of 
Directors of the State Agricultural Society of Cali- 
fornia that the general plan for a livestock display 
at said exposition should be projected on a scale so 
magnificent and generous as to interest breeders 
everywhere and bring together a showing of the best 
animals in all classes from all parts of the earth, 

"Resolved, That to this end, in view of the close 
relation of the industry to the best interests of man- 
kind, the prizes given by the exposition management 
should be on a liberal scale and we urge on the State 
commission of California, which is authorized to su- 
pervise the expenditure of the $5,000,000 appropri- 
ated by this State for exhibition purposes to set 
aside a suitable sum for the purpose, and let it be 
known at the earliest possible date that they will 
duplicate all awards made to California exhibitors in 
the livestock department at the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Deposition in 1915. We emphasize early ac- 
tion in order that breeders may be prompted to im- 
prove their parent stock in time to raise up the 
highest possible type of animals for the great event 

"Resolved, That in our opinion this plan energet- 
ically carried out would give greater stimulus to the 
breeding of better livestock than any measure ever 
heretofore undertaken, while the cost would be nomi- 
nal compared to the benefits that would accrue to 
the human race, to say nothing of the epoch it would 
mark in the advancement of one of the greatest inter- 
ests of the earth." 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



AEROLITE 2:07'/ 2 . 

There were few better bred stallions than Search- 
light 2:03% ever brought to California. He was 
strongly trotting bred, nevertheless he paced and 
paced smoothly end with less friction than any horse 
of his day. He was by Dark Night (son of Alcyone 
2:27) out of Nora Mapes (dam of Lucie 2:18%, etc.) 
by Furor; grandam Hattie Mapes 2:33% (dam of 
Judge Woolsey 2:21%) by Abdallah Star." The late 
Thos. Keating drove Searchlight in all his races and 
believed he should have a mark of tv.-o minutes, for 
he had often paced halves better than a minute. 
Searchlight was bred to a number of mares, and 
it has only been observed lately that nearly every 
colt and filly he sired, if from any kind of a fairly 
well bred mare, had speed. In 1911 he had seven 
enter the 2:30 list and of these Alberta 2:09%, the 
little 800 pound pacer proved to be one of the best 
campaigners of the year. C. The Limit by him low- 
ered his record to 2:04% and Aerolite reduced his 
record to 2:07%. This horse Aerolite is perfect in 
every way so far as individuality, disposition, sound- 
ness, size and color goes, but he is bred to make 
a sire and by the performances of the stake winners 
Ruby Light (3) 2:11%, Aerolite (2) 2:21 and Leonid 
in 1911, he has proven he is one. His dam Trix is 
one of the greatest broodmares living. She is also 
the dam of Mona Wilkes 2:03%, Moortrix 2:07%, a 
horse that started nine times in 1909 and won eight 
races. This Mona Wilkes was the fastest daugh- 
ter of Demonio's and Moortrix was the fastest to the 
credit of Azmoor 2:20%. Besides these she had 
three others in 2:30. Trix was by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16%, out of Trixy by Director 2:17; second dam 
Mischief (dam of Brilliant, sire of Brilliantlne 
2:17%) by young Tuckahoe, etc. Aerolite will be 
raced this year after making a short season in the 
stud. He is owned by C. L. Gifford, of Idaho, who 
will have him campaigned. Until then Aerolite will 
be kept at Woodland in charge of Messrs. Sutherland 
& Chadbourne. 

NORTH PACIFIC CIRCUIT FAIR DATES AN- 
NOUNCED. 

Walla Walla (Wash.), February 1. — Secretaries of 
fair associations of the North Pacific circuit, in an- 
nual session here today, set dates for 1912 fairs as 
fo'lows: 

Vancouver, B. C, August 1st to 17th; Seattle, Au- 
gust 19th to 24th; Portland, August 26th to 31st; 
Salem, September 2d to 7th; Vancouver, Wash., Se|> 
tember 9th to 14th; Walla Walla, September 16th to 
21st; North Yakima, September 23d to 28th; Spokane, 
September 30th to October 5th; Boise, October 7th 
to 12th. A two-nation association was arranged, 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Montana, Utah and 
Idaho being included. The purses will aggregate 
$200,000 and the programme provides for racing 
events for fifteen weeks. The board of stewards is 
to be composed of three members of the Canadian 
circuit, one from Manitoba and one from Idaho. 

An international circuit association, an organiza- 
tion composed of the five fair and racing circuits in 
the west, was formed by the men attending the 
meeting of the North Pacific Fair Association, after 
adjournment of that body. The new organization has 
as officers the newly elected officers of the North 
Pacific organization, of which Walla Walla is a mem- 
ber, and a board of control composed of officers of all 
the circuits included, which are the North Pacific 
Fair Association, Pacific Coast Association, British 
Columbia Circuit, Western Canadian circuit and In- 
ternational circuit. 

New officers are H. S. Rolston, Vancouver, B. C, 
president; Robert Cosgrove, Spokane, vice-president; 
J. W. Pace, North Yakima and Seattle, secretary. 
Salem, Ore., gets the next meeting. 

STANDARD BRED STALLIONS LICENSED. 

Following is a list of stallions that were licensed 
by the California Stallion Registration Board from 
January 11th to 31st inclusive: 
Athadon — George L. Warlow Fresno. 
Black Hall — George L. Warlow Fresno. 
Stanford McKinney — George L. Warlow, Fresno. 
Nogi — George I,. Warlow. Fresno. 
Strathboule — George I,. Warlow, Fresno. 
Doctor W. — Geo. & Jos. Avlla. Gustlne, Cal. 
Garret B. — Klmer Treanor, Santa Maria. 
Logan Pointer — .1. 10. Montgomery, Davis. 
.71m Logan — J. E. Montgomery, Davis. 
Alton — Louis MatlVla, Dixon. 
No lac B. — H. S. Brown, Kan Luis Obispo. 
Alrlie Demonio — Chas. Johnson. Woodland. 
Kl Dinero — J. D. Shuler, Woodland, 

Owynez — H. Scott. San .Jose. 
Athasham — D. L. Bachant, Fresno. 
Salvador- — Chas. Scott, St. Helena. 
Invermay — -Chas. Scott, St. Helena. 
Search Pointer — J. Kitchen Jr., Oakland. 
Red Nuttle — M. MeTntlre, Kelseyvllle. 
Hubert Direct — Maccdn * Costa. Hanforrl. 
.11 in Wood - O. A. Olson. San Luis Obispo. 
Irvlnic Pointer — Wm. A. Stuart, Eureka. 
G. Albert Mac — Worthlnnton Parsons. Salinas. 
Guy Dillon — F. S. Turner, Santa Rosa, 
California Dillon — F. S. Turner. Santa Rosa. 
Major Dillon — I''. S. Turner. Santa Rota. 
Harry Kinney— Win. Itourkc, Ban Bernardino. 

star Envoy- h. Nororln, Tulare 

Abonda Jay — H. II. Hclman. Salinas. 
Dickens B. — S. H. Burns. Santa Bosa. 
Ballte— D. Dudley, Dixon. 
McFadvcn — K. II. Dudley, Dixon. 
Del Oartho — I. R. Black. Arbuckle. 
Speedway — L. R. Stlne, Jjiton. 
Dawson — J. S. Manchester, Napa 

Washington McKinney Jr. — Fred 10. Kmlay, Marysvllle. 

Sir I'olenn — <' li. Marley. Woodland. 

Don Boslne — Dr. D. F. Hersprlng. Woodland, 

Pollerton — C. K. Avery. Farmersvlllo. 

King Lilly Pointer — Nesmlth * Sons, T,os Angeles. 

Clay Kdwln — Nesmlth & Sons, Hos Angeles. 



8 



THE BkEEDER and sportsman 



[Saturday, February 10, 1912. 



| NOTES AND NEWS | 

What stallion will you breed your mare to this 
season? 

Many of those to be sold at Chase's sale next Mon- 
day night should be placed in training at once. 



Adansel 2:14%, by Prince Ansel 2:20%, will make 
the season of 1912 at Sweetwater race track, San 
Diego. 



Does any of our readers know of anyone having a 
Palomena (yellow, with white mane and tail) stallion 
for sale? 



Flewy Flewy (dam of Charley D. 2:06%), by Memo, 
is booked to The Bondsman, so is Katharine 2:19, by 
Diablo 2:09<4. 



The dam of Dariel, that wonderfully fast mare from 
Chico is to be bred to The Exponent stallion, The 
Proof 2:29%, at Woodland this season. 



There are some mares to be sold next Monday 
night at the Chase sale which should have been 
worked for speed. They are in perfect condition. 



The pacing stallion King Cole, owned by R. O. 
Duncan, of Christchurch, New Zealand, holds the 
world's race record for two miles, 4:31. 

What will Don Cheval (4), by Bon Voyage 2:08, 
out of Silver Haw (dam of Helen Stiles 2:08>/ 4 ), by 
Silver Bow 2:16, bring at Chase's sale Monday- 
night? 

The thoroughbred mare Kosormonde, by Imported 
Ormonde, dam Fairy Rose, foaled February 25, 1895, 
died of pneumonia at Palo Alto, January 26th. Rosor- 
monde was a stake-winner and one of the handsomest 
mares foaled in California. 



A correspondent writes: "I. M. Lipson, of Tulare, 
has a filly foaled May 28, 1911, that was sired by 
R. O. Newman's beautiful bred stallion Best Policy. 
Last week she trotted an eighth of a mile in 23% 
seconds! It is hard to beat that." 



Harry E. Hopper, proprietor of the Hopper Stock 
Farm, Indianola, Iowa, who is passing the winter in 
Southern California, recuperating from the effects of 
a severe sickness of last fall, is rapidly regaining 
his health. 



The Horseman's Annual for 1912 makes its appear- 
ance from the press of Magnus Flaws & Co., Chicago, 
111. Price, $1. Copies for sale at this office. 



According to an Eastern journal. Miss Lotta Crab- 
tree loves horses but looks upon racing them as 
cruelty. Nevertheless Miss Crabtree, if correctly 
quoted, raced them when they had a chance for the 
money. It all depends! 



One of the commendable innovations planned for 
the New Pacific Coast Circuit, is a press agent to 
follow the circuit and see that the daily newspapers 
in each city correctly report the races, instead of 
butchering the facts as these papers usually do. 



T. W. Barstow, of San Jose, has sold his Nutwood 
Wilkes filly, Little Light, out of a mare by Bonnie 
Direct 2:05%, to Henry Rohner, of Eureka, Humboldt 
County, and shipped her Wednesday. 



Mrs. Weller, by McKinney 2:11 Vi, is due to drop a 
foal to Nearest McKinney 2:1314. Mrs. Weller is 
out of Much Better 2:07%, by Chas. Derby 2:20; 
second dam None Better 2:23%, by Allandorf 2:19%. 
She has a colt by Nearest McKinney that is, without 
doubt, the greatest trotting prospect in Santa Clara 
County; money cannot buy him. 



Now is the time for horsemen to get their sulkies, 
carts, etc.. put in shape for the coming season. 
Wm, J. Kenney is better prepared to do this work 
than anyone cn this Coast and promptly attends to 
all orders. 



Eva B., by McKinney 2:11*4, dam Iran Alto, second 
dam Flirtilla, a famous racing mare, is due to foal 
to Nearest McKinney 2:13%, and James Rea, her 
owner, can hardly wait to see what it will be. It 
ought to be one of the best. 



Prince Ansel (2) 2:20% will make the season of 
1912 at the Woodland race track. Judging from the 
showing as good game race horses his progeny has 
made he should have his book filled in a very short 
time. 

James Walker, the well-known horseman, died in 
terrible agony at Coldwater, Mich., Jan. 23, from in- 
juries received by a fall which he sustained the 
day before. The accident broke two ribs, one of 
which penetrated his lungs, and in a short time 
caused general embyfema, his body being bloated 
twice its natural size. Mr. Walker was at work 
on an article for "The Horseman" at the time of 
his death. He was a brother of the late E. C. 
Walker's ("Veritas") who, as we remember it, died 
from injuries received in a street car accident. 



C. A. Harrison, and E. R. Dunn and son, of Seattle, 
have been visiting Woodland and Sacramento and 
found time to go to the race tracks at these places 
and inspect the trotting horses. 



The Livermore Horse Show takes place next Satur- 
day, February 17th. It promises to be one of the 
best ever held there. It is an annual feature in this 
thriving town and is usually declared a holiday. 



Owners of good mares should not overlook The 
Patchen Boy (3) 2:10%. He gets speed and game- 
ness as well as beautiful foals from mares of all 
kinds. He is one of the "stoutest bred" stallions on 
the Pacific Coast and one of our greatest sires. 

The State Agricultural Society is doing all in its 
power toward creating a State-wide interest in our 
race meetings and also in the big race meeting and 
livestock exhibit in 1915. 

Owners of mares who intend to breed them this 
season should bear in mind that in 1915 there will 
be some futurity stakes to be decided, as well as 
races for two-year-olds, that will be worth thousands 
of dollars to the winners. 

Jennie S. 2:20 was bred as follows, according to 
W. H. Parker, of Stockton: Sired by Directum 
2: 05 '4, dam by Nephew; second dam by Gen. Dana. 
She was out of the dam of Steve 2:18%, and was 
bred by Clark Archer, of Linden, Cal. 



The blood of Silver Bow 2:16 cannot be hidden, it 
seems. Every animal in Geo. E. Stickle's consign- 
ment to be sold on Monday night that traces to this 
grandly bred son of Robt. McGregor 2:17% shows it 
What broodmares they should make, even if they 
never raced. 



The drawing for the oil painting of Norfolk for the 
benefit of Richard Havey, has been postponed until 
Wednesday, March 13, 1912. It will be awarded to 
the holder of the ticket containing the last two fig- 
ures of the capital prize in the M. & M. lottery draw- 
ing. 



Andrew Robertson arrived safely in Melbourne with 
all the thoroughbreds and trotters he shipped from 
this port in November. Mike Kelly, the gray trotter 
that A. Ottinger drove in the matinee races, gained 
flesh on the trip and will undoubtedly be heard from 
in the slow classes for which he is eligible there. 



There is talk of a stake being given by the San 
FYancisco Driving Club at the big 1915 race meeting 
at the Stadium. If such a stake materializes, and 
if it is for horses owned exclusively by members, 
there will be many additions made to the list of 
membership as soon as it is officially announced. 



Search warrant (3) 2:24%, the four-year-old trot- 
ting gelding, by Searchlight 2 : 03%, dam Bessie Taylor 
by Col. Hambrick, has arrived at Lexington and gone 
into the stable of St. Clair and Curry. This colt is 
reckoned as a very fast trotter as he worked in 
2:13% last fall as a three-year-old for Doc Curry. 



Dr. M. W. Hoagland, a well-known veterinary den- 
tist, who had an extensive practice at Haywards and 
San Leandro eighteen years ago, died at Melbourne, 
Australia, last month. He was well known and re- 
spected among racing men, and was the first veter- 
inary dentist to engage in business in Australasia. 



Colorado E. 2:04%, by The Bondsman, is out of a 
mare by Jay McGregor, he by Jay Hawker, out of 
Prue, by Robert McGregrr 2:17%. There are some 
mares carrying plenty of the blood of Robert Mc- 
Gregor to be sold at Chase's sale next Monday night, 
and any one who will purchase one of these will 
make no mistake in breeding her to The Bondsman. 

The trotter that Johnny Ray, the well-known Irish 
comedian, purchased, is called Almert and is by 
Zombro 2:11. Jas. Thompson, of Sacramento, sold 
him and will ship him east about* March 1st. Almert 
has no record but has been timed miles better than 
2:16. He is a big, strong, handsome bay gelding and 
should make a low record this year. 



Patrick Riley, who years ago was recognized as an 
expert horseman and who was an intimate friend of 
John Mackey when the Haggi'n breeding farm on the 
Rancho del Paso was in existence, died at the, county 
hospital, Sacramento, last Friday, at the age cf 80 
years. He had made his home with Dr. A. M. McCul- 
lum for the past fifteen years. 



The McMurray Sulky Co. (of which Wm. J. Kenney 
is the Pacific Coast agent) has adopted this policy: 
They will guarantee every sulky and cart they manu- 
facture to be free from imperfections and perfect in 
workmanship and materials. This applies for the 
life of the vehicle as long as there is any part of it 
left. Mr. Kenney has just received a new consign- 
ment of 1912 models. They are beauties! 



Remember our Breeders' Edition is to be issued 
March 9th. If you desire to get the benefit of our 
increased circulation for that number and want to 
reach every owner of a high-class broodmare, you 
should advertise your stallion in it, if you have one. 
If you have a mare, colt or filly for sale, send in the 
advertisement in time. Let everybody know what 
you have, that's where the benefit of advertising 
comes in. 



Visiters at the State Fair this year will see- many 
improvements, the greatest however, will be the ap- 
pearance of the entire infield of the race track. 
Many men have been employed ploughing, harrowing, 
scraping and leveling it and now it will be seeded 
with alfalfa. As water pipes are laid through this 
area it will be independent of the rainfall and in 
time will be one of the prettiest places imaginable. 

The adoption of the new stallion registration law 
in California is having its effect upon owners of stal- 
lions which do net come up to the requirements of 
the American Trotting Association. It is most un- 
fortunate that owners of the ancestors of many of the 
very fastest and best of these were careless in not 
having their mares and horses registered when the 
rules were not so stringent. 



According to a letter just received from Andrew 
Robertson, Melbourne, Australia, Joe Cuicello, the 
well-known horseman, did not go with him. ' Mr 
Robertson refused to take him and has not heard 
from him since he bade him good-bve on the wharf 
when the vessel sailed. He says that perhaps he 
may have got to Honolulu or New Zealand, as he 
seemed determined to get away. 



Dr. J. S. Schofield, who is training a stable of 
horses at Macon, Ga., for Wm. S. Ted, of Greenwich, 
Conn., has purchased from the Patchen Wilkes Stock 
Farm, Lexington, Ky., two yearling fillies by Peter 
the Great 2:07H. One is out of Bessie Ford, by- 
Happy King, the other out of Guycara, by Guy 
Wilkes 2:15%. They will be shipped to Macon to 
join the Tod stable already there. 



E. T. Ayres, of this city, recently purchased the 
pacing gelding Tom Murphy 2:08%, and will use him 
in the matinees at the Stadium this summer. Tom 
Murphy was sired by Gossiper, out of a mare by 
Memo, and got his record at Portland, Oregon, Sep- 
tember 25, 1908. He was named after the well- 
known trainer from Petaluma, who has charge of 
a big string of horses for the Czar of Russia at St. 
Petersburg. 



Robert Carter Wall, editor of the Hemet "News," 
and a great friend of Budd Doble's, passed away last 
Monday at Hemet. He was only thirty years old. 
His death is a serious loss to the community in which 
he lived. The deceased was a most enthusiastic 
horseman and always had something of interest to 
trotting horse men in the columns of his widely 
circulated newspaper. 



For the first time in many years the annual report 
of the State Agricultural Society has beed completed 
immediately following the close of the fiscal year. 
C. A. Telfer, the new secretary of the society, has 
already placed the report in the hands of the' State 
Printer, and it will be ready for transmittal to Gov- 
ernor Jchnson en his return from the East. Telfer 
reports much difficulty i.i securing the data from 
county supervisors. 

Harry Cowell, of Santa Cruz, has a two-year-old 
colt by Kinney Lou 2:07%, out of Dione 2:07% (dam 
of Bernice R. 2:11 U, the greatest stake-winning trot- 
ter on the Coast last year), that is a perfect counter- 
part of Dione and shows with the little work he has 
had that he is a very promising trotter. This gentle- 
man also owns a four-year-old filly by Cupid 2:18, 
out of Dione 2:07%, that many predict will be even 
faster than Bernice R. 2:11%. 



A number of carpenters are busily engaged build- 
ing box stalls at the Sweetwater race track, San 
Diego, and, in a few weeks, Charles Spencer will 
start from Woodland with a string of horses to put 
in them. Since acquiiing this track and land adjoin- 
ing, Messrs. Keefer and Spencer have learned that 
a number of prominent citizens of San Diego have 
made arrangements to have their horses developed 
on this splendid course, and also announced their 
intention of doing all they can to hold matinee races 
and a big race meeting there this fall. 

Richmond Chief 2:11, the game little roan stallion 
which raced so well about twenty years ago, was bred 
as follows: Sired by Menroe Chief 2:18'4, dam Ela 
by A. W. Richmond 1687; second dam Grey Dale (dam 
of Longworth 2:19 and dam of Al Bock 2:08% and 
Gusta Kline 2:22%) by American Boy Jr. (sire of 
the dam of Ventu